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Mmm... nutrients.

HOOAH! "The world's most powerful military has devoted its considerable resources to making an energy bar, and the results are impressive." Finally, you too can enjoy the delicious cuisine of the U.S. Military without having to join.
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Nov 27, 2005 - 59 comments

Passion of the chef

À la carte explores French cookery in just about every angle one can imagine. Featuring an extensive list of recipes, suggested menus, and in-depth articles ranging from how to plan a meal, to what tools to use, including everything one needs to know about knives. Like Strawberries, & crêpes? Want to know more about ice creams & sorbets? Obsessive is an understatement.
posted by riffola on Nov 25, 2005 - 14 comments

Hungry?

Hungry? You will be.
posted by brautigan on Nov 20, 2005 - 40 comments

High priced dining

The world's most expensive restaurants, though even these eateries pale in comparison to the $37,000 lunch and the $10,000 Martini on the Rock, poured over a diamond. As a New York Times food critic defends pricey meals, it is clear that times have changed since another famous Times critic drew letters of condemnation from the Vatican for his expensive dinner in 1975, which itself was a pale shadow of the most legendary costly meal ever, that of Antony and Cleopatra.
posted by blahblahblah on Nov 16, 2005 - 38 comments

MegaFeeders

Obesity: Epidemic or Myth?
posted by Gyan on Nov 16, 2005 - 54 comments

Plants and peoples of Britain and South Asia

Plant Cultures - central aim ... is to convey the richness and complexity of links between Britain and South Asia, through the story of plants and people
posted by Gyan on Nov 12, 2005 - 2 comments

Cheesey

Homemade cheese is where it's at, making cheese at home is like extreme sports, but without the sweat and it tastes better. Learn to make your own mozzarella, ricotta, swiss. Some would consider cheese is an essential part of our diet. Some would even consider it an essential part of their music. That is if cheese actually existed. Ah, the power of cheese.
posted by bigmusic on Nov 12, 2005 - 24 comments

Cereal Killer

Cereal + Milk = Liquid Cereal.
posted by ph00dz on Nov 12, 2005 - 34 comments

Star Wars Fans Are Weird

Star Wars fans are weird.
posted by swift on Nov 11, 2005 - 40 comments

Chocolate!

The Sweet Lure of Chocolate
posted by Gyan on Nov 1, 2005 - 16 comments

Ted Allen talks

Ted Allen interview! The food and wine expert on Queer Eye has a new cookbook out, and he talks to Slashfood about...well, everything: favorite foods, music, books, beer, birds, and other things.
posted by braun_richard on Oct 20, 2005 - 15 comments

The best burritos in the world

Many San Franciscans, when returning to the city after a trip, will tell you the first thing they want after they get back is a burrito. With features like reviews, playoffs, and a monthly newsletter, burritoeater.com is your resource for finding your slab in The City. What? Oh, I guess they have burritos in other cities, too, huh.
posted by greasepig on Oct 18, 2005 - 34 comments

SOS or Safegaurd organic standards

SOS or Safegaurd Organic Standards is what the Organic Consumers Association is calling their effort to protect the USDA's National Organic Program's organic food standards adopted in 2002. A rider attached to the 2006 agriculture appropriations bill and sponsored by the Organic Trade Association contains changes to the standards that in their view will make "technical corrections" to the national organic standards. This became necessary in their view after a 73-year-old organic blueberry farmer from Maine named Arthur Harvey won a court appeal against the USDA, arguing that federal regulations guiding organic food standards were less stringent than the original legislation had intended. This issue is splitting the organic standards lobbying community. Or perhaps this has been in the works for sometime as large corporate food producers have moved to take advantage of the rapid growth of the organics market. (more inside)
posted by flummox on Oct 9, 2005 - 14 comments

Someone has to draw the line.

