18 posts tagged with illustration and artists.
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Illustrators to Character Designers

Artists Peter de Seve and Carter Goodrich share similar career arcs. Both began their illustration careers in early 80's New York, drawing many businessmen and computers for trade magazines. Both became New Yorker cover artists. As the print market became challenged, both artists found new demand for the talents in emerging media, creating the look of the characters in animated films. Goodrich worked on Ratatouille, Despicable Me, and Brave. De Seve is responsible for all the characters in the Ice Age films. [more inside]
posted by TimTypeZed on May 10, 2013 - 1 comment

The World of C86

The World of C86 showcases the bright, abstracted artwork of Matt Lyon. [more inside]
posted by Mizu on Sep 25, 2012 - 12 comments

Children's book art by Freud's niece Tom

The Rabbit Dreams of Dr. Freud's Niece - An illustrator of children's books, Sigmund Freud's niece Martha went by the name Tom, wore men's clothing, and died by her own hand in her late 30s, a year after her husband's suicide. BibliOdyssey recently featured some of her early work from Das Baby-Liederbuch, noting that because she was Jewish, many of her books were destroyed in the Nazi era and are scarce in the book trade. More about the artist and her work at Tom Seidmann-Freud.
posted by madamjujujive on Dec 18, 2011 - 14 comments

Lost in the information

John Jerome O'Connor produces infographics of a different sort. Subjects include; obesity and binge drinking by US state; cultural differences regarding personal space; the lottery; earthquakes and wars; offensive words on TV; differences between predicted and actual temperatures; and itches. (via) [more inside]
posted by mrgrimm on Feb 25, 2011 - 14 comments

[Warning—painted Victorian bosom below]

On Tor.com, Mefi'sown Patrick Garcon (smoke) is writing lively essays on Victorian fantasy illustration, from the Pre-Raphaelites to Orientalism. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Sep 3, 2010 - 12 comments

picturing childhood

FairyTaleFilter: SurLaLune Fairy Tales features 49 annotated fairy tales, including their histories, similar tales across cultures, modern interpretations and over 1,500 illustrations, 1,600 folktales & fairy tales from around the world in more than 40 full-text eBooks. Fairy Tale timeline. l Women Children's Book Illustrators l The Evolution of the Illustrated Children's Book l Some really beautiful free graphics and clipart from Grandma's Graphics. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Oct 1, 2008 - 11 comments

Do Your Strip Comic Exhibit

Do Your Strip: A hopeful book and exhibition where 70 artists and illustrators invent a character, provide instructions on how to draw it, then create the first comic adventure. Exhibit-goers would then create additional stories with their favorite characters. All the characters, instructions, and first strips can be seen here [pdf]. [more inside]
posted by artifarce on Jun 4, 2008 - 5 comments

Victorian wood-engraved illustrations

The Database of Mid-Victorian Wood-engraved Illustration (Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, Cardiff University) hosts well over eight hundred images from Victorian texts; you can browse the site by iconographic themes and features (tools, religion, etc.) or conduct more specific searches by author, publisher, and the like. For more overviews of Victorian book illustration, visit Bob Speel's nineteenth-century art website, which features a number of pages devoted to various topics in book illustration, and the Victorian Web. Illuminated Books features a small collection of digitized illustrated works, many of them Victorian; there's a larger collection at Children's Books Online. The Victorian novelist we most closely associate with book illustration is Charles Dickens, and David Perdue has brief biographical sketches of his various illustrators, with examples of their work. Famous illustrators with their own websites include Sir John Tenniel, Arthur Rackham, and Randolph Caldecott. (Main link via VICTORIA.)
posted by thomas j wise on Jun 29, 2007 - 14 comments

Coconino World - treasure trove of graphics & cartooning

Get lost in the fabulous labyrinth of Coconino World, a mammoth French site with thousands of images from illustrators, graphic artists, and cartoonists ranging from the classics to the contemporary. Some personal favorites: the generous selection of graphics from Simplicissimus, the celebrated German satire magazine published weekly from 1896-1944. James Swinerton's Canyon Kiddies. George Herriman's Krazy Kat. -more-
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 15, 2007 - 9 comments

On your mark ... get set ... drawer

Drawer Geeks is an illustration challenge founded by Greg Hardin. Alternate Fridays, a group of 25+ professional animators, illustrators, cartoonists, and designers riff on a given fictional character. This past week's theme was Santa Claus. Among archived themes, I particularly liked: Medusa and The Grim Reaper. (via diminished Responsibility)
posted by madamjujujive on Dec 17, 2006 - 34 comments

Urban Forest Project

Design Times Square: The Urban Forest Project "brings 185 banners created by the world’s most celebrated designers, artists, photographers and illustrators to New York’s Times Square. Each banner uses the form of the tree, or a metaphor for the tree, to make a powerful visual statement. Together they create a forest of thought-provoking images at one of the world’s busiest, most energetic, and emphatically urban intersections." Including work by Milton Glaser, the Walker Art Center, and many, many others. Via Speak Up.
posted by tpl1212 on Aug 29, 2006 - 9 comments

witty portraits

Pablo Lobato is an Argentinian graphic artist who uses color and geometric shape to create witty portraits and caricatures. More works are available at his website (sound & flash alert). His site's select links to other caricaturists are great, including David Cowles who he names as an influence and the brilliant Hannoch Piven.
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 22, 2006 - 15 comments

Illustrations by Ben Tolman

Ink drawings by Ben Tolman: Huge, intricate, somewhat NSFW. There may be an issue with the side frame not scrolling in Firefox; if this is the case, click here, here, here, and here to see the galleries.
posted by Gator on Jul 8, 2006 - 16 comments

Enough With The Pickles Already, Chewbacca

Andrey Kuznetsov makes delightful lubki (sing. lubok), a form of Russian folk art, out of some well-known modern movies. Some information (in English) about the medium and its origins with many examples can be seen here (warning: Java). Shamelessly ganked from AskMe. Thanks jonson!
posted by Gator on Jul 5, 2006 - 15 comments

Reilly Stroope

Illustrations by Reilly Stroope. (Flash interface.)
posted by Gator on Mar 26, 2006 - 11 comments

Baby Art

Not safe for work: Baby Art: the profoundly fucked-up artwork of one Trevor Brown, a fabulously unwell individual.
posted by Gator on Mar 2, 2006 - 54 comments

Double Fine Action Comics

Double Fine Action Comics. My favourite adventures, from their beginning episodes: Art Director Scott Campbell's 2HB & friends, and Nathan Stapley's My Comic About Me. Prepare thine LOLerskates for some fun terrain! p.s. your favourite webcomic sucks.
posted by elphTeq on Mar 1, 2006 - 7 comments

The Center For Cartoon Studies

The Center for Cartoon Studies, nestled in the historic village of White River Junction, Vermont, will learn you up good on how to be a comic artist/graphic novelist. They operate under the charter of the National Association of Comics Art Educators; Charles Schulz's widow Jean hooked them up with funding for a library in town. When you apply for admission, don't forget to include that story about you, the snowman, and the robot. A photo tour of the Center and its surroundings can be seen here.
posted by Gator on Feb 13, 2006 - 10 comments

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