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10 posts tagged with ghosttowns.
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Palisades del Rey (Surfridge ghost town)

Surfridge is a ghost town in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. It overlooks the Pacific Ocean and is now home to 125,000 El Segundo blue butterflies.
posted by xowie on Mar 29, 2014 - 20 comments

For all your ghost town needs

Do you like obsessively cataloged information? Do you like abandoned, semi-abandoned, and/or semi-repopulated ghost towns? Do you like amazingly poor web design? Then you will love ghosttowns.com, an exhaustive collection of thousands of ghost towns in the US and Canada. Find out how to visit ghost towns, and then click on the map to find one near you!
posted by showbiz_liz on Dec 10, 2013 - 24 comments

Coal Camps USA.

Coalfields of the Appalachian Mountains. An encyclopedia of coal towns.
posted by xowie on Oct 7, 2013 - 17 comments

Perry Van Arsdale's maps of US historic events

In 1960 or so, Professor Perry C. Van Arsdale was helping his 7-year-old granddaughter researching the Santa Fe trail. He found his granddaughter's textbook to have some number of errors. He set off to create a map of pioneer history (prior to the 1900's), using his own knowledge and information from judges, sheriffs, and descendants of historical figures. This was his start in creating the Pioneer New Mexico map, which would contain 300 towns that no longer exist, old trails of all sorts (including the three historic Santa Fe trails and various camel routes), locations of minor squabbles and major battles, and because he couldn't fit everything on the maps, he also included extensive notes in the corner of the map. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 27, 2013 - 17 comments

Desert Sands Reclaim a Ghost Town

Kolmanskop, a ghost town buried in the sand
posted by jonson on Jan 31, 2008 - 13 comments

Tumbleweed required!

First post, deep breath, here goes nuffin. Judith Bingham is a multitalented British born classical singer, composer and musician. Driving home in the dark on Halloween listening to Radio Three (I'll let someone else out there explain Radio Three to our overseas cousins), I was particularly taken by her atmospheric choral setting of 'Ghost towns of the American West' a poem by Vesta Pierce Crawford, a Mormon Utah poet associated with the University. Despite delving much further into Mormon websites than I would usually care to venture I have not been able to find the text of the poem, if anyone out there can give a hand I'd be grateful. Judith Bingham also wrote an opera based on the life of Errol Flynn! Now that I would like to see. [more inside]
posted by surfdad on Nov 28, 2007 - 10 comments

"Here stood their citadel, but now grown over with weeds..."

The extraordinary Center For Land Use Interpretation is a tertiary reference for one of today's posts, and it's been mentioned in comments before. Don't miss the Land Use Database or the Newsletter.
posted by scrump on Jul 25, 2006 - 9 comments

Smithsonian Magazine's new photo contest

Smithsonian Magazine is holding its first-ever photo contest, open to all adult non-professional photographers to submit entries in five categories. (Professionals may want to see about freelance opportunities here.) I find it particularly nice that there is no entry fee, and no citizenship requirements. For inspiration you may want to browse a gallery of Smithsonian freelance photographers or view the beautiful (and seasonally appropriate) Ghost Towns by Night Light and pick up a few tips on night photography from the photographer.
posted by taz on Oct 10, 2003 - 23 comments

Ghost Towns

Ghost Town Gallery 1300 Pictures from 174 Ghost Towns and historic places. (They've also got maps.)
posted by Fabulon7 on Nov 28, 2002 - 16 comments

During my long and mis-spent youth, I often spent time traveling the long dusty spaces between southern New Mexico and west Texas. There's a wide patch in the road called Orogrande, New Mexico, a virtual ghost town. I've always wondered why there'd even be a town in the middle of the desert and nowhere. Now I know why. Forgive the numerous pop-ups (and occassional ad for boobies) won't you? This is a tremendous resource for those interested.
posted by WolfDaddy on Jul 16, 2002 - 17 comments

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