You can't POSSIBLY be serious. The fact that modern breakfast foods (or at least, foods normally associated with breakfast) have expanded to include items such as cereals whose marshmallow content threatens to outweigh the actual nutritious content, slightly more nutritious items covered in frosting, and of course, the wide variety of chocolate flavored items, cereals, milk, muffins, and so on. But that's just breakfast. Now, however, we're getting into personal hygiene. And that may just be Snakes On A Plane dangerous.
posted by deusdiabolus on Oct 9, 2005 - 33 comments

No more knuckle sandwiches in the cafeteria.

Diet and behavior.
posted by Gyan on Sep 30, 2005 - 30 comments

Company Cookbook

The Company Cookbook. Have you ever attended a company potluck? Did you vote on recipes and create a cookbook to send as promo to unsuspecting clients? Warning: If you select to read this post, you take "pot luck" - what was available, not knowing for sure what you might receive. (But be sure that, with this cookbook, it will include shredded cheese). And as a bonus, things you shouldn't bring to the company potluck.
posted by tidecat on Sep 27, 2005 - 13 comments

A history of modern military rations

A history of modern military rations from canning to MREs. Also, reproductions of American, Russian, Italian, British, and Japanese WWII rations.
posted by milovoo on Sep 22, 2005 - 49 comments

Chinese food around the world

Chinese food around the world. Ethnic Chinese immigrants worldwide took their cuisine with them. New Yorkers are familiar with Cuban-Chinese restaurants, owned by ethnic Chinese from Cuba who served steam tables of ropa vieja and chuletas right next to the pork fried rice and wonton soup. In Jamaica & Trinidad, Chinese immigrants pioneered jerk chicken lo mein and bok choy & callaloo stirfries.

Or how in Peru, Chinese Peruvians developed their country's restaurant industry and created a national dish, lomo saltado along the way.

But then there's the Indian-Chinese food popularized by the descendants of ethnic Hakkas who moved to Mumbai in the 18th century. Personally, I'm partial to some lollipop chicken or gobi manchurian with a nice, cold Kingfisher.
posted by huskerdont on Sep 22, 2005 - 57 comments

You might think me a glutton..... i sort of hate her

Chez Pim the gastronomic blog of a little thai woman.... and her very own write up in the observer. I sort of agree with one of the comments.... the shots of the food make me feel empty.
posted by sourbrew on Sep 14, 2005 - 14 comments

These chickens are looking for a good home

Who will speak for the chickens?
posted by mullingitover on Sep 13, 2005 - 34 comments

New York Haute Cuisine

The Epicurean online. Charles Ranhofer's 1893 book The Epicurean is available online from the Michigan State University Library and the Museum as part of their Feeding America digital project. Ranhofer was the head chef at Delmonico's Restaurant from 1862 to 1894; he popularized the Escoffier version of French cooking to America, modifying it to take advantage of American foods such as turkey, squash, corn, and Pacific salmon. Besides thousands of recipes, The Epicurean discusses table settings, menus, various methods of presentation, and kitchen management. The book may be downloaded as a PDF in two parts.
posted by watsondog on Sep 11, 2005 - 7 comments

Mmmm... Hairy donuts!

YUM! Human hair in your food!
posted by loquacious on Sep 4, 2005 - 15 comments

whew.

Convoy on the go. Most of you probably already know this, but a massive convoy of food in and people out of downtown New Orleans is underway. On CNN they have video from helicopters, showing lines of hundreds of busses. This is a huge relief.
posted by delmoi on Sep 2, 2005 - 269 comments

Mmmmmmm...

