323 posts tagged with illustration and art.
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Water color and computer concept illustrations by Tucker Cullinan

Tucker Cullinan is a concept artist whose styles span vivid organic/sci-fi scenes in water colors and lost worlds from the imaginary past, to colder, sharp-edged futuristic worlds, and computer illustrations of imaginary prototypes. More on his blog and his portfolio site, plus two interviews.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2014 - 2 comments

xylem never looked so good

V Martineau Illustration: The Miracle of Trees, Sciencia Illustrations, Levels Of Complexity, Plants, The Paper Birch Tree, Why The Sky Is Far Away [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 27, 2014 - 4 comments

Beauty itself doth of itself persuade The eyes of men without an orator.

Folger Shakespeare Library Releases 80,000 Images for Creative Common Use. The Folger Shakespeare Library announced yesterday, that they have released the contents of their Digital Image Collection under a Creative Commons Share-Alike (CC-BY-SA) license. Full database can be accessed here.
posted by Fizz on Aug 13, 2014 - 18 comments

Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

"I draw with paper instead of on it"

Yulia Brodskaya is a Russian artist/illustrator now living in England whose quilled paper pieces are increasingly in demand. Her website is rich with her work - jump right into the illustration or art sectons - or browse the news section to see a roughly reverse chronological listing. Design Taxi has collected a group of images highlighting her quilled typography. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 4, 2014 - 7 comments

Also Monster Haikus

Childhood - a hand-bound book of Japanese styled illustrations paying homage to nostalgic activities and toys. From artist Chet Phillips.
posted by Lou Stuells on Jun 17, 2014 - 6 comments

"On a cloud I saw a child, and he laughing said to me…"

The book is considered the rarest of Sendak’s published work — so rare that it’s practically impossible for even art historians to get their eyes on a copy for scholarly work. To commemorate the 86th birthday of Maurice Sendak (previously), Maria Popova (previously) has published scans of illustrations Sendak did for an ultra-ultra-rare edition of William Blake's Songs of Innocence.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 10, 2014 - 13 comments

Pat Perry

Pat Perry's surreal sketchbook and surreal art [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jun 5, 2014 - 7 comments

J.C. Leyendecker

Before Rockwell, a Gay Artist Defined the Perfect American Male. [more inside]
posted by bibliogrrl on Jun 5, 2014 - 42 comments

SAN値さがるぞぉぉぉぉー!

Yamada Gouki (山田剛毅), aka goking, has been illustrating creatures from the Cthulhu Mythos and similar horrors in an ukiyo-e style: Cyaegha, Igolnaku, The Thing That Plays with Fate, Cthonian, Byakhee, and would like to wish you a very Merry Fishmas from Innsmouth. You can find more illustrations on his Twitter or his blog, 2D6. [more inside]
posted by 23 on May 29, 2014 - 11 comments

Protein Packing

Harvard University and XVIVO have come together again (Previouslyw/ a commercial focus, Previouslierw/an Academic focus) to add to the growing series of scientific animations for BioVisions -- Harvard's multimedia lab in the department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. 'Protein Packing' strives to more accurately depict the molecular chaos in each and every cell, with proteins jittering around in what may seem like random motion. Proteins occupy roughly 40% of the cytoplasm, creating an environment that risks unintentional interaction and aggregation. Via diffusion and motor protein transport, these molecules are directed to sites where they are needed.
Much of this is no doubt inspired by the beautiful art and explained illustrations of David Goodsell, a biologist at Scripps who has been accurately portraying the crowdedness of the cellular landscape for a long time now.
[more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Apr 10, 2014 - 9 comments

Rooms within rooms, endless cities and labyrinthine structures

"I hope that a viewer will be able to put themselves in my spaces. To that end I’ve avoided adding any figures of any kind to inhabit the rooms, so the viewer is free to imagine themselves inhabiting them if they choose. Some people find them claustrophobic, others want to linger. The detail draws in the viewer, though I’ve also seen it repel the odd person. I enjoy the combination of the creepy and the whimsical. Perhaps this boils down to wanting my drawings to be haunted in the same way that my dreams locales often feel haunted." Excerpt from an interview with Matthew Borrett, an artist/illustrator who draws black and white rooms, scenes from unreal worlds, and some more realistic settings.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 9, 2014 - 7 comments

"I guess I’m an artist. That’s my super power."

