613 posts tagged with illustration.
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Scifi magazine covers, 1930-today

A year-by-year archive, from 1930 to the present, of every poignant, creepy, tacky, tragic, goofy, beautiful and, yes, kinda slutty cover of the magazine that started out as Astounding Stories of Super Science and became Analog, with lots of changes in between. [via the horse's neck]
posted by mediareport on Nov 11, 2006 - 35 comments

Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie

Confessions of a Bookplate Junkie [via]
posted by mediareport on Nov 6, 2006 - 16 comments

50s and 60s Children's Record Covers

50s and 60s Album Covers. Archive volunteer and resident video guru, Eric Graf has amassed an amazing collection of novelty and children's records from the 50s and 60s. He brought a stack by the other day to be scanned. Check out how these covers make you want to rush to your phonograph to play the record. [via Bedazzled]
posted by soundofsuburbia on Nov 3, 2006 - 7 comments

French Mapping etc

The Mapmaker's Wife tells the extraordinary story of Isabel Godin, the first woman to travel down the length of the Amazon. Her journey brought an end to the first scientific expedition to the New World, which was led by Charles Marie de La Condamine.
posted by dhruva on Nov 2, 2006 - 12 comments

Gorgeous Art Deco blog

Art Deco blog From Lisbon, gatochy celebrates the Jazz Age (and Art Nouveau on Wednesdays). See also Beautiful Century and her flickr sets, which are full of fun.
posted by mediareport on Oct 26, 2006 - 10 comments

What are those mefi artsy types up to now?

First, interrobang got the ball rolling with his cool illustrations that can be shuffled in any order to create a new continuous panorama. Cortex added some coded widgetry to automate the process, creating a neat little toy. Then taz and iconomy joined in with their own creative spin. It's nice to see a contemporary techno version of the polyrama, a fine creative tradition dating back to the mid 1800s.
posted by madamjujujive on Oct 17, 2006 - 39 comments

Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge 2006

Scientific visualization challenge 2006: This year's winners captured inner details of a child mummy, mathematical surfaces rendered as glass objects, the highest mountain on Earth, air traffic by night, etc...
posted by dhruva on Oct 4, 2006 - 10 comments

The Daily Collage Project from Portugal

Candy. Bureaucracy. Memory. The Daily Collage Project, from Dilar Pereira in Portugal. [via]
posted by mediareport on Oct 4, 2006 - 6 comments

Beautiful old German zoological wall charts

Beautiful, occasionally abstract, old German zoological wall charts. [via]
posted by mediareport on Oct 3, 2006 - 17 comments

Carnets de voyage

Carnets de voyage : illustrated notebooks of travel (french site)
posted by dhruva on Oct 2, 2006 - 8 comments

Emblem Books

Alciato's (or Alciati's) Book of Emblems, first published in 1531, began the craze for emblem books. You can see the international scope of the emblem book's popularity by visiting the Emblem Project Utrecht (Dutch love emblems), the English Emblem Books Project, Glasgow University Press Emblem Website (French emblem books), the Bavarian State Library Project (international collection; German-language site), German Emblem Books, and Literatura Emblemática Hispánica (Spanish; utterly bonkers search engine). Bryn Mawr and the University of Iowa have online exhibitions from their collections. See also this scholarly exploration of the emblem book's influence on William Blake. (A different work by Alciati was discussed in this thread.)
posted by thomas j wise on Sep 10, 2006 - 7 comments

I’ve probably got around 30,000 of them filed away now…

During his downtime on early worldwide tours with DEVO, Mark Mothersbaugh began illustrating on postcards to send to his friends, which he still creates, and has been creating every day for over 30 years. It's an obsessive habit/hobby which still yields anywhere from one to a couple dozen new postcard-sized images per day.
posted by furtive on Sep 3, 2006 - 11 comments

Urban Forest Project

Design Times Square: The Urban Forest Project "brings 185 banners created by the world’s most celebrated designers, artists, photographers and illustrators to New York’s Times Square. Each banner uses the form of the tree, or a metaphor for the tree, to make a powerful visual statement. Together they create a forest of thought-provoking images at one of the world’s busiest, most energetic, and emphatically urban intersections." Including work by Milton Glaser, the Walker Art Center, and many, many others. Via Speak Up.
posted by tpl1212 on Aug 29, 2006 - 9 comments

witty portraits

Pablo Lobato is an Argentinian graphic artist who uses color and geometric shape to create witty portraits and caricatures. More works are available at his website (sound & flash alert). His site's select links to other caricaturists are great, including David Cowles who he names as an influence and the brilliant Hannoch Piven.
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 22, 2006 - 15 comments