A new food blog! Slashfood. Looks like a good one. They seem to be covering pretty much everything. Instant bookmark!
posted by braun_richard on Aug 19, 2005 - 25 comments

on my tongue

Are you HUNGRY or do you just crave the flavor? (my favorite is that Mustard is under the heading Exotic.)
posted by Phantast on Aug 17, 2005 - 29 comments

get to know your farmer

This journal is intended to share my love and appreciation for the hard work farmers and their families do to create such beautiful places and beautiful food. Tana Butler visists small farms near Santa Cruz, CA, sharing her thoughts and photographs [ farms | farmers | markets | food ].
posted by 김치 on Aug 16, 2005 - 21 comments

bacon

One bacon recipe per day, every day, forever.
posted by 김치 on Aug 11, 2005 - 29 comments

寿司

Sushi Encyclopedism covers everything from history to ettiquette to comics to the difference between 鯉 and 鮪.
posted by 김치 on Aug 9, 2005 - 38 comments

A Practical Explanation of the Principles of Healthful Cookery

Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project "...an online collection of some of the most important and influential American cookbooks from the late 18th to early 20th century." Includes scanned, searchable, and downloadable copies of such titles as "The Virginia Housewife, Or, Methodical Cook," "Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking Adapted to Persons of Moderate and Small Means," and "Food and Cookery for the Sick and Convalescent."
posted by tpl1212 on Aug 5, 2005 - 7 comments

National Sandwich Month

August is National Sandwich Month and some people are dead serious about their love for the sandwich, keeping track of every one eaten this month (and for 2004 and 2003). Clearly, we could all be doing much more to celebrate and support the sandwich.
posted by mathowie on Aug 5, 2005 - 23 comments

The smut that's SFW

One man's crop blight is another man's delight. Also called corn smut, Ustilago maydis is a fungus that infects corn plants and is typically destroyed in the US. However, in some parts of the world, Cuitlacoche or huitlacoche is considered a fine delicacy. For over 100 years it has been used in science as a model for pathogenic development, but it is only recently that it has been deliberately cultivated for food in the US. Are you brave enough to eat it? Here are some recipes for you to try.
posted by hindmost on Aug 3, 2005 - 32 comments

Food porn

Boston Chefs - Search by location or name, and view each gorgeous portfolio
posted by growabrain on Jul 28, 2005 - 10 comments

A mellow cow is better than a mad cow

Have you heard of Kobe beef? How about Liechtenstein's milk?
posted by magullo on Jul 27, 2005 - 33 comments

Not for veggies..

The best American hamburgers? The American Hamburger is one of those things that I truly miss about the US and one of those things that we Brits try to copy but, for some reason, just never seem to get right.

Forget the golden-arches, we need some proper hamburger joints serving up half-pound burgers, real milkshakes and endless refills...
posted by Nugget on Jul 26, 2005 - 119 comments

Me So Gourmet

"If MSG is so bad for you, why doesn't everyone in Asia have a headache?" A brief history of and exploration some myths and facts surrounding MSG, glutamate (its natural expression) and umami - 'the fifth taste'. "We now know that glutamate is present in almost every food stuff, and that the protein is so vital to our functioning that our own bodies produce 40 grams of it a day. Probably the most significant discovery in explaining human interest in umami is that human milk contains large amounts of glutamate (at about 10 times the levels present in cow's milk). [...] Which means mothers' milk and a packet of cheese'n'onion crisps have rather more in common than you'd think."
posted by Blue Stone on Jul 10, 2005 - 227 comments

Chevre, Chia Seed, Chifferi ... No Chi Chi's?

Glossary of Food Terms From Abalone to Zweiback, this extensive reference of food terms is found, somewhat surprisingly, on the site of a salsa manufacturer. Who knew advertising could be so useful?
posted by jacquilynne on Jul 6, 2005 - 9 comments

Nosheteria

Bourgie (boo-zhee) Entertaining food blog (previous mefi topic) Regularly updated and worth a look for those interested in food ;) Written from Berkeley but not region specific, sometimes recipes.

