4 posts tagged with html and dom.
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Twitter Bootstrap For Beginners

Bootstrap is Twitter's toolkit for creating rich and more consistent web interfaces across browsers and devices. The Bootstrap ecosystem offers, among other things, an iconic font, themes, a customization generator, themes for Wordpress / Drupal + / Joomla, templates for Fireworks / Photoshop, a button generator and a jQuery UI theme. How to get started? Check out this tutorial or this series or even this. Built With Bootstrap has lots of examples on how developers are putting Bootstrap to good use.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jun 5, 2012 - 31 comments

Like a manpage for the web

Over the past several years, Mozilla's collection of developer documentation for its own web browsers has turned into a wiki-editable reference of web standards for developers working with all browsers, hosting a comprehensive, no-nonsense reference of HTML, HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, the DOM, and more. If you find yourself turning to this reference frequently, dochub provides instant access to Mozilla's documentation for any HTML, CSS, JavaScript, or DOM-related topic. If you're worried that a fancy new standard might not work in an older browser, canIuse will tell you exactly how many browsers will support that new standard. Still want to use that shiny new standard? Modernizr and yepnope will let you detect missing features, and load tiny bits of code to make old browsers support the latest HTML5 hotness.
[via the carefully-curated selections of JavaScript and HTML5 Weekly, run by MetaFilter's own wackybrit]
posted by schmod on Dec 7, 2011 - 23 comments

Layer displayer

Tilt is a Firefox add-on that lets you visualize a web page's DOM (document object model) in 3D. In effect, you can see all the layers in a web page stacked upon each other with this. [more inside]
posted by ignignokt on Oct 30, 2011 - 53 comments

Playing with Dark Magic

What the Heck is Shadow DOM? Browser developers realized that coding the appearance and behavior of HTML elements completely by hand is a) hard and b) silly. So they sort of cheated. They created a boundary between what you, the Web developer can reach and what’s considered implementation details, thus inaccessible to you. The browser however, can traipse across this boundary at will.
posted by netbros on Jan 18, 2011 - 38 comments

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