12 posts tagged with foodhistory.
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The uncertain history of Hollandaise: dueling stories of a tasty sauce

Hollandaise sauce might sound like a typical Dutch delicacy, however, it isn’t from the Netherlands at all, and instead was originally called Sauce Isigny (Google books) after a town in Normandy, Isigny-sur-Mer, known for its butter and other dairy products, but was renamed Sauce Hollandaise in World War I when butter was imported from Holland. Or was it? (Gb). When the once exiled Huguenots returned from northern Europe back to France, they may have brought a creamy, lemony sauce known as Sauce à la Hollandaise, as listed there in François Marin's 1758 cookbook Les Dons de Comus, and similarly in The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton as "Dutch Sauce for Fish," and "Green sauce, or Hollandaise verte" (Archive.org). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 2, 2016 - 58 comments

“an ahead-of-its-time innovation and an exactly-of-its-time decadence”

The Legend of the Choco Taco [Eater] “For just about everyone other than the French inventor of the Cronut, the Choco Taco [wiki] is the stuff of nostalgic summer sweet tooth obsession — the most beloved and innovative of all the American ice cream "novelties." Its acolytes are legion. Restaurant pastry chefs and boutique scoop shop owners regularly pay homage.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 26, 2016 - 30 comments

How to Feed an Army

Feeling overwhelmed by the prospect of feeding your holiday guests? Maybe you should refresh yourself on "How to Feed an Army" (1901). Perhaps a history lesson on feeding the troops would inspire you? (Break out your P38.) Ever wonder about the nutritional content of combat rations? Can sailors bring ship-grown lettuce to the table? [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Nov 22, 2015 - 24 comments

"to write in cafés is such a cliché that it needs no explanation"

In London, the coffeehouse offered the threat not of male homosexuality but rather of a different kind of dangerous male-on-male behavior, namely "wasting time." Coffee itself was often thought to be disgusting — a few of the names used by detractors were "syrup of soot," "a foreign fart," "a sister of the common sewer," "resembling the river Styx," "Pluto's diet-drink," "horsepond liquor" — but even for those who thought coffee led to medical problems, especially impotence, it was not as threatening as the spaces where it was drunk. Some perceived the coffeehouse as pure waste, a corrupting influence on London society, while others celebrated it with a strange enthusiasm.
Writing in Cafés: A Personal History by food historian Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 23, 2015 - 65 comments

"Pizza with a Bisquick crust? Sounds like ’60s home ec to me."

King Arthur Flour's Flourish blog investigates America's Love Affair With Pizza from the home cook's perspective. In The Beginning asks "When did Americans start making their own pizza at home, from scratch, rather than piling into the Studebaker to drive down to the pizza parlor for takeout?", and answers by reproducing pizza recipes from 1945, 1954, and 1961. [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Jul 27, 2014 - 60 comments

The Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery

The Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery is an annual weekend conference discussing food, its history, and culture. Since 1981 the papers presented at the Symposium have been collected into a conference volume called the Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, most of which have been made available for free in their entirety via Google Books. Each volume consists of about 25-40 papers surrounding the theme of that year's Symposium (e.g. Eggs, Authenticity, or The Meal). [more inside]
posted by jedicus on Jul 17, 2014 - 8 comments

It's a very reasonable way to eat out.

"I enjoy buffets. I wouldn't say love buffets, but it's a very reasonable way to eat out." (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 6, 2014 - 64 comments

The circuitous histories of hamburgers and ketchup

The history of the hamburger could be a relatively short story, or one spanning centuries and continents, depending on how far you disassemble the modern hamburger. If you look for the origins of ground meat between two pieces of bread, that's something American, but where and when exactly is the question. But how did we get the ground meat patty? You can thank the Mongols and Kublai Khan, who brought their ground meat to Russia. Oh, and don't forget the fish sauce! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 19, 2013 - 35 comments

The origins and history of brown sauce

The origins and history of brown sauce. The origins and history of brown sauce. The origins and history of brown sauce.
posted by Deathalicious on Nov 16, 2012 - 69 comments

Recreating 600+ Years of Conspicuous Consumption

Ivan Day is both chef and historian. Using old equipment and original research in primary sources for recipes and descriptions, he can "cook a meal from any time from the Battle of Agincourt to the First World War," recreating historic banquets and collations in full detail. Galleries of his food exhibitions show that he can back that claim up, and that rapid changes in culinary trends are not of recent vintage. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Apr 4, 2009 - 25 comments

de-atkinvate

Bread. History of the victual.
posted by the fire you left me on Jan 13, 2004 - 2 comments

Ancient Recipes: Foods of Bible Times

Ancient Recipes: Foods of Bible Times will be broadcast on the Food Network at 9:00 P.M. ET on Sunday, Nov. 26. For the longest time I was under the impression that the only food items mentioned in the Bible are fish, bread, wine, quails and heavenly manna (which you can now buy on the internet). Then there are those peddling Pulse as bible food. Maybe it's time to change dietary habits.
posted by tamim on Nov 24, 2000 - 0 comments

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