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Science is beautiful...

In a new exhibition titled Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight, the British Library pays homage to the important role data visualization plays in the scientific process. The exhibition can be visited from 20 February until 26 May 2014, and contains works ranging from John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the Tree of Life. In a Nature Video, curator Johanna Kieniewicz explores some of the beautiful examples of visualizations that are exhibited.
[more inside]
posted by infini on Mar 3, 2014 - 1 comment

 

That's when you started graphing everything.

The 15 Best Behavioural Science Graphs of 2010-13. [more inside]
posted by aka burlap on Dec 21, 2013 - 4 comments

Graphing the Marvel Universe

"He calls this the Tao of Hawkeye. You can’t just have a database around Hawkeye, right? Not if you really want to understand Hawkeye over time. Because Hawkeye isn’t just Hawkeye. He’s also Ronin and Goliath and Clint Barton. Sometimes he’s dead. Oh, and by the way: he started as a villain. Who remembers that? -- Back in the eighties people like Mark Gruenwald and Peter Sanderson guarded Marvel Comics' continuity. These days Peter Olson tries to do the same for a much bigger Marvel using science and math.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 4, 2013 - 62 comments

Donut charts are mostly for decoration, right?

WTF Visualizations is a collection of charts and graphs that make no sense. Why settle for boring old bar charts and pie charts when you can use Percentacles, Timecentages, Interferograms, the Donut Ring Explosion or whatever this is?
posted by RobotHero on Sep 10, 2013 - 95 comments

Paperscape

Paperscape is a searchable 2-dimensional visualization of the 800,000+ scientific papers (mostly in physics and math) on the arXiv preprint server.
posted by escabeche on Aug 18, 2013 - 20 comments

The Disapproval Matrix

If you're facing criticism and are having trouble "separating haterade from productive feedback", you might Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix helpful, especially when it seems as though everyone's coming down on you.
posted by AccordionGuy on Apr 29, 2013 - 16 comments

Time Square Still Hell On Earth

So, which are the most used subway stops/lines in New York City anyway?
posted by The Whelk on Apr 11, 2013 - 32 comments

The Daily Viz

Matt Stiles is a data journalist for NPR. He tries each day to create a data visualization, or post those he finds online. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Mar 12, 2013 - 21 comments

Wonky graphs of 2012

2012: The year in graphs - as picked by the Washington Post Wonkblog's favorite economists, political scientist, politicians and other wonkys.
posted by Artw on Dec 28, 2012 - 17 comments

Buying useful things, like roads and universities and health care and solar energy and spaceships, should be better stimulus than fighting wars.

"Liberals have not always been very good at communicating why liberalism works. There’s many reasons for this, but part of it is that it can be hard to defend the obvious from an absurd and deceptive attack. For half a century you had to be a crank to oppose what Roosevelt accomplished; liberals got out of the habit of arguing for their beliefs. I hope this page will help. Liberals don’t need to apologize for their vision of how American society should work. Liberalism saved American capitalism and democracy, defeated Naziism, created a prosperous middle class, and benefited every sector of society, from the back streets to Wall Street. " Mefi's own Zompist (previously) on Why Liberalism Works.
posted by The Whelk on Sep 30, 2012 - 109 comments

Now, draw me a picture of the good life.

"Descartes is smaller than you’d think" in this graph of the history of philosophy [more inside]
posted by mc2000 on Jun 28, 2012 - 63 comments

Because Print Is Not Yet Dead

Free online graph paper generators: variations of squares, triangle, rhombus, and hexagonal, circular and polar, for drawing, gaming, writing, note-taking and much more. Blank Sheet Music (Flash) for all arrangements (PDF). Create and edit your own grids, probability and logarithmic graphs, petri-dish inserts and storyboards. Also, multilingual  monthly and yearly calendars. Plus, more than you ever wanted to know about ISO paper dimensions and printable paper models of polyhedra. Prev-ious-ly.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on May 28, 2012 - 36 comments

"Correlation may not imply causation, but it sure can help us insinuate it."