Illustrator Marcos Chin

If you ride a subway in North America, you've probably seen the pictures: standing before that always red background, stylish urbanites look over their shoulders, giving each other flirtatious looks. And even if you're not in the dating market, you may have taken interest in the posters' energetic style, in the way their intricate linework confidently mixes caricature and fashion illustration influences, and wondered what the artist gets up to when he's not tempting singles towards Lavalife. The artist is Marcos Chin.
posted by TimTypeZed on Aug 17, 2006 - 38 comments

Moomins Galore

Moomins! The Moomins, created in 1945 by artist and writer Tove Jansson in this story, went on to become a series of books beloved by children in the 60s and 70s and then a British TV show in the early 80s. The Moomins’ fame is so all pervading in Finland that they have their own amusement park and museum but they somehow have never gained as much of a foothold in the US. Why are the Moomins so popular? Some of the books are surprisingly philosophical and even dark and some of the characters are downright seditious; the Moomins, for all their humor and love, are often a little bleak. Tove Jansson, who modeled many of her characters on people in her life, was as talented an artist as she was a writer; here, for your delectation, are her illustrations for The Hobbit. Previously on Metafilter.
posted by mygothlaundry on Aug 13, 2006 - 36 comments

Arthur Rackham

Arthur Rackham Illustrations.
posted by sciurus on Aug 8, 2006 - 16 comments

The Toymaker: "Make toys! Play more!"

The Toymaker offers over 40 free paper toys and pretties you can print out (PDFs) and make yourself, as well as "Stories to be Told by Firelight" - online versions of author/illustrator Marilyn Scott Waters' children's stories and lots of other fun goodies. For people who have kids, people who know kids, people who are kids, and people who love papercraft, illustration, toys, and tales. [more...]
posted by taz on Jul 24, 2006 - 18 comments

Index of Medieval Medical Images

Index of Medieval Medical Images Searchable collection of medieval illustrations (to the year 1500); the thumbnails can be viewed at varying magnifications. There are many more interesting online repositories devoted to the history of medical illustration--both medieval and early modern--including Historical Anatomies on the Web, Anatomia, Seeing is Believing, and Medieval Manuscripts in the National Library of Medicine.
posted by thomas j wise on Jul 23, 2006 - 12 comments

The Feather Book

The Feather Book, digitized by and on display at McGill University: A seventeenth-century book containing illustrations of birds and men -- composed of real feathers, beaks, and claws. More information about the book and its contents and history can be read here.
posted by Gator on Jul 20, 2006 - 14 comments

Seeing is believing

Seeing is believing : Illustrations were essential in spreading new scientific and medical ideas and it was often the case that new developments in the sciences were accompanied by corresponding developments in illustrative techniques.
posted by dhruva on Jul 13, 2006 - 5 comments

Antique Celestial Maps

The U.S. Naval Observatory Library features high-res scans of images from antique books dealing with astronomy and navigation. Wallpapers, ahoy!
posted by Gator on Jul 13, 2006 - 18 comments

Illustrations by Ben Tolman

Ink drawings by Ben Tolman: Huge, intricate, somewhat NSFW. There may be an issue with the side frame not scrolling in Firefox; if this is the case, click here, here, here, and here to see the galleries.
posted by Gator on Jul 8, 2006 - 16 comments

Enough With The Pickles Already, Chewbacca

Andrey Kuznetsov makes delightful lubki (sing. lubok), a form of Russian folk art, out of some well-known modern movies. Some information (in English) about the medium and its origins with many examples can be seen here (warning: Java). Shamelessly ganked from AskMe. Thanks jonson!
posted by Gator on Jul 5, 2006 - 15 comments