A short and sweet 10-minute documentary on musician and artist Daniel Johnston. [SLYT] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 6, 2014 - 14 comments

Lunchbox Doodles

"Q: What is the story behind Lunchbox Doodles and how long have you been doing it? A: It really started as a result of the fond memories I have of opening my lunch at school and reading notes my mother would place inside. While I can't remember specifically what they said, they had an impact on me. They served as a reminder that my parents were thinking of me even when I wasn't with them."
posted by ColdChef on Feb 26, 2014 - 9 comments

Grumpy Disney: illustrations of Grumpy Cats as Disney Princesses

Eric Proctor, aka Tsaoshin, draws cute monsters, dragons, Disney characters and Grumpy Cats. The last two merge in a short series of images he calls Grumpy Disney, with the various Disney characters (mostly princesses) replaced with Grumpy Cats doing suitably Grumpy Cat things.
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 6, 2014 - 5 comments

Tatsuo Horiuchi: The David Byrne of Excel

Tatsuo Horiuchi came to art late in his life, and with an unusual tool. At age 60, he was inspired by graphs he saw, and started using Microsoft Excel to make art in the style of traditional Japanese scenes. See more on Spoon & Tamago and Bored Panda.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 30, 2013 - 16 comments

They get progressively less human the further they are from the Sun

"I’ve always loved space and the planets. I’ve seen a few 'human planets' sets done by other artists and most of them are pretty literal in the human department. I wanted to try making something more androgynous and godlike." [more inside]
posted by Narrative Priorities on Dec 5, 2013 - 25 comments

Don't Force Symbolism

How to Look at Art. An illustration and post by Incidental Comics' Grant Snider. Previously.
posted by Apropos of Something on Oct 17, 2013 - 15 comments

The Real Monsters

Artist Toby Allen has created fantastic faces for monsters which many are all too familiar with: Anxiety, Avoidant Personality Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, Paranoia, Dissociative Identity Disorder, And Social Anxiety. [via]
posted by quin on Sep 20, 2013 - 18 comments

“Great art is horseshit, buy tacos.”

I am not really quite sure how to describe the website MELT except to warn you to prepare to be away for a very long time. (NSFW).
Incorporating works of artists (Be sure to scroll down) both surreal and illustration and sculpters and photographers and documentaries and mixtapes and so much more.
Probably the best way to get around is to just click on the various labels.
Happy Travels
posted by adamvasco on Sep 9, 2013 - 7 comments

"I was ... working on something else but last night I dreamt of R'lyeh"

The title of Allen Williams' website, "I Just Draw," undersells his works. These are no idle doodles, but rather, as Guillermo del Toro wrote: "Entire worlds flow from Allen Williams' pencil and brush. Creatures and characters more twisted and full of humanity than our imagination dares to conjure. He is an incredible draughtsman and a true original mind." You can see more of Williams' works on his blog. Click on the images to enlarge them. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 3, 2013 - 10 comments

Hi, there. I want to talk to you about ducts. The ones on your turtle.

ライナーノーツ (translation: "liner notes") is a short video clip that makes sense if you imagine a fan of Terry Gilliam was inspired by the animated scenes from Monty Python, but set them in the grim future of Brazil, with the added twist that the dark future is built in/around giant giraffes, turtles, whales, and bison. From the Japanese artist Yuta Ikehara, whose website and additional work is available here (Google auto-translation; via Dark Roasted Blend's post on contemporary Japanese 2D artists)
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 29, 2013 - 1 comment

Living With Monsters

BAKELANASLAND! "Two years ago I set out on a journey inside my head to document the local fauna there. These photographs are what I've come back with so far, thirty three life forms that comprise the core essence of a much larger family that keeps growing everyday." Illustrations by Juan Carlos Paz. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Aug 7, 2013 - 6 comments

Zdeněk Burian

727 illustrations by legendary paleoartist Zdeněk Burian.
posted by brundlefly on Jul 23, 2013 - 16 comments

Book designs by Ellen Raskin

Ellen Raskin (1928-1984) is best known as a writer, author of The Mysterious Disappearance of Leon (I mean Noel) and the Newbery Award-winning The Westing Game. But she always considered herself an artist first. Raskin designed over 1,000 book covers, including the iconic original cover of A Wrinkle In Time, the edition of Dubliners you probably read in college, and the New Directions edition of a Child's Christmas in Wales (Raskin did the woodcuts on the inside, too; further appreciation here.) More Raskin covers are collected in this flickr set from Bennington College. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Jul 18, 2013 - 29 comments

Soviet Futurism

Tekhnika Molodezhi was the Popular Mechanics of the Soviet Union. The magazine, whose name means Technology for the Youth, had illustrations of everything from space stations, computerized farming, transport of the future, friendly robots, to more abstract images. If you don't want to hunt through the archive, Mythbuster's Tested website has a gallery of 201 great images from the magazine.
posted by Kattullus on Jul 15, 2013 - 24 comments

I have never been a very sound sleeper...

The Moon is Rolling in Her Grave is a video adaptation of the first chapter of the ongoing (since 2003) comic series "No Rest For The Wicked" by Andrea L. Peterson, a fantasy / adventure / horror tale that takes traditional fairytales and turns them on their heads: "Ms. Peterson uses, in conjunction with several more popular fables, folktales that you may have never even heard of. The entire plot actually centers around a little known Grimm fairytale called 'The Buried Moon', while also making reference to 'Red Riding Hood', 'Hansel & Gretel', 'The Girl Without Hands', 'The Boy Who Went Forth and Learned What Fear Was', and many MANY others." [more inside]
posted by taz on Jul 7, 2013 - 3 comments

"an early 1960s self-portrait as a pitchman"

The Fine Art of Resilience: Lessons from Stanley Meltzoff [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 3, 2013 - 1 comment

Velocissimo, Affrettando, Prestissimo!!

50,000 years of Western music in under 500 seconds: A video of artist Pablo Morales de los Rios creating one of those whiteboard-n'-marker style accelerated drawings spanning ~500 centuries of the stuff that soothes a savage breast. (Spanish, with English subtitles. Warning: may not contain all the things.)
posted by taz on Jun 30, 2013 - 12 comments

It's like the entire world left Caps Lock on for 180 million years.

What Daleks, xenomorphs and slasher movies tell us about palaeoart. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Jun 17, 2013 - 9 comments

The Monster of Colors Doesn't Have a Mouth

"One day I dreamed that my parents, my brothers and I went to visit three islands and I jumped into the water without protection," she wrote in her diary. "I felt like I could be in the water and not drown. I was curious and I swam into the deep water and then I saw my skeleton with my name written on it." Roger Omar collects children's dreams, and asks artists to illustrate them. [more inside]
posted by taz on Jun 9, 2013 - 18 comments

Roger Ebert on Kindness: The Cartoon

'Kindness' covers all of my political beliefs. A new cartoon from Gavin Aung Than's Zen Pencils inspired by the late, great Roger Ebert. (Zen Pencils previously)
posted by NoMich on Jun 4, 2013 - 21 comments

a great collection of medieval illustration

Weird, funny, surreal, fun, silly, bawdy, macabre, cool and strangely beautiful. The Discarded Image is a Tumblr collection of Medieval illustrations gleaned from various illuminated manuscripts, bestiaries, books describing the cosmology of the Middle Ages, ordered and maintained by a celestial hierarchy. The Discarded Image is also the name of CS Lewis' last book, about the fascinating Medieval mindset and world picture. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 13, 2013 - 23 comments

Studio Rayyan

The art of Omar Rayyan "Rayyan’s artwork includes fantasy-inspired paintings of dragons, mythological creatures set against a backdrop of seemingly ordinary buildings and people, works of abstraction such as the teapot hat on a man drinking a cup of tea in “Mists of Oolong,” and all manner of woodland creatures as one might expect to find in an animated Disney film or a children’s book of fairy tales."
posted by dhruva on Apr 12, 2013 - 13 comments

British family Robinson: the short stories of three illustrators

Thomas Robinson and Eliza Heath had three sons, Thomas (1869-1950), Charles (1870-1937), and William (1872-1944), who followed in their father's (and grandfather's) footsteps as illustrators of various sorts. The most widely know was the youngest, W. Heath Robinson, whose contraptions earned him the reputation as the UK counterpart to the US artist Rube Goldberg. But the other two brothers are not to be overlooked. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 20, 2013 - 6 comments

I need a name that's cutting-edge, like CutCo, EdgeCom, InterSlice...

"At the time, Groening was best known as the artist of the comic Life in Hell, as The Simpsons has not yet premiered. The brochure was titled, 'Who Needs a Computer Anyway' and interspersed Groening’s Life in Hell style illustrations with standard information on Apple’s Mac computers." Apple once hired Matt Groening to do some illustrations for them.
posted by gauche on Mar 4, 2013 - 36 comments

Pokémon From Memory

Laura Bifano (previously) has not seen a Pokémon since she was 12, but she's going to draw them anyway. Sometimes she has help from her followers, who describe the characters they want her to draw. Noelle Stevenson (previously) did a similar project last year.
posted by capricorn on Mar 2, 2013 - 12 comments

To caricature and simplify at the same time!

Charley Harper's "minimal realism" contributions to science and art are being celebrated by the graphic design blog Codex 99. Part 1 - Charley and Edie. Part 2 - The Birds. Part 3 - Tin Lizzie and Dinner for Two. Part 4 - The Golden Book of Biology. Part 5 - Bambi and Childcraft. Part 6 - The Animal Kingdom.
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 30, 2013 - 10 comments

See Monkeys

Thousands of illustrations and photographs for all your primate picture needs. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 18, 2013 - 2 comments

THE BOSOM BUDDIES OF WASTE

“During the 1920s, the British firm Parker-Holladay created a fictional character named Bill Jones. Mr. Jones’ dispensed his friendly advice to British clerical workers through colorful lithographic posters emblazoned with his get-right-to-the-point maxims." Why not enjoy this collection of can-do, yes-sir business motivational posters before you head back to work?
posted by The Whelk on Jan 1, 2013 - 40 comments

Jeff Victor Redux

The Evolution Series, by artist and animator Jeff Victor. (Previously) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 14, 2012 - 3 comments

Girls: Fact or Fiction

Girls: Fact + Fiction Gallery (some images MNSFW)
posted by ColdChef on Dec 11, 2012 - 29 comments

Jeffrey Beebe's Refractoria

Over the last fifteen years, I have created the world of Refractoria, a comprehensive imagino-ordinary world that is equal parts autobiography and pure fantasy. - Jeffrey Beebe [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Nov 27, 2012 - 11 comments

The Mico / Тхе Мичо

Mihajlo Dimitrovski (The Mico / Тхе Мичо on deviantArt, Facebook, Blogspot) is an artist most famous for his fanart, and he's got some great A Song Of Ice And Fire illustrations (and others!). [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 15, 2012 - 5 comments

Farmer's Dilemma

"Farmer's Dilemma" is a short, sad and beautiful comic about family and acceptance. From Sam Alden's art blog, GINGERLAND.
posted by teraflop on Nov 14, 2012 - 13 comments

"Unbelievable. Do you recognize those uniforms?"

Artist Dusty Abell has created a massive poster featuring "at least one, sometimes more, character, entity, starship or structure from every episode of [Star Trek: The Original] series." Via io9, who ask: How many characters can you name? Stumped? Here's a key of all 123! [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 21, 2012 - 25 comments

Fevk-ül Adâlet

Berk Senturk presents "Ottoman was Geeky", a collection of reinterpreted pop culture characters.
posted by griphus on Oct 13, 2012 - 8 comments

Damn, I wish I thought of that.

The Jealous Curator is 'a collection of art that inspires & depresses' its proprietor, who has been updating the site almost daily since February 2009 with series of paintings, sculpture and mixed media, furniture, and always with light-hearted commentary about what's posted.
posted by shakespeherian on Oct 10, 2012 - 8 comments

A gallery of litigations that could have been

Imagine you're a game producer in the late 1980s, a week before the deadline and you still haven't got a cover for your game. Exhausted from crunchtime, you tell your illustrator to just rip off some Schwarzenegger action movie to get the job done. Careful, your subordinate might take the order all too literally!
Hardcore Gaming 101 present Tracing the Influence - Stolen Images in Games: Schwarzenegger and Stallone, Illustrators and Painters, Other Boxart and Ads, Ingame Graphics pt. I, Ingame Graphics pt. II.
posted by griphus on Oct 10, 2012 - 24 comments

The other E. H. Shepard

Though virtually synonymous with his images for Winnie-the-Pooh and The Wind in the Willows, Ernest Howard Shepard (1879-1976) was one of the most consistent and wide-ranging illustrators of the twentieth century.
posted by curious nu on Oct 5, 2012 - 6 comments

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