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11 posts tagged with herge.
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Fodder for your Amazon wishlist

Windsor McCay was one of the first superstars of the American comics strip, a pioneer in both cartooning and animation, massively prolific. All of his work is in the public domain, but where to start? Over at Robot 6, Chris Mautner provides the lowdown in the first installment of a new series of Comics College, "a monthly feature where we provide an introductory guide to some of the medium’s most important auteurs and offer our best educated suggestions on how to become familiar with their body of work". [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 6, 2013 - 26 comments

Spielberg's adventures of Hergé

Everything you always wanted to know about The Adventures of Tintin
posted by Artw on Feb 3, 2013 - 25 comments

Cor!

Shining Examples of European Comic Book Covers
posted by infini on May 4, 2012 - 34 comments

Clear lines

On the afterlife of Tintin. Via 3 AM.
posted by latkes on Jan 1, 2012 - 20 comments

Nadim Damluji, Tintinologist

Hello! My name is Nadim Damluji and I am an aspiring Tintinologist. Nadim Damluji received a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, and just finished a year of blogging and retracing Tintin's steps in Belgium, France, Egypt, United Arab Emirates, Taiwan and China to study Hergé's famous series as a form of Orientalism. [more inside]
posted by Corduroy on Oct 21, 2011 - 14 comments

In and Out of History: Tintin and Hergé

"To really write for children, you have to think like a child. And to read a children’s book, you probably have to let go of grown-up reasoning. These thoughts occurred to me as I read two newly-translated books about Tintin and his creator, Georges Remi, better known to the world as Hergé. (The pen name is composed of Remi’s initials backwards, pronounced as in French.) There is much to be learned from these studies and others by “Tintinologists”—about Hergé, about the “world” of Tintin, even about twentieth-century politics. But as I read Pierre Assouline’s well-written biography of Hergé and Jean-Marie Apostolidès’s erudite study of the Tintin books, a version of the question we Jews love to ask kept coming to mind: Are they good for Tintin?" A review of The Metamorphoses of Tintin or Tintin for Adults by Jean-Marie Apostolides and Herge: The Man Who Created Tintin by Pierre Assouline at The New Republic.
posted by ocherdraco on Feb 4, 2010 - 17 comments

Keeping us safe from racist literature

The Brooklyn Public Library reshelves a children's book—behind locked steel doors
posted by Toekneesan on Aug 20, 2009 - 78 comments

The Adventures of Tintin

Travels of a Boy Reporter - Track Tintin's travels across the globe. Click on the map to find out more about the locations or books they appear in.
posted by Artw on May 22, 2009 - 23 comments

But do you pronounce it "Tan Tan"?

Happy Birthday Tintin, whatever your sexuality! (maybe you're just confused)
posted by Artw on Jan 11, 2009 - 79 comments

Blistering barnacles!

But is it art? Apparently so - A page of original Tintin artwork by Belgian artist Hergé becomes part of the Pompidou Centre's permanent collection of Modern Art, the first comics artwork to do so despite Frances vibrant comics culture.
posted by Artw on May 22, 2008 - 18 comments

I'm f*cking Tintin, I am.

Yeah, you better walk away before you get a couple of fucking slaps! You know who I am? I'm fucking Tintin, mate, alright?
posted by slimepuppy on Jun 13, 2007 - 31 comments

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