601 posts tagged with illustration.
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"How to Become Famous on the Internet"

The memorable URL damn.dog hides a game where you try to guess the titles of WikiHow articles by one of their illustrations.
posted by JHarris on Apr 10, 2016 - 28 comments

Animal Families

Animal Families - A collection of animal illustrations that explore the relationship of parent and child. By artist Michael Sutton.
posted by Wolfdog on Jan 30, 2016 - 3 comments

What if Doctor Seuss channeled H.P. Lovecraft?

The Call of Cthulhu (for beginning readers)
posted by fings on Jan 30, 2016 - 25 comments

STR-DEX-CON-INT-WIS-CHA-ART

Concept artist Tom Rhodes asks fans to submit detailed descriptions of their RPG characters. He then illustrates a random selection each week on RnD Fantasy. [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Jan 4, 2016 - 13 comments

Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery

In 1796, Jane Austen visited John Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery. The museum (operational from 1789-1805) was entirely devoted to specially-commissioned paintings of scenes from Shakespeare's plays, and played a significant role in shaping the dramatist's reputation during the late eighteenth century. This reconstruction of the gallery includes the catalog and the paintings that would have been hanging there in 1796 (the museum's collection ultimately included well over 150 paintings). For more information on the gallery, see the Folger Library's Marketing Shakespeare. The Romantic Illustration Network is working on digitizing extant engravings of the gallery's entire collection. Visitors to the gallery were themselves painted in 1790.
posted by thomas j wise on Dec 17, 2015 - 4 comments

An illustrator in Dali, China

Jason Pym is a British illustrator who has been living in Dali, China for 11 years. His love for his adopted city in an idyllic part of Yunnan province is plain to see. He also makes illustrations for Penguin Books China, and labels for his wife's homemade jam, featuring cos-playing dragons. (Here's a link in Chinese with more dragon-goodness.)
posted by of strange foe on Dec 10, 2015 - 7 comments

Cosplay for Traditional Geeks

Malaysian illustrator Charis Loke designs geek culture-inspired traditional South/South East Asian outfits, primarily baju kurung and kebaya. Some of her inspirations include Tolkein, Pacific Rim, Watchmen, and the Hunger Games.
posted by divabat on Nov 12, 2015 - 10 comments

Eyebrow game strong!

Charlotte Brontë sketch identified as self-portrait. [The Guardian]
A sketch of a woman’s head by Charlotte Brontë, previously thought to be of another pupil drawn while the author was at boarding school in Brussels, has been identified as a self-portrait. The literary biographer Claire Harman said the drawing, which she suggests shows Brontë looking into a mirror, preceded the novel Jane Eyre, in which the protagonist also draws herself in a similar fashion. The sketch dates from 1843, four years before Brontë published Jane Eyre, one of English literature’s great masterpieces, and when the young writer was suffering the agonies and insecurities of unrequited love.
posted by Fizz on Oct 27, 2015 - 13 comments

The (mostly) limbless magician, penman, musician of the 18th Century

Matthias Buchinger, sometimes called Matthew Buckinger, described himself as "the wonderful Little Man of but 29 inches high, born without Hands, Feet, or Thighs." Despite being born (in Germany in 1674) with limbs "more resembling fins of a fish than arms of a man," he was renowned for his works as a calligrapher and micrographer (remarked for details illustrated in psalms written in characters of different sizes), builder of whimsey bottles (the oldest known "mining bottle"), and called the most extraordinary conjurer of all time. People may have initially gathered to see a tragedy, but instead were presented with an astounding range of impressive skills. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 8, 2015 - 6 comments

Kim Jung Gi is fast on the draw

Check out Kim Jung Gi doing a quick sketch - most impressive.
posted by zeoslap on Sep 21, 2015 - 16 comments

A Butterfly Journey

A 17th-Century Woman Artist’s Butterfly Journey Despite her long career, her influence on contemporary natural knowledge, her vivid descriptions of distant Suriname, and her intrepid spirit, when she died in 1717 the city of Amsterdam’s register of deaths described her simply as a woman “without means.”
posted by Michele in California on Sep 13, 2015 - 9 comments

Some of these comics sold hundreds of thousands

Here, from the cool cats at Mister Kitty, is Stupid Comics, covering all the finest in terrible artwork and regrettable writing. Here's a very small portion of what awaits you: Teenage Mutant Ninja Ripoffs - Madam Satan - Badly Drawn Anime Heroine Skye Blue and more pseudo-manga - Lois Lane marries Astounding Man - Kissing Canvas - Badly drawn 80s comics: The Protectors - How To Publish (bad TMNT knockoff) Comics - I Can't Believe It's Not Archie: 1, 2, 3, 4 - Vampire Girls (prob NSFW) - OMG GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY - The Human Race - "You've got the wrong Lincoln there!" - Faux-go - Sexy Jaguar Adventures (NSFW) - Comics Advisor - Reggie Mantle actually flips a bird [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Sep 12, 2015 - 19 comments

“Coal-black is better than another hue,”

Vengeance, Death, Blood, and Revenge by Dan Piepenbring [The Paris Review] Leonard Baskin’s grotesque etchings of William Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. Below are some of the highlights to his Andronicus etchings—he made twenty-four in all. You can see more at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, which has a number of Baskin’s works in their collection. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 22, 2015 - 9 comments

Ralph and Friends

Ralph Steadman (previously here), the illustrator best known for his collaborations with Hunter S. Thompson, has illustrated other people's books, notably some newer editions of older volumes: Alice in Wonderland (previously here, but with dead links), George Orwell's Animal Farm, and Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, not as well known because the edition was limited to 451 copies, all autographed by both Bradbury and Steadman. He has also written and illustrated I, Leonardo, an "imaginary autobiography" of Leonardo DaVinci, adding more centuries to his historical reach.
Trigger Warning: Large Quantities of Visual Gonzo-ness
posted by oneswellfoop on Aug 13, 2015 - 14 comments

I can give you a tour. I think you look lovely tonight. I'm a gift.

Sophia Foster-Dimino is an illustrator and cartoonist.
Foster-Dimino’s ability to articulate very specific, very familiar, rarely articulated emotional sensations is uncanny here. (...) “Have you noticed that loving someone is like pouring water into a well,” asks the frenemy. “You don’t pour water into a well you get water out of a well,” protests the protagonist, now crying. “Your lover is a deep dark delicious well & you’re nothing but a bucket,” her tormenter responds without missing a beat. “Not even a cool bucket,” she continues, “a lackluster ordinary bucket—that feels so heavy but holds so little.” To be blunt, fuuuuuuuck.
[more inside] posted by glass origami robot on Aug 7, 2015 - 13 comments

Demons For Dummies Ca. 1775

"A selection of pages from an 18th-century demonology book comprised of more than 30 exquisite watercolours showing various demon figures, as well as magic and cabbalistic signs. The full Latin title of Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, roughly translates to “A rare summary of the entire Magical Art by the most famous Masters of this Art”. With a title page adorned with skeletons and the warning of Noli me tangere (Do not touch me), one quickly gets a sense of the dark oddities lurking inside its pages." - The Public Domain Review presents illustrations from a 18th century guide to demons and demonology (NSFW illustrated nudity, snakes on bits.)
posted by The Whelk on Jun 30, 2015 - 29 comments

Walter Molino's Worst Case Scenerios

Illustator Walter Molino had an unusually spot-on take of the situations that would provoke maximum anxiety in his viewers.... provided his viewers were terrified of lions. Many parents dread the moment their toddler has to cling to the bumper of a runaway car, or , God forbid, has to fend off an angry lion, or a Nessie,. But who hasn't had a moment of doubt regarding our tightrope walking partner?
posted by biddeford on Jun 10, 2015 - 34 comments

Clowes Encounter - A conversation with cartoonist Daniel Clowes

Clowes Encounter: an extended interview with Ghost World and Eightball writer/illustrator Daniel Clowes. [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Apr 30, 2015 - 5 comments

"What could be nicer? I draw funny pictures and people send me money."

Roy Doty, awesome illustrator, particularly known for drawing the popular, 50-year-running Wordless Workshop instructional comic strip for Popular Science, Family Handyman and syndication, the puzzle page for Make, and also the covers and illustrations for popular Judy Blume books Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, Superfudge and Otherwise Known As Shelia The Great, among many other things, has died at 92. This episode of the Danny Dee Show (YouTube 27m) shows off his drawing and narration skills. Here's some illustrations from his website. Here's a sample panel of Wordless Workshop. [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Mar 20, 2015 - 19 comments

"I Think It's Time. Again."

25 years after first seeing light as a 6-page story in RAW(Prev), Richard McGuire expanded his time and space-spanning Here to a 300-page novel. In Five Dials Magazine's 35th issue, Richard McGuire Makes a Book, "sketches, notes, phrases, inspirations, paintings, lists and photo collages used to create the essential Here," are presented for your enjoyment and edification. [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Feb 9, 2015 - 4 comments

Find eyes within, look for the door into the unknown country

The life of Pamela Coleman Smith: actor, illustrator, set designer, hermetic occultist, possibly-queer black woman, synesthete, suffragist, and unsung designer of the famous Rider-Waite tarot deck. [more inside]
posted by nebulawindphone on Dec 11, 2014 - 13 comments

Santa as you may never have seen him before

A disturbing collection of late nineteenth to early twentieth century Christmas cards. "He knows if you've been bad or good. For his part, he's been exclusively bad."
posted by orange swan on Dec 10, 2014 - 30 comments