The Outlandish Art of Mahlon Blaine

The Outlandish Art of Mahlon Blaine. The highlight for me was Nova Venus.
A short biography of Blaine.
Another smaller gallery, which includes illustrations he did for translations of the works of Hanns Heinz Ewers.
[Many/most images on all pages NSFW]
posted by PinkStainlessTail on Jul 5, 2006 - 7 comments

Happy Birthday, Rockwell Kent

Printmaker. Painter. Adventurer. Advertiser. One of the most popular graphic artists of the 20th century, he created the Random House logo for his pals Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer and illustrated their first book. His illustrations for another, Moby Dick, are widely credited with resurrecting that novel for modern audiences. His own first book was favorably compared to Whitman's Leaves of Grass and for a time his bookplates were everywhere, but he "virtually vanished from the museum and gallery circuits by the late 1940s" due to his outspoken support for Stalinism. When the State Department refused to grant him a passport because of his political views, he took his case to the Supreme Court and won, establishing that the right to travel cannot be denied to American citizens. Happy birthday, Rockwell Kent.
posted by mediareport on Jun 21, 2006 - 16 comments

We get too soon old and too late smart.

Welcome to the world of Frank Kelly Freas (1922-2005), eleven-time Hugo Award-winning illustrator of book and magazine cover and interior art for science fiction, fantasy, the NASA space program, record albums, advertising, and MAD Magazine.
posted by joe lisboa on May 19, 2006 - 8 comments

Martians, robots & flying cities

FRANK R. PAUL: At a time when most Americans didn't even have a telephone, he was painting space stations, robots and aliens from other planets... he was the guest of honor at the first world science fiction convention, and he was the first person to ever make a living drawing spaceships. What could be cooler than that? via the one and only BLDBLOG, with an interesting take on the subject.
posted by signal on May 17, 2006 - 19 comments

Very detailed illustrations of Brazilian flora

Flora Brasiliensis [flash needed] was published between 1840 and 1906. It contains taxonomic treatments of 22,767 species of Brazilian flora. The beauty of the illustrations and the level of detail you can magnify to is magnificent (sorry, direct linking to example images is not possible but trust me, go and have a look).
posted by tellurian on May 3, 2006 - 9 comments

Rock & roll artist

Laura Levine's works are themed around music, from her classic rock photos to her funky illustrations. Her children’s illustrated books about musical pioneers are delightful: Honky-Tonk Heroes & Hillbilly Angels is due out in May. Previously: Shake, Rattle & Roll and a collaboration with the B-52's, Wig! She also runs a curiosity shop in Phoenicia, NY. (via Internet Weekly)
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 11, 2006 - 2 comments

Reilly Stroope

Illustrations by Reilly Stroope. (Flash interface.)
posted by Gator on Mar 26, 2006 - 11 comments

Tom Judd's Everyday

Tom Judd's Everyday - "365 PAGES AGO I HAD A VERY SILLY IDEA. Draw a page everyday for one year. Each day I spent around 1 hour on the page, sometimes more, sometimes less. There was never any planning or preparation, I would just go at it whenever I had a spare moment in my day and had something I needed to write or draw. Some of the drawings are observational and some are just plain weird. Monsters and things seem to crop up a lot (robots too)."

Also of note...in 2006, Tom Judd is undertaking a "Once A Week: Art vs Advertising" project...
posted by tpl1212 on Mar 21, 2006 - 19 comments

Before Little Nemo, there were the Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend

I feel so bad since I ate that rarebit!
posted by Astro Zombie on Mar 7, 2006 - 36 comments

illustrated journeys

Kathrin2305's Moleskine slideshow The non-flash version. (via robot wisdom) -more-
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 5, 2006 - 22 comments

Baby Art

Not safe for work: Baby Art: the profoundly fucked-up artwork of one Trevor Brown, a fabulously unwell individual.
posted by Gator on Mar 2, 2006 - 54 comments

Double Fine Action Comics

Double Fine Action Comics. My favourite adventures, from their beginning episodes: Art Director Scott Campbell's 2HB & friends, and Nathan Stapley's My Comic About Me. Prepare thine LOLerskates for some fun terrain! p.s. your favourite webcomic sucks.
posted by elphTeq on Mar 1, 2006 - 7 comments