Correlation or Causation? Statistics are easy: All you need are two graphs and a leading question.
posted by beaucoupkevin on Dec 13, 2011 - 29 comments

I Have Your Infographic Right Here

How far above (or below) the average was the temperature and income in your state for the year you were conceived? A genealogy of US Airlines and a visual history of the TSA. See how the increasing severity and frequency of disasters is starting to strain the resources of FEMA (and where will the next big earthquake strike?). Alcohol vs. Marijuana. Facebook vs. Twitter. International travel and hotel prices for Americans and Canadians. How much does the US subsidize energy? And what would it look like if that energy was renewable? [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Sep 30, 2011 - 23 comments

Lots. Really, there are lots of photographs.

How many photographs are there?
posted by seanyboy on Sep 21, 2011 - 29 comments

Crayons under the spectrophotometer

Starting with a fresh box of twenty-four Crayola crayons I measured each with an i1 pro spectrophotometer to create a set of spectral power distributions (SPD) of the reflected light.
posted by rhapsodie on Sep 20, 2011 - 19 comments

Hollywood Career-o-Matic

A visitor to the Rotten Tomatoes site can check out the data for individual Hollywood careers—that's how Tabarrok came up with the Shyamalan graph—but there's no easy way for users to measure industrywide trends or to compare different actors and directors side-by-side. To that end, Rotten Tomatoes kindly let Slate analyze the scores in its enormous database and create an interactive tool so our readers might do the same.
posted by Trurl on Jun 7, 2011 - 69 comments

Ben Greenman’s Museum of Silly Charts

Ben Greenman’s Museum of Silly Charts.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on May 12, 2011 - 14 comments

Talking fast and making cool videos does not mean learning is happening

So you're me and you're in math class and you're learning about graph theory, a subject too interesting to be included in most grade school's curricula so maybe you're in some special program or maybe you're in college and were somehow not scarred for life by your grade school math teachers. [more inside]
posted by achmorrison on Feb 22, 2011 - 32 comments

How Long is Babby Formed?

"Normal" human pregnancies last 40 weeks, right? Well, no; they can vary quite a bit by the mother's race, age, number of previous children, family history of delivering early or late, home state, work habits, and even the fetus' HLA type. So where does that "40 week" thing come from? Oh, dear. So check out this super-nerdy pregnancy statistics website, from an engineer mom who is collecting data from the public (see the raw data and auto-generated graphs, and read the FAQ about the survey, with more cool graphs). Looking for day-by-day probabilities on when that baby's due? This would be your stats table with daily prediction (adjust dates at top of page as needed). Of course, you could always shut up your constantly inquiring relatives and friends another way.
posted by Asparagirl on Dec 16, 2010 - 45 comments

Junk Charts

Junk Charts and its "sister blog", Numbers Rule the World, are long-running sites with trenchant critiques of the visual and textual display of information in media. Both are instructive for decoding the information glut, as well as getting your own messages across clearly. See for example, posts on display of census information and race; Trying Too Hard; and Over Plotting.
posted by Rumple on Oct 11, 2010 - 5 comments

Charting the Beatles

Exploration of Beatles music through infographics.
posted by chillmost on Jan 19, 2010 - 92 comments

Does your son's name end with the letter "n"?

Andrew Gelman recently posted this strange trend in baby naming originally posted on Laura Wattenberg's blog in 2007. Why do so many boys' names now end with the letter "n"?
posted by srs on May 14, 2009 - 156 comments

A blame game of language and depth-first search.

"It's all {Greek -> Chinese -> Heavenly Script} to me." Mark Liberman, on Language Log, recently did some quick research on how other languages would say "It's Greek to me." And created a directed graph of his findings, which were then supplemented with reader comments.
posted by shadytrees on Jan 15, 2009 - 49 comments

Missed Connections

Missed Connections by state A map showing missed connections for Craigslist, by state and gender breakdown, for approximately the last two weeks by Very Small Array.
posted by ugf on Jan 9, 2009 - 57 comments

Craigstistics

Craigslistindex graphs data pulled from Craigslist listings. [more inside]
posted by Korou on Sep 11, 2008 - 13 comments

Lies, damned lies, and graphs

Graph your life at MIT's Mycrocosm. Simple interface. Interesting potential. Worrying about. Freelance: No Idea What the Hell Is Going On. Food and Liquid Consumption. Also allows for sharing datasets with other users.
posted by artifarce on Sep 8, 2008 - 10 comments

Ooh, look at all the pretty data.