Sleepless in Shanghai

Shanghai Tango - Whimsical illustrations.
posted by unliteral on Nov 25, 2014 - 8 comments

Shark Cats, portraits of terror

"It was a normal day when I grabbed my sketchpad and began to doodle. What came out was little scribbles of a horrible little creature: the Shark Cat. The initial design was based on the thresher shark. I found that the short face and extremely large eyes worked well with the cat aesthetic. However, as I kept sketching, I noticed that almost any shark species could be adapted." Shark Cats, portraits of terror, by concept artist/illustrator Brynn Metheney, who has more work on her Instagram account. (Not to be confused with the cat in a shark costume on a Roomba, previously).
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 23, 2014 - 17 comments

Hexels, Brixels, Pixels, Crystals, Circles, Wiggles, Diagonal, and Zeez!

Hexels is a unique grid-based art tool for PC and OS X that has garnered some acclaim from game developers for its retro digital aesthetic. See what people are making in Hexels, or try it yourself for free. [more inside]
posted by buriednexttoyou on Nov 5, 2014 - 12 comments

Water color and computer concept illustrations by Tucker Cullinan

Tucker Cullinan is a concept artist whose styles span vivid organic/sci-fi scenes in water colors and lost worlds from the imaginary past, to colder, sharp-edged futuristic worlds, and computer illustrations of imaginary prototypes. More on his blog and his portfolio site, plus two interviews.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2014 - 2 comments

Doggie Drawings!

Dogs of the World: adorable illustrations of dog breeds, grouped by the regions where they originated.
By Lili Chin, whose Doggie Drawings include numerous infographics on dog training and behavior. Some examples: Greeting a Dog, Space Etiquette for Dogs, Positive Reinforcement Training, How to Create a Dangerous Dog.
Wondering about the Boston Terrier who keeps popping up in these infographics? Meet Boogie.
posted by Metroid Baby on Sep 26, 2014 - 15 comments

xylem never looked so good

V Martineau Illustration: The Miracle of Trees, Sciencia Illustrations, Levels Of Complexity, Plants, The Paper Birch Tree, Why The Sky Is Far Away [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 27, 2014 - 4 comments

Beauty itself doth of itself persuade The eyes of men without an orator.

Folger Shakespeare Library Releases 80,000 Images for Creative Common Use. The Folger Shakespeare Library announced yesterday, that they have released the contents of their Digital Image Collection under a Creative Commons Share-Alike (CC-BY-SA) license. Full database can be accessed here.
posted by Fizz on Aug 13, 2014 - 18 comments

Where there are no people

Animal Land where there are no people was a children's book released in 1897, written by Sybil Corbet, who was four years old, and illustrated by her mother, Katharine Corbet. "Animal Land where there are no People is quite near, only you can't see it... They live by the North Pole and in the leafy places near. It is always light there, always day, they climb the poles and always play." [more inside]
posted by dng on Jul 18, 2014 - 6 comments

Illustrated Skills of the Traveller, Physician, Sailor, Martial Artist

The Art of Shen Ku is a rambling, eccentric website displaying pages of an illustrated instructional book of the same name. The site is roughly divided into four topics: Traveller, Physician, Sailor, and Martial Artist. It features heavily notated illustrations that demonstrate everything from using healthy breathing techniques and using aloe vera to learning martial art hand strikes, avoiding shark attacks, making survival shelters, and navigating. The author, Zeek, seems to be a sailor who spent much time in Asia. [more inside]
posted by ShanShen on Jul 17, 2014 - 10 comments

Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

"I draw with paper instead of on it"

Yulia Brodskaya is a Russian artist/illustrator now living in England whose quilled paper pieces are increasingly in demand. Her website is rich with her work - jump right into the illustration or art sectons - or browse the news section to see a roughly reverse chronological listing. Design Taxi has collected a group of images highlighting her quilled typography. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 4, 2014 - 7 comments

Also Monster Haikus

Childhood - a hand-bound book of Japanese styled illustrations paying homage to nostalgic activities and toys. From artist Chet Phillips.
posted by Lou Stuells on Jun 17, 2014 - 6 comments

"On a cloud I saw a child, and he laughing said to me…"

The book is considered the rarest of Sendak’s published work — so rare that it’s practically impossible for even art historians to get their eyes on a copy for scholarly work. To commemorate the 86th birthday of Maurice Sendak (previously), Maria Popova (previously) has published scans of illustrations Sendak did for an ultra-ultra-rare edition of William Blake's Songs of Innocence.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 10, 2014 - 13 comments

Pat Perry

Pat Perry's surreal sketchbook and surreal art [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jun 5, 2014 - 7 comments

J.C. Leyendecker

Before Rockwell, a Gay Artist Defined the Perfect American Male. [more inside]
posted by bibliogrrl on Jun 5, 2014 - 42 comments

SAN値さがるぞぉぉぉぉー!

