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"I think it's the person inside that matters"

Shatteringly Beautiful: The Glass Dresses of Diana Dias-Leão
Diana Dias-Leão combined her fashion design and glass making skills to create couture dresses made of glass, ceramics, wire and silken yarns to stunning effect. Beautiful, but how do you wear a breakable dress? Well, you don't. These were created as art pieces to explore serious issues around personal identity, beauty and human behaviour. The artist believes that anorexia, bulimia, self harm and body dysmorphic disorder are connected with issues relating to image and lack of confidence.
[more inside]
posted by Lexica on Jul 25, 2014 - 16 comments

Not the Mario you were expecting

Mario: animated short An animation of a chilling Italian children's (?) song, created by painting frames on glass! [via mefi projects]
posted by ignignokt on Jul 15, 2014 - 4 comments

Protein Packing

Harvard University and XVIVO have come together again (Previouslyw/ a commercial focus, Previouslierw/an Academic focus) to add to the growing series of scientific animations for BioVisions -- Harvard's multimedia lab in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. 'Protein Packing' strives to more accurately depict the molecular chaos in each and every cell, with proteins jittering around in what may seem like random motion. Proteins occupy roughly 40% of the cytoplasm, creating an environment that risks unintentional interaction and aggregation. Via diffusion and motor protein transport, these molecules are directed to sites where they are needed.
Much of this is no doubt inspired by the beautiful art and explained illustrations of David Goodsell, a biologist at Scripps who has been accurately portraying the crowdedness of the cellular landscape for a long time now.
[more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Apr 10, 2014 - 9 comments

Does What it Says on the Tin

These Are Cats Sitting On Glass.
posted by xbonesgt on Mar 28, 2014 - 14 comments

Selecting the right glass can be key

Can the shape of your glass enhance the taste of the wine? Do you need to change your glass depending on what you're drinking? "I'm pretty sure that the right glassware can't make a bad wine good, but it can make a good wine more enjoyable." With that in mind, here is a guide to selecting the proper wine glass. A few bonus links: how to choose the right cocktail glass, and Beer Advocate breaks down glassware by types of beer.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 12, 2013 - 65 comments

“I’m taking a picture of you,” the man says.

Gary Shteyngart (previously-ish) tries on a pair of Google Glasses (SLnewyorker)
posted by bbuda on Jul 29, 2013 - 55 comments

At least you know it's recording...

The end of Summer 2013 should see the release of Memoto, a wearable camera that takes a picture of what's in front of you every thirty seconds 24/7. Billed as an unobtrusive observer for lifebloggers, it is also being touted as a legal witness and an alibi provider. An interview that asks Memoto's CEO about privacy. (warning: interview filmed in shaky-cam)
posted by Tell Me No Lies on Jun 23, 2013 - 38 comments

Silicon-based viruses of the analog kind

A selection of glass viruses by artist Luke Jerram (a full gallery and photographs of other sculptural work are also available directly from his site)
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Apr 9, 2013 - 9 comments

A fascinating craft. The story of the last glass eye maker in Britain.

The last of the glass eye makers | Losing an eye through illness or accident can devastate a person's life. A "glass" eye can help some people come to terms with it | Audio: Jost Haas is the last glass eye maker left in Britain, and he is close to retirement. He comes from Germany, where glass eye technology was perfected nearly 200 years ago. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 27, 2013 - 10 comments

Glass detonations

Smarter Every Day examines the physics of Prince Rupert's drop. Deceptively simple to create, these teardrop-shaped glass structures demonstrate the physics of tempered glass in spectacular fashion. Previously
posted by Morriscat on Mar 25, 2013 - 34 comments

The future, but with monthly updates

I used Google Glass - "But what’s it actually like to have Glass on? To use it when you’re walking around? Well, it’s kind of awesome."
posted by unliteral on Feb 26, 2013 - 226 comments

Masters at work

If you're interested in glassblowing, or if you simply like to watch craftsmen at work, then here's a special treat for you: the Corning Museum of Glass (previously) has posted hours upon hours of videos of their studio demonstrations on Youtube. And if that's not enough, you might want to bookmark their live streams page, for they will be streaming about a dozen studio demonstrations over the summer. [more inside]
posted by daniel_charms on Feb 18, 2013 - 11 comments

The Unsettling Beauty of Lethal Viruses

“Viruses have no color as they are smaller than the wavelength of light,” says Jerram, in an email. “So the artworks are created as alternative representations of viruses to the artificially colored imagery we receive through the media.” Jerram and Davidson create sketches, which they then take to the glassblowers, to see whether the intricate structures of the diseases can be replicated in glass, at approximately one million times their original size. RECENTLY
posted by heyho on Feb 8, 2013 - 26 comments

Shattered Glass Animals

Shattered Glass: Animal Sculptures "Using carefully broken shards of colored glass, Polish artist Marta Klonowska assembles translucent animals in life-like proportion and size." Title link contains small collection of eleven images. The gallery portfolio of the artist contains a more extensive list. The glass sculptures were originally shown at the European Glass Content exhibition, which took place on the Baltic island of Bornholm in 2011. [more inside]
posted by Faintdreams on Feb 8, 2013 - 26 comments

When Walt Met Peter Met Abe Met Andy Met Philip: "The Perfect American"

"Disney goes to Anaheim late at night to help repair the animatronic Disneyland Lincoln, which has been malfunctioning and attacking members of the audience. Disney gets in an argument with the robot about blacks, and Lincoln goes crazy again and whacks Walt...." (source). Starting today at 2 PM Eastern time (just under 3 hours from now) and for the next 90 days, medici.tv will stream, free of charge, Teatro Real's January 22 premiere performance of the new Philip Glass opera The Perfect American. It's based on the novel of the same name by Peter Stephan Jungk, which the NY Times called "a surreal, meditative, episodic account of the last days of Walt Disney." Four minute preview video. ENO rehearsal trailer. (Happy belated 76th, Mr. Glass.) [more inside]
posted by maudlin on Feb 6, 2013 - 21 comments

Steamboat Willie overdubbed with the Koyaanisqatsi theme. [SLYT]

The Disney classic paired with Phillip Glass' classic theme. Oddly unsettling on a number of levels.
posted by baconaut on Jan 13, 2013 - 36 comments

"the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all machinery"

Paul Stankard is a virtuoso with glass. Unlike most of his contemporaries in the studio glass movement, Stankard started as a tradesman, a scientific glassmaker, and his work is not blown, but instead is flameworked. He creates miniature botanicals—at first, exact representations of existing flowers, and now, credible but imaginary plants, complete with human roots. His work, and his day to day life, is influenced a great deal by Walt Whitman. Stankard says, "I'm not wise enough, not educated enough to experience Whitman at his absolute fullest; I have to work at it." And he works at it through glass.
posted by ocherdraco on Jan 9, 2013 - 12 comments

Heart of Glass

Glass anatomical models: "Gary Farlow [...] and his team of 10 at Farlow’s Scientific Glassblowing are able to transform the body’s vasculature—and nearly all of its other parts—into an ornate borosilicate glass sculpture, from the heart’s ventricles to the brain’s circle of Willis[...]Their anatomically correct models can be designed to simulate blood flow, teach placement of catheters and angioplasty devices, or simply test or demo new surgical gizmos. Individual arteries, veins, and capillaries are shaped and fused together, one at a time."
posted by OmieWise on Oct 25, 2012 - 17 comments

Have you cracked?

How to fix your cracked iPhone glass I hope this will help you save some money if you crack your iPhone screen. Then please take the money you would have spent to go do something nice for someone.
posted by Yellow on Jul 19, 2012 - 57 comments

Made By Hand

Craftsmen and women, some of them the last of their breed, making their art by hand and profiled in beautiful short-form videos: Knifemaker. Ornamental glass artist (previously). Master printer . Swordguard maker (previously). Beekeeper and honey maker. Stone lettercarvers. Carmaker. More, and related, at This Is Made By Hand, FolkStreams.net and (less related, but still wonderful) eGarage.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Feb 27, 2012 - 19 comments

9 pictures of cats on glass tables taken from below

9 pictures of cats on glass tables taken from below
posted by timsneezed on Feb 10, 2012 - 19 comments

Listening to the past, recorded on tin foil and glass, for the first time in over a century

Towards the end of the 1800s, there were three primary American groups competing to invent technology to record and play back audio. Alexander Graham Bell worked with with Charles Sumner Tainter and Chichester Bell in at their Volta Laboratory in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., while Thomas A. Edison worked from his Menlo Park facilities, and Emile Berliner worked in his independent laboratory in his home. To secure the rights to their inventions, the three groups sent samples of their work to the Smithsonian. These recordings became part of the permanent collections, now consisting of 400 of the earliest audio recordings ever made. But knowledge of their contents was limited to old, short descriptions, as the rubber, beeswax, glass, tin foil and brass recording media are fragile, and playback devices might damage the recordings, if such working devices are even available. That is, until a collaborative project with the Library of Congress and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory came together to make 2D and 3D optical scanners, capable of visually recording the patterns marked on discs and cylinders, respectively. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 10, 2012 - 21 comments

Faster, ping pong balls! Ping! Ping!

So maybe you've caught some recent iPhone commercials and wondered, "Is that Philip Glass? Surely Glass wouldn't do an Apple commercial, would he?" Well, not yet (although he did appear at the Manhattan Apple Store a while back). That piece you hear in the commercials, which sounds a lot like Truman Sleeps, but faster and tinklier, is by Keith Keniff. But if you want to hear Truman Sleeps covered a little faster and and a lot tinklier, you have to go to Carlo Castellano, a guy with a studio, a glockenspiel, and lots and lots of ping pong balls.
posted by maudlin on Nov 12, 2011 - 34 comments

Visiting Deep Space...in Queens

Visiting Deep Space...in Queens This incredible room at the Hall of Science in Queens was originally built for the 1964 World's Fair to give visitors the feeling of being in deep space. Really beautiful, unearthly design. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by bru on Nov 7, 2011 - 19 comments

Hard candy is a type of glass

Did you know that hard candy is actually a glass? Neither did I! Learn the science with this detailed protocol for making your own that helps explain what is going on. (PDF) Bored with the protocol and need a recipe instead? Let these two hardcore hammer wielding home candy-making women show you the ropes. All using common or easily acquirable equipment.
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 1, 2011 - 49 comments

Amazing! Yakity-Yak Talking Teeth

It started because of an odd ad for denture containers, Tooth Garage (for sanitary, safe parking of false teeth), and became one of the gags in Marvin Glass' collection of novelty products (whose gags would include fake vomit [prev], Rock ’Em Sock ’Em Robots, and more [prev] ); usually an inexpensive prank item or toy, but valuable when used as a promotional item for The Rolling Stones: Yakity-yak Talking Teeth, the history.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 26, 2011 - 2 comments

GlassPipes.org

GlassPipes.org has 217,287 pictures of glass pipes. Here are five of them.
posted by Trurl on Sep 30, 2011 - 52 comments

Pretty Trash

"No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that a rubbish dump being created would, in the space of a century, become a protected area. Yet that is exactly what happened to what has come to be known as Glass Beach, just outside Fort Bragg in California." [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Sep 1, 2011 - 20 comments

Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.

Know who's more fun at parties than you? This guy. [slyt]
posted by phunniemee on Aug 18, 2011 - 32 comments

Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Mother-lode. [more inside]
posted by Ahab on Aug 14, 2011 - 9 comments

This fine-art project is definitely going to give you cancer (or has already given you cancer).

The Hairpin shows us how to how to make a doll into a wine glass in 23 quick steps.
posted by item on May 16, 2011 - 35 comments

tonalist's videos: contemporary music in Moscow

tonalist (aka composer Pavel Karmanov) is a YouTube user who has uploaded numerous videos featuring performances of contemporary/classical music from the former Soviet Union... [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on May 9, 2011 - 3 comments

A museum shows its favorites folder

The Corning Museum of Glass (previously), not to be confused with the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington (previously), has named 60 favorites of their own collection and campus. The choices range from ancient, like the glass "portrait" of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep II, to the scientific, like the initial 200-inch disk intended for the Hale telescope at the Mt. Palomar observatory, to modern sculpture, like Family Matter by Jill Reynolds.
[more inside]
posted by knile on May 3, 2011 - 17 comments

Making of an Hourglass

The making of an hourglass. [SLVimeo]
posted by odinsdream on Apr 25, 2011 - 19 comments

I Really Like Focusing on the Tiny Details

Kiva Ford is an incredibly talented glassblower. By day, he creates custom scientific glassware for research and discovery chemistry. In his off hours, he creates artistic glass pieces that are both lovely and impossibly small. [more inside]
posted by avoision on Apr 15, 2011 - 32 comments

Windex should have subsidized this video....

