589 posts tagged with illustration.
Displaying 201 through 250 of 589. Subscribe:

Chris Ware Interview

An interview with Chris Ware from May 2010 at the international Copenhagen comics festival. Ware is the creator of Acme Novelty Library and Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. (via kottke) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4
posted by BitterOldPunk on Mar 22, 2011 - 9 comments

Muppet Museum of Natural History

Bill Mudron's Color Cornucopia
posted by OverlappingElvis on Mar 18, 2011 - 7 comments

Leg Godt!

Jim Hughes loves illustration and graphic design, as witness his gorgeous and eclectic blog Codex xcix. He also loves Lego, as you can tell from his delightfully detailed Brick Fetish site. His newest blog post combines these two loves into Lego: A Natural History of Package Design. [more inside]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Mar 10, 2011 - 7 comments

Sick Ink

Tokyo artist Sagaki Keita creates incredibly detailed illustrations which are almost completely improvised. More of his work can be found on his website.
posted by gman on Mar 10, 2011 - 18 comments

That Other Kind of Panelling

Powerful Panels. Kirby Panels. 50 Monday Panels. Art of Archie Panels. Panels Repaneled. [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Mar 2, 2011 - 9 comments

From Blacksburg to Libya

Virginia Tech geography Professor John Boyer has already enjoyed local notoriety for his comic book styled super hero alter-ego The Plaid Avenger. His 2006 text book raised controversy for including cocktail recipes along with a bombastic writing style and caricatures of world leaders illustrated by Klaus Shmidheiser, an alumi. This week their collaborative effort received the ultimate compliment— Libyan protestors have used Klaus' image of Gadhafi in signs and effigies. Here's a video interview.
posted by fontophilic on Feb 25, 2011 - 9 comments

Lost in the information

John Jerome O'Connor produces infographics of a different sort. Subjects include; obesity and binge drinking by US state; cultural differences regarding personal space; the lottery; earthquakes and wars; offensive words on TV; differences between predicted and actual temperatures; and itches. (via) [more inside]
posted by mrgrimm on Feb 25, 2011 - 14 comments

16: A garden anchored by an ancient avocado

Gaku Nakagawa was born in the temple Zuisenji, Kyoto in 1966. He studied Buddhist art at university and worked as a copywriter after graduation. He is also a monk of the Jyodousyu sect. Since 1996 he has worked as an illustrator, producing images that are described as informal yet truly sophisticated, if similar to some 1950's illustration. His work appears in Monocle's animated 50 Things to Improve the Way You Live (Flash interface), at the Welsh Assembly website: Your Assembly (6mb pdf), and elsewhere like the outside of Heartwood Cafe. He also illustrated a children's book, Ice Cream Once a Year. You can get some of his illustrations in a zip file.
posted by cashman on Feb 11, 2011 - 10 comments

"Find yourself surrounded by the things that support you".

Experience the art of Jerry Pinkney [Artists webpage], a master of the American picturebook whose unforgettable visual narratives reflect deeply felt personal and cultural themes, bearing witness to the African-American experience, the wonders of classic literature, and the wisdom in well-loved folk tales. A belief in the ability of images to speak about and to humanity is at this legendary artist’s core. His artworks celebrating life’s small but extraordinary moments and significant historical events reflect the power of visual storytelling in our lives, “becoming the voice that others may not have had.” His commissioned work, and illustrations are an incredible body of work, but also don't miss his independent creations either. [more inside]
posted by infinite intimation on Feb 6, 2011 - 2 comments

Remember to include the sentence "I blue myself."

Tired of waiting for that Arrested Development movie? Make your own with these Arrested Development paper dolls (courtesy of Kyle Hilton).
posted by Katemonkey on Feb 5, 2011 - 34 comments

What does J.G. Ballard look like? - by Rick Poynor

An examination of the cover design for the published works of J.G. Ballard, spanning five decades. [more inside]
posted by dvorak_beats_qwerty on Feb 4, 2011 - 10 comments

Simply Incredible

Stephen Biesty is an award-winning British illustrator famous for his bestselling "Incredible" series of engineering art books: Incredible Cross-Sections, Incredible Explosions, Incredible Body, and many more. A master draftsman, Biesty does not use computers or even rulers in composing his intricate and imaginative drawings, relying on nothing more than pen and ink, watercolor, and a steady hand. Over the years, he's adapted his work to many other mediums, including pop-up books, educational games (video), interactive history sites, and animation. You can view much of his work in the zoomable galleries on his professional page, or click inside for a full listing of direct links to high-resolution, desktop-quality copies from his and other sites, including several with written commentary from collaborator Richard Platt [site, .mp3 chat]. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 4, 2011 - 24 comments

