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15 posts tagged with graveyard.
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There Will Come Soft Rains

For decades the Golpa-Nord open-pit mine was scoured by gigantic machines day and night. When the coal ran out, the enormous steel constructs - with names like Mad Max, Big Wheel, and Medusa - were left in place. Today, the abandoned machines form the remarkable city of Ferropolis. Much more at Urban Ghosts.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jun 8, 2012 - 17 comments

Get off my cemetery lawn

For a mere $65, headstone maker Quiring Monuments will add a QR barcode to a cemetery headstone and run a linked web site for five years. A Seattle cemetery manager says he is considering adding the codes to historical monuments and even trees.
posted by grouse on Aug 1, 2011 - 54 comments

Mauritanian shipwrecks

Some pictures from the world's largest ship graveyard at Nouadhibou in Mauritania (click 'here', then 'nouadhibou' in the Jan Smith link), or investigate it in Google Maps. Geographical Magazine has an explanation of how the graveyard came about.
posted by Dim Siawns on Nov 16, 2010 - 22 comments

Crossbones Graveyard

Crossbones Graveyard (YT) is a disused graveyard in Southwark, London. Lying outside the old city walls, it became the last resting place for 15,000 paupers and prostitutes (the latter known as the 'Winchester Geese' because they were licensed by the Bishop of Winchester). The history of Crossbones is being rediscovered by local playwright John Constable, and is becoming a place of pilgrimage to remember the outcasts in London society (audio/slide). A ritual is held there every Halloween.
posted by carter on Oct 31, 2010 - 8 comments

The Google Graveyard

Let's take a walk through the Google graveyard.
posted by Joe Beese on Aug 18, 2010 - 45 comments

"It would seem highly unlikely that this individual was attacked by a tiger as he was walking home from the pub in York 2,000 years ago."

One arm was bigger than the other in many remains—a suggestion that the men were gladiators who trained from a young age with a weapon in one hand. Archaeologists discover the world's best-preserved Roman gladiator cemetery in York, England. [more inside]
posted by zoomorphic on Jun 9, 2010 - 42 comments

I'll never let go

Archaeologists find graveyard of sunken Roman ships. Information on how such a shipwreck is discovered available from the Aurora Trust site.
posted by shakespeherian on Jul 24, 2009 - 12 comments

Lost Tribes of the Green Sahara

Lost Tribes of the Green Sahara. "How a dinosaur hunter uncovered the Sahara's strangest Stone Age graveyard."
posted by homunculus on Aug 16, 2008 - 9 comments

Decaying photos

Decaying memorial photos at the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow.
posted by parudox on Apr 11, 2008 - 14 comments

The Graveyard

The Graveyard: Walk through the graveyard. Sit for a spell. Walk back out again. [via Jay Is Games] [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Mar 22, 2008 - 15 comments

A grave situation

ukgraves.info has thousands of photographs of cemeteries and gravestones all over the UK, from City of London to the Kirk of Lammermuir, and random points in between.
posted by dersins on Nov 14, 2007 - 11 comments

Boatyard of Broken Dreams

Staten Island Ship Graveyard. A fascinating gallery of photographs of abandoned and decaying ships.
posted by dersins on Oct 10, 2005 - 20 comments

Derelicts vs. Cannibals

Planes check in but they don’t check out. At boneyards across the country, derelict airliners await cannibalization, destruction, or possible restoration.
posted by breezeway on Mar 30, 2005 - 26 comments

The Elephant's Graveyard

Goodbye, Norma Jean. Norma the elephant was killed by a stroke of lightning. Seventy years earlier, though, Topsy was electrocuted by Thomas Edison, to "demonstrate" the danger of alternating current. Only a few years later, Mary was sentenced to death by hanging, to the amusement and edification of onlookers. It's rough being an elephant in America.
posted by SPrintF on Jun 13, 2004 - 11 comments

The green book of death

Where Iraq's desaparecidos wound up. This is about Iraq, but it's not about the war. It's about a graveyard, its manager, and his "awful green book." The reporter is an Arab, which makes a difference, as you can see in the striking last sentence of this paragraph:
All of the dissidents buried at the Kirkh Islamic Cemetery were once held at Abu Ghreib prison, the country's largest and most notorious jail, from which Hussein released nearly 10,000 inmates last October. When word of their release came, the prisoners—from petty thieves to political dissidents, and all kept in horrendous conditions—overran the guards and stampeded the iron gates. Abu Ghreib is also the name given to Iraqi fathers who no longer have children.

posted by languagehat on Apr 23, 2003 - 9 comments

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