A Day Made of Glass. (A vision of the near-future from the makers of Gorilla Glass.) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 8, 2011 - 80 comments

Glass dome over temporary Canadian House of Commons

Politicians who live in glass houses, etc. ... The Canadian House of Commons is in need of repair, and while it's being done, a dome will cover the elected gabbers. It might cost as "little" as $42 million or as much as $1 billion. The pre-construction vacuuming has already begun.
posted by anothermug on Feb 19, 2011 - 29 comments

American Pyrex Less Resistant to Thermal Shock

Flying Shards of Hot Glass. Reports of consumer injuries led Consumer Reports to investigate the safety of glass bakeware. It turns out that US-made Pyrex glass bakeware is no longer as resistant to thermal shock as it used to be, nor as resistant as European-made Pyrex still is. [more inside]
posted by palliser on Dec 11, 2010 - 53 comments

Lucio Bubacco

Lucio Bubacco is a master of the stunningly beautiful art of lampworked Venetian glass. His large freestanding work covers themes such as devils and mythology, Carnival, divine history, and sexual transgression [Potentially NSFW].* [more inside]
posted by Ahab on Nov 29, 2010 - 12 comments

No film is complete without the sound of breaking glass

Defenestration: The Movie
posted by bwg on Nov 21, 2010 - 58 comments

Glass Signs

The art of glass sign making. (via) A delightful and strangely relaxing short documentary about the work of David Smith, a craftsman and artist making beautiful traditional glass signs.
posted by Long Way To Go on Oct 25, 2010 - 10 comments

Get off your asphalt!

"I don't believe we're going to have the ability to build asphalt roads in 50 years."
posted by kinnakeet on Sep 23, 2010 - 121 comments

On Karma and building web reputation systems

On Karma: Top-line Lessons on User Reputation Design is an excellent overview of reputation system design concepts from the excellent-in-general blog of Randy Farmer and Bryce Glass, authors of the recently-released O'Reilly book Building Web Reputation Systems.
posted by cortex on Mar 23, 2010 - 17 comments

Little windows into the past

If you live in a sufficiently old city in the U.S.,Canada, or the UK you've probably seen these set into concrete sidewalks or the panels of cast iron steps. Termed vault lights in the U.S., pavement lights in the UK, and sidewalk prisms in Canada, the glass insets were originally clear and intended to produce daylighting in subterranean spaces. The ethereal purple color results from the glass's manganese content being exposed to ultraviolet light over time. Many vault lights or sidewalk prisms are in poor condition, but some are being repaired.
posted by bad grammar on Jan 19, 2010 - 46 comments

D'ohfenestration

Joseph Cavalieri is a stained glass artist. Among his works are illustrations of The Gormenghast novels, several panels based on physical culture ads of the 1950s, and a series depicting scenes from "The Missing Episode" of The Simpsons, such as The Countryman and the Serpent, The Death in the Playground, and Funeral for a Friend. via nag on the lake.
posted by Rumple on Dec 31, 2009 - 10 comments

Glass Microbiology

Glass Microbiology "These transparent glass sculptures were created to contemplate the global impact of each disease and to consider how the doctoring of scientific imagery affects our visualization of phenomena."
posted by dhruva on Sep 3, 2009 - 9 comments

ancient fragments become an emperor's new clothing

Clothes made of ceramic shards from the Ming, Yuan, Qing and Song Dynasties by Li Xiaofeng, a 43-year-old Beijing artist who has found a way to link his contemporary work with traditional Chinese 10th Century art. Some of the porcelain bits were salvaged from the roof tiles of the emperor’s palace. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Jul 5, 2009 - 12 comments

Iceland, beauty and deja vu

In the early 1980s, Roni Horn travelled to Iceland and lived alone for a few months in the (supposedly haunted) lighthouse at Dyrhólaey. While there, she made rocky, earthy drawings. They formed the first volume of a currently incomplete, abstract encyclopedia of the country [flash navigation] which has now progressed to include beautiful photographs of hot pools, glaciers, lava and rivers. A river's surface has appeared in different guises within a university. She has even made a library of water in a little Icelandic town. However, those currently in or near London can visit an exhibition in Tate Modern. [more inside]
posted by paperpete on Apr 4, 2009 - 7 comments

Desert Plants, Chihuly Glass

Nestled amid the red buttes of Papago Park in Phoenix, the Desert Botanical Garden hosts one of the world’s finest collections of desert plants. Home to 139 rare, threatened and endangered plant species from around the world, the Garden offers interesting and inspiring experiences, while their website offers gardening help including good growing guides. The Desert Botanical Garden has educational programming and research for children as well as adults. The internationally acclaimed living collection of over 20,000 desert plants, with particular emphasis on those inhabiting the Sonoran Desert, continues to serve the public and scientific community. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Feb 7, 2009 - 13 comments

Art is everywhere

Mingei is a transcultural word which combines the Japanese words for all people (Min) and art (Gei). The site has a flash interface and features over 5,000 high resolution, zoomable objects. More information on the Mingei Movement.
posted by tellurian on Jan 27, 2009 - 13 comments

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