Stream graphs, or stacked graphs, are a new form of (sometimes interactive) visualization that present data in a fluid timescale format. For example, the NY Times website has a graph showing the box office receipts from 1996-2008. There's a Twitter streamgraph based on keywords. Here's one of all the musicians a Last.fm user has listened to over time. Track the popularity of baby names back to the 1880s. Possibly the most striking, if not necessarily intuitive, is this visualization of US population by county, 1790-2000. There's already an academic study of the technique.
posted by desjardins on Jul 31, 2008 - 27 comments

Graphjam

Graphjam: Pop Culture for People in Cubicles.
posted by saladin on Apr 7, 2008 - 23 comments

Visualize this...

Dozens of the web's best visualization tools. Neat choices include TuneGlue's music map using data from Amazon and last.fm, Packetgarden's weird world grown from your websurfing habits, Akamai's real-time network visualization, the many widgets of last.fm, the hypnotic maps of the mood of blogs from We Feel Fine, the beautiful galleries of Visual Complexity, and a neat list of tools for drawing diagrams. [some prev]
posted by blahblahblah on Mar 14, 2008 - 8 comments

Indexed on US Politics

Jessica Hagy, author of indexed (previously) covers the 2008 Presidential Election for McClatchy's "alt.campaign" site.
posted by whir on Dec 7, 2007 - 7 comments

A Study in the Trickyness Involved in Rocking a Rhyme

Rap represented in mathematical charts and graphs.
posted by 31d1 on Nov 9, 2007 - 66 comments

Countries that look like their Phillips curve

Some countries are shaped like their economic Phillips curve. Japan bears a strong resemblance to its Phillips curve. The Czech Republic does too, a little. And Canada’s similarity to its Phillips curve it less obvious, but it’s still there.
posted by tepidmonkey on Nov 4, 2007 - 21 comments

x is the new y

Contrived is the new original. via.
posted by signal on Mar 10, 2007 - 38 comments

Le Grand Content

Le Grand Content (embedded QT) is a short film inspired by the (previously mentioned) awesome charts-as-life-descriptors blog Indexed (and in fact, found via that site). More on the project here.
posted by jonson on Jan 15, 2007 - 6 comments

Graphs of US federal revenue and spending

Mark Wieczorek has put together some graphs of US federal revenue and spending and the US trade deficit, with a minimum of editorializing. They're shown using nominal dollars, real (inflation-adjusted) dollars, and as a percentage of GDP.
posted by russilwvong on Jul 11, 2006 - 33 comments

Graphs Maps Trees

Graphs, Maps, Trees. The Valve is hosting a literary event for professor Franco Moretti's new book, Graphs, Maps, Trees. Moretti aims to reinvigorate literary studies by constructing abstract models based upon quantitative history, geography, and evolutionary theory. PDFs of the original articles: Graphs, Maps, Trees. A review at n+1 is here.
posted by painquale on Jan 13, 2006 - 10 comments

Everything looks better with a graph

My awesomeness is at an all time high, as this chart will clearly demonstrate. And thanks to the magical people at Bellygraph.com, I can create & update charts to illustrate all the trends that matter to me, from my own personal awesomeness to total number of pugs owned or whatever other metric I choose.
posted by jonson on Jan 12, 2006 - 29 comments

Do you look like your race?

Face Analyzer Just upload a picture of your face and get feedback on what ethnicity you most resemble and a physiognomatic breakdown of your personality.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Jun 8, 2005 - 73 comments

Alterslash

Alterslash takes all the hard work out of reading Slashdot. On a single page, it compiles the day's headlines, along with the top five rated comments on each, and graphs the signal % over time for each thread. Think of it as an automatic digest, showing just the best of Slashdot, each day.
posted by mathowie on Jan 25, 2002 - 15 comments

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