"what is a bourgie? First let's get the pronunciation down, boo-zhee, sort of rhymes with sue me. Actually, it doesn't rhyme at all. It's the truncated version of bourgeoisie, you remember middle school history, Marie Antoinette, the rising middle class. But to English speaking nations, assuming that is what you belong to, this is the class with which we aspire to belong. And with food, it's almost the intangible. That little bit of effort that brings the dreary to the divine."
posted by wuakeen on Jun 28, 2005 - 26 comments

Foodfilter

The World's Healthiest Foods
posted by Gyan on Jun 24, 2005 - 21 comments

Mayo from 1951? Hmmmmm!

How long stuff lasts. So I guess I can have that mayo, honey and anti-freeze sandwich now? Or any time for that matter.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Jun 20, 2005 - 42 comments

The Golden Spurtle

Porridge. Lots of Porridge. Not the (allegedly) classic BBC TV comedy, but the stuff you make from oats and that's fed generations of Scots. And now you too can attempt to win the Golden Spurtle and be crowned the World Porridge Making Champion. Some light relief for a Monday..
posted by Nugget on Jun 13, 2005 - 10 comments

Shouldn't you cook salmon in your dishwasher?

Shouldn't you cook salmon in your dishwasher? Poaching fish in the dishwasher is a virtually foolproof way to shock your friends, prepare a succulent meal, and do the dishes—all at the same time. Not all of the The Surreal Gourmet's offerings are quite so weird, but they might, as he claims, make you into a culinary hero.
posted by QuietDesperation on Jun 6, 2005 - 20 comments

The Medieval Diet

Scotlands diet was healthier in 1405 (within a lifetime of the Black Death) than today, according to archaeologists. Might we see the "Medieval diet" replace the "Mediterranean diet"? Some traditional food practitioners think so.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 5, 2005 - 40 comments

Gode Cookery

Gode Cookery. A compilation of medieval recipes adapted for the 21st century kitchen. [via Monkeyfilter]
posted by jb on Jun 3, 2005 - 15 comments

Crying while eating

Crying, while eating.
posted by Tlogmer on May 20, 2005 - 39 comments

Anhui Fujian Guangdong Hunan Jiangsu Shangdong Shanghai Sichuan Zhejiang

Eating Chinese
posted by casu marzu on May 3, 2005 - 19 comments

Addiction Study, Plastics & Ocean Mixing

Bees, Brains and Addiction
Tin Cans and Your Prostate
Salty Staircase and Ocean Mixing
posted by dfowler on May 3, 2005 - 13 comments

World's Best Restaurant

World's best restaurant serves up molecular gastronomy.
(parallel thread)
posted by peacay on Apr 19, 2005 - 17 comments

I'd like myPyramid with fries, please.

USDA releases new food pyramid(s). Instead of one cogent nutritional guideline for all Americans, the USDA has released a dozen because "one size doesn't fit all." Dietitians have advocated revision for a while now but change has been slow. According to author Marion Nestle, the nutritional guidelines have become highly politized by industry lobbyists: "My first day on the job, I was given the rules: No matter what the research indicated, the report could not recommend 'eat less meat' as a way to reduce intake of saturated fat." Newspeak for sweets appears to be discretionary calories; are we doing any better?
posted by fatllama on Apr 19, 2005 - 29 comments

Grain Power!

Why should the UN spend money to feed the hungry when they can simply pay a software company to create a video game about feeding the hungry? "In an exciting and dynamic form, Food Force will generate kids' interest and understanding about hunger, which kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined,” says Neil Gallagher, the World Food Programme’s Director of Communications.
posted by NotMyselfRightNow on Apr 14, 2005 - 15 comments

http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/

Home Economics Archive: Research, Tradition and History (HEARTH). From Cornell University, HEARTH is an internet resource collecting home economics texts from 1850 to 1950, including Meals that cook themselves and cut the costs, by Christine Frederick (1915), and The young woman's guide to excellence, by William A. Alcott (1852), as well as the Journal of Home Economics from 1909 to 1980.
posted by monju_bosatsu on Apr 11, 2005 - 6 comments

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