7 posts tagged with html5 and chrome.
Displaying 1 through 7 of 7. Subscribe:

HTML5 Exploit

FillDisk -- HTML5 permits websites to store considerable data on your local disk. It was originally expected that the browsers would impose a ceiling on this, but IE, Opera, Safari, and Chrome do not. A properly coded HTML5 site can completely fill your hard drive. [more inside]
posted by Chocolate Pickle on Mar 1, 2013 - 28 comments

What it is is Beautiful.

Build Lego onto a Google Map [more inside]
posted by azarbayejani on Jun 26, 2012 - 13 comments

How Google (and Rovio) Ported Angry Birds to HTML5

Joel Webber, a Google engineer who created the Google Web Toolkit and is working on the new Dart language, gave an incredibly detailed hour and a half talk about how Angry Birds was ported to HTML5 for the Chrome app store.
posted by jenkinsEar on Dec 28, 2011 - 14 comments

ro.me if you want to

ro.me A new Google Chrome experiment showcasing WebGL.
posted by ryoshu on May 12, 2011 - 25 comments

HTML 5 Circus

Mozilla's HTML 5 Circus rolls into town. The emergence of HTML 5 is marked by, among others, emerging browsers (or browser versions). The soon to be released Firefox 4, often delayed, mirrors the slow march to an HTML 5 Flash reduced web. Like others, Mozilla feels the need to sell HTML 5. We also have Chrome Experiments, Canvas Demos, IE HTML 5 demos and Never Mind the Bullets, and Apple's (warning: sniffer protected) HTML 5 showcase. [more inside]
posted by juiceCake on Mar 6, 2011 - 102 comments

Video Wars, round II

We expect even more rapid innovation in the web media platform in the coming year and are focusing our investments in those technologies that are developed and licensed based on open web principles. To that end, we are changing Chrome’s HTML5 <video> support to make it consistent with the codecs already supported by the open Chromium project. Specifically, we are supporting the WebM (VP8) and Theora video codecs, and will consider adding support for other high-quality open codecs in the future. Though H.264 plays an important role in video, as our goal is to enable open innovation, support for the codec will be removed and our resources directed towards completely open codec technologies. - Google's Chrome is will be joining Firefox in no longer licensing the MPEG-LA H.264 video codec favoured by Apple and Microsoft for use in the HTML5 <video> tag (previously). Not everyone is seeing this as a good thing.
posted by Artw on Jan 13, 2011 - 145 comments

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web (SLH5P) Warning: A modern browser is required. [more inside]
posted by purephase on Nov 18, 2010 - 80 comments

Page: 1