Yamada Gouki (山田剛毅), aka goking, has been illustrating creatures from the Cthulhu Mythos and similar horrors in an ukiyo-e style: Cyaegha, Igolnaku, The Thing That Plays with Fate, Cthonian, Byakhee, and would like to wish you a very Merry Fishmas from Innsmouth. You can find more illustrations on his Twitter or his blog, 2D6. [more inside]
posted by 23 on May 29, 2014 - 11 comments

poop should be renamed “doof,” since that is food backwards

Cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt shadows chef Wylie Dufresne for a day.
posted by moonmilk on Apr 17, 2014 - 27 comments

Protein Packing

Harvard University and XVIVO have come together again (Previouslyw/ a commercial focus, Previouslierw/an Academic focus) to add to the growing series of scientific animations for BioVisions -- Harvard's multimedia lab in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. 'Protein Packing' strives to more accurately depict the molecular chaos in each and every cell, with proteins jittering around in what may seem like random motion. Proteins occupy roughly 40% of the cytoplasm, creating an environment that risks unintentional interaction and aggregation. Via diffusion and motor protein transport, these molecules are directed to sites where they are needed.
Much of this is no doubt inspired by the beautiful art and explained illustrations of David Goodsell, a biologist at Scripps who has been accurately portraying the crowdedness of the cellular landscape for a long time now.
[more inside] posted by Blasdelb on Apr 10, 2014 - 9 comments

Rooms within rooms, endless cities and labyrinthine structures

"I hope that a viewer will be able to put themselves in my spaces. To that end I’ve avoided adding any figures of any kind to inhabit the rooms, so the viewer is free to imagine themselves inhabiting them if they choose. Some people find them claustrophobic, others want to linger. The detail draws in the viewer, though I’ve also seen it repel the odd person. I enjoy the combination of the creepy and the whimsical. Perhaps this boils down to wanting my drawings to be haunted in the same way that my dreams locales often feel haunted." Excerpt from an interview with Matthew Borrett, an artist/illustrator who draws black and white rooms, scenes from unreal worlds, and some more realistic settings.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 9, 2014 - 7 comments

What Kind of Pen Do You Use? Also, What Cartoon Character Would You Be?

David Wasting Paper queries 200+ illustrators, comic book, strip, gag, and editorial cartoonists on their trade, tools, favorite things, and more in his compulsively readable Cartoonist Survey(s) [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Mar 9, 2014 - 3 comments

"I guess I’m an artist. That’s my super power."

A short and sweet 10-minute documentary on musician and artist Daniel Johnston. [SLYT] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 6, 2014 - 14 comments

Lunchbox Doodles

"Q: What is the story behind Lunchbox Doodles and how long have you been doing it? A: It really started as a result of the fond memories I have of opening my lunch at school and reading notes my mother would place inside. While I can't remember specifically what they said, they had an impact on me. They served as a reminder that my parents were thinking of me even when I wasn't with them."
posted by ColdChef on Feb 26, 2014 - 9 comments

The Made Up Words Project

The Made Up Words Project is an on-going undertaking by illustrator Rinee Shah (who you may remember from her Seinfood poster series.) The goal is to collect and catalog the made up words that we share with family and friends.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Feb 10, 2014 - 56 comments

Grumpy Disney: illustrations of Grumpy Cats as Disney Princesses

Eric Proctor, aka Tsaoshin, draws cute monsters, dragons, Disney characters and Grumpy Cats. The last two merge in a short series of images he calls Grumpy Disney, with the various Disney characters (mostly princesses) replaced with Grumpy Cats doing suitably Grumpy Cat things.
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 6, 2014 - 5 comments

MRS. P.J. GILLIGAN

How a 1908 Anti-Suffrage Cartoon Became an Internet Sensation (poster, tumblr) [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 4, 2014 - 72 comments

The illustrated farmer

The Great Maple Syrup Heist - in cartoon form!  ...and other illustrated stories by Lucas Adams in Modern Farmer, including The Legend of the Goat Man and The Pleasant Valley Sheep War. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Jan 16, 2014 - 23 comments

Born to paint

Interview with illustrator Philip Castle about producing the iconic film posters for Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket and Clockwork Orange [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 16, 2014 - 0 comments

Tatsuo Horiuchi: The David Byrne of Excel

Tatsuo Horiuchi came to art late in his life, and with an unusual tool. At age 60, he was inspired by graphs he saw, and started using Microsoft Excel to make art in the style of traditional Japanese scenes. See more on Spoon & Tamago and Bored Panda.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 30, 2013 - 16 comments

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