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6 posts tagged with howl. (View popular tags)
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awoooooooooooo!!

Puppies Learning To Howl
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 22, 2013 - 35 comments

LEAF FROLIC

Nobody loves leaves more than this dog. (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by elizardbits on Sep 21, 2013 - 50 comments

Bookseller/Zine Publisher/Free Speech Hero

"Born Shigeyoshi Murao in 1926, he was universally known as Shig. His playful demeanor—not to mention his signature beard, Pendleton shirts, Royal Air Force exercise vest, horn-rimmed glasses, and bowler—rendered him unforgettable. But that did not make him easy to know. Shig, who died in 1999, is largely remembered for an event that occurred on June 3, 1957, when two undercover agents from the San Francisco Police Juvenile Squad showed up at City Lights to buy a seventy-five-cent book of poetry." [more inside]
posted by Toekneesan on Oct 5, 2011 - 10 comments

Wolfman

Shaun Ellis is a wolf behavior expert who raises abandoned wolf cubs and teaches them, by example, the basics of being a wolf. Here he is teaching wolf cubs how to howl. He's also been experimenting with using recordings of howling to protect farms and livestock from wolves. Awwwooooo!
posted by homunculus on Sep 17, 2008 - 36 comments

A Howl that went unheard for over 50 years

For more than 50 years, it was believed that the first recording Allen Ginsberg made of Howl was in Berkeley in March 1956. Now, an earlier recording – made on Valentine's Day 1956 at Reed College, Portland, Oregon – has been found. Reed have made it – along with seven other poems Ginsberg read the same night – available here. (Click on "Allen Ginsberg reads ..." for drop down menu; apologies for crappy quicktime interface.)
posted by Len on Feb 15, 2008 - 27 comments

"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness..."

Too Hot To Hear. Fifty years ago today, a San Francisco Municipal Court judge ruled that Allen Ginsberg's Beat-era poem "Howl" was not obscene. Yet today, a New York public broadcasting station decided not to air the poem, fearing that the Federal Communications Commission will find it indecent and crush the network with crippling fines. More on Allen Ginsberg here. Via.
posted by amyms on Oct 5, 2007 - 69 comments

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