Jack Hamm Religious Cartoons

Jack Hamm Religious Cartoons. Hamm's art instruction books, including Cartooning the Head and Figure, have been widely influential among a generation of illustrators, Simpson's creator Matt Groening among them. Hamm began his cartooning career in the late 1930s and founded "The Jack Hamm Show," one of the first television art programs, which aired in the Dallas, Houston and Waco, Texas, TV markets.
posted by Otis on Feb 21, 2006 - 17 comments

Himmapan Creatures: Beasts of Asian Legend

Himmapan.com features illustrations and photos of artistic depictions of the creatures of the legendary Himmapan (or Himapan/Himaphan) Forest of the Himalayas. Fantastic chimeras of Asian mythology.
posted by Gator on Feb 16, 2006 - 7 comments

The Center For Cartoon Studies

The Center for Cartoon Studies, nestled in the historic village of White River Junction, Vermont, will learn you up good on how to be a comic artist/graphic novelist. They operate under the charter of the National Association of Comics Art Educators; Charles Schulz's widow Jean hooked them up with funding for a library in town. When you apply for admission, don't forget to include that story about you, the snowman, and the robot. A photo tour of the Center and its surroundings can be seen here.
posted by Gator on Feb 13, 2006 - 10 comments

a cat, a fish, a piano

Riba - a gorgeous animation with great 3-D effects - very charming! (6 min. QT clip) (via robot wisdom)
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 10, 2006 - 18 comments

Human camera

The Tokyo skyline [Windows or Real media] drawn from memory by savant Stephen Wiltshire.
posted by tellurian on Feb 5, 2006 - 38 comments

Ben Frost Artwork

Ben Frost is a painter, performance artist and illustrator who currently lives in Australia. His work explores themes of alienation, dispossession, and perversity that exists behind the facade of contemporary western society. By subverting mainstream iconography from the advertising, entertainment and political spectrum he creates a visual and conceptual framework that is bold, confronting and often contraversial.
posted by ColdChef on Feb 5, 2006 - 13 comments

Here I Dreamt I Was an Illustrator

The Art of Chris Turnham. Vivid, highly-stylized illustrations. The first four 2D images are part of a series that depict scenes from Decemberists songs.
posted by ludwig_van on Jan 16, 2006 - 7 comments

19th century medical caricatures

A nice collection of 19th century French and English medical caricatures, including some drawn by George Cruikshank.
posted by iconomy on Dec 29, 2005 - 8 comments

Freaky Deaky!

Shadowmechanics - Appropriately apocalyptic scenes for these end times. Artwork/Illustration by Harry Halme. A definite preponderance of nightmarish creatures and reapers to suit the mood of the last few day's political landscape. I found this at SpartanDog.
posted by spicynuts on Dec 21, 2005 - 17 comments

Alvin Lustig

The Alvin Lustig Archive - "Alvin Lustig's contributions to the design of books and book jackets, magazines, interiors, and textiles as well as his teachings would have made him a credible candidate for the AIGA Lifetime Achievement award when he was alive...Lustig created monuments of ingenuity and objects of aesthetic pleasure." The archive collects over 400 examples of his book, architectural, and ad-design work (see also AIGA's list of Lustig's Top-10 designs). Via HOW magazine...
posted by tpl1212 on Dec 20, 2005 - 5 comments

The Art Of War

At least one commander told him, "Follow the soldiers' instructions, because they'll put their lives at risk to save you." But no one tried to censor his drawings or discourage him from going out on missions. -- Steve Mumford is a New York painter who was embedded as a "combat artist" in Iraq. The archives of his Baghdad Journal make for fascinating reading. He has recently published a large book of the art he created on this voyage.
posted by Gator on Dec 18, 2005 - 9 comments

Everyone’s favorite conservative talk show host does battle with a 3-headed liberal monster!

A must for Rush fans everywhere, and those who enjoyed Reagan's Raiders and Liberality.
posted by you just lost the game on Dec 1, 2005 - 39 comments

The Art of Chris Appelhans

Froghat Studios The illustration, animation, and design of Chris Appelhans. Don't miss his comic, Frank and Frank, or the Superman animated short.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Nov 29, 2005 - 10 comments

Lived Locally, Inspired Globally..

Yet another part of childhood gone. Stan Berenstain passed away today. [MI]
posted by bluedaniel on Nov 28, 2005 - 66 comments

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