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12 posts tagged with gaelic.
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Mouth music

Canntaireachd (Scottish Gaelic: literally, "chanting"; Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kʰãũn̪ˠt̪ɛɾʲəxk]) is the ancient Scottish Highland method of noting classical pipe music or Ceòl Mòr by a combination of definite syllables, by which means the various tunes could be more easily recollected by the learner, and could be more easily transmitted orally. [more inside]
posted by Callicvol on Mar 19, 2013 - 10 comments

Pangur Bán

I and Pangur Bán, my cat,
'Tis a like task we are at;
Hunting mice is his delight,
Hunting words I sit all night.
[...]
(spoken version, set to music) [more inside]
posted by Joe in Australia on Feb 24, 2013 - 20 comments

Keeping Celtic languages alive on TV and the Web

Since 1980, the Celtic Media Festival has brought together people who broadcast, and now Webcast, in Celtic languages. Videoblog Gwagenn.TV provides a report (with autoplaying video) from the 2009 festival whose clips and interviews are spoken and subtitled variously in Breton, French, English, Welsh, Scots Gaelic and Irish, Catalan, and Basque, not all of which are actually Celtic. [more inside]
posted by joeclark on Sep 15, 2009 - 5 comments

These marks in printer's ink

The Táin lithographs In 1967 Louis le Brocquy was commissioned to illustrate Thomas Kinsella's translation of the great Irish prose epic the Táin Bó Cuailnge. The resulting collaborative volume is widely acknowledged as the great Irish Livre d'Artiste of the twentieth century; Le Brocquy's "brush drawings merged seamlessly with the text; stark, fluent images, they expressed with great economy of means an epic breadth, evoking the movement of vast masses of people. Individual participants in the drama were also pulled into close focus."
posted by Abiezer on Jun 6, 2009 - 19 comments

Julie Fowlis

I had not heard of Julie Fowlis until this morning. [more inside]
posted by weapons-grade pandemonium on Dec 27, 2008 - 61 comments

Gaelic Psalm Singing

THE church elder’s reaction was one of utter disbelief. Shaking his head emphatically, he couldn’t take in what the distinguished professor from Yale University was telling him. "No," insisted Jim McRae, an elder of the small congregation of Clearwater in Florida. "This way of worshipping comes from our slave past. It grew out of the slave experience, when we came from Africa." But Willie Ruff, an Afro-American professor of music at Yale, was adamant - he had traced the origins of gospel music to Scotland. [more inside]
posted by brautigan on Jan 11, 2008 - 96 comments

The Inaccessible Oscars

Seachd (English title: The Inaccessible Pinnacle) [main movie site, incl. embedded video. Loads of resources on Gaeldom] is the first Scots Gaelic feature film to receive mainstream distribution. Despite good reviews, BAFTA won't be nominating it for a foreign-language Oscar. Not that they thought a different film was better, it seems they just couldn't be arsed.
posted by Abiezer on Sep 28, 2007 - 16 comments

Voice from the Cave of Gold

Sorley MacLean Probably best known for Hallaig, MacLean (Somhairle MacGill-Eain) was one of the finest poets of the twentieth century and has been credited with a renaissance in the literature of his native Scots Gaelic. The site has information about his life, critical writings and poetry, and some audio and video of the great man reading and talking about his work.
posted by Abiezer on May 22, 2007 - 5 comments

The Great Book of Gaelic

The Great Book of Gaelic. Illustrated poetry.
posted by plep on Mar 14, 2005 - 15 comments

Bhí Pádraig agus Michéal sa teach tabhairne

Should Gaelic be an official EU language? As a happy member of the SCA I promise to revise all my past snarkiness and negative thinking about the EU if this happens. I will read (ploddingly and with a dictionary) all those speeches by Chirac and Schroder--as soon as they're translated into Gaelic. If Maltese can be an EU language of diplomacy, why not Gaelic? While the world around us rages, we'll return to the Middle Ages. (From crookedtimber)
posted by jfuller on Jun 25, 2004 - 27 comments

How Do You Say ASSALAMU ALAIKUM in Gaelic?

How Do You Say ASSALAMU ALAIKUM in Gaelic? Plans have been announced in the Irish Republic to translate the Koran, Islam's most sacred text, into Irish. The ambitious project aims to bring Ireland's Gaelic-speakers and Muslim communities closer together, Leslie Carter of the Islamic Cultural Centre in Dublin said.
posted by turbanhead on Mar 11, 2003 - 14 comments

Roll Your Own Curses in Gaelic

Roll Your Own Curses in Gaelic
Confirming my long held suspicion that the best the Web can do is automate and diversify Mad Libs functions.
posted by rschram on Aug 18, 2000 - 1 comment

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