Iconographie ouvrages anciens

Iconographie ouvrages anciens is a collection of historic animal illustrations that date as far back as the 16th Century, courtesy of the library at Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Lyon. [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jan 26, 2011 - 10 comments

Hallucination master Ivan Bilibin

Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin had an eye for bold lines, vivid colors and hypnotic patterns but he also comfortable working in shades of gray, and he wasn't above making a buck. His early work illustrating fairy tales led naturally to his later engagement in the theater as a costume and set designer. [more inside]
posted by Rat Spatula on Jan 22, 2011 - 18 comments

Crash covers

A collection of covers from different editions of Crash. Includes some commentary by JG Ballard.
posted by Dim Siawns on Jan 19, 2011 - 26 comments

But it's great exposure!

Are you a designer? Artist? Musician? Web designer? Writer? Freelancer whatever? Then you need to know: Should I Work For Free?
posted by The Whelk on Jan 12, 2011 - 37 comments

Playing card art

♡♢♣ Different kinds of playing card art. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Jan 11, 2011 - 20 comments

Creatures born from goo.

If you were trying to decide which online cartoon creation myth you wanted to read today, Nick Edwards's First and Last Project should do the trick. (via) [more inside]
posted by shakespeherian on Jan 11, 2011 - 2 comments

Nothing is Forgotten

Nothing is Forgotten, a lovely little wordless comic about loss, fear, kindness, and memory.
posted by Gator on Jan 4, 2011 - 39 comments

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity

The Bermuda Triangle of Productivity
posted by Tuesday After Lunch on Dec 31, 2010 - 39 comments

Animalarium

Animalarium is full of wonderful images and videos, contemporary and vintage, The Insects' Christmas is especially charming. Animals as an endless source of creative inspiration. An exploration of the finest in art, illustration, crafts and design from around the world featuring animals, both real and fantastic [slightly nsfw].
posted by nickyskye on Dec 26, 2010 - 2 comments

Dungeons & Drawings

"Dungeons and Drawings," in which two artists reinterpret the D&D Bestiary.
posted by brundlefly on Dec 21, 2010 - 27 comments

The cutaway drawing and its artists

The cutaway drawing and its artists. Enjoy. [more inside]
posted by clorox on Dec 3, 2010 - 15 comments

Fashion From Old People

Artists Vera Brosgol (previously) and Emily Carroll (also previously) have made a project out "Interpreting photos of outfits into drawings of outfits." [more inside]
posted by Narrative Priorities on Nov 30, 2010 - 12 comments

Heroes, Rogues, and Jezebels

Pulp Fiction is an exhibition of (mostly) Australian pulp novel and magazine covers from the University of Otago Special Collections Library. (NSFW)
posted by Horace Rumpole on Nov 23, 2010 - 15 comments

The Cthulhu Mythos, as drawn by children

David Milano, who ran an art project for a children's choir in the weeks before Halloween, exposes kids to the world of Lovecraft. We've seen students in higher education do this, why not elementary school kids?
posted by Apocryphon on Nov 17, 2010 - 26 comments

HP Lovecraft Creature Lab

In September, Jon Schindehette [previously] and Lars Grant-West [wiki] issued a challenge to students at the Rhode Island School of Design: "Create a creature based upon a non-humanoid critter from H.P. Lovecraft's literature. The creature should have a fully resolved form, convey motion where appropriate, and be believable. Creature can be shown as either 3/4 view or 'turn-arounds'." Here are the entries and here are the judges' comments. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Nov 8, 2010 - 58 comments

Scary Sketches to Glimpse in the Dark

Nearly three decades ago, folklorist Alvin Schwartz published Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, the first of three horror anthologies that would go on to become the single most challenged book series of the 1990s. But most of the backlash was against not the stories themselves (which were fairly tame), but rather the illustrations of artist Stephen Gammell. His bizarre, grotesque, nightmarish black-and-white inkscapes suffused every page with an eerie, unsettling menace. Sadly, the series has since been re-issued with new illustrations by Brett Helquist, of A Series of Unfortunate Events fame. Luckily for fans of Gammell's dark vision, copies of the old artwork abound online, including in these three image galleries: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, More Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones. Interested in revisiting the stories themselves? Then don't miss the virtual re-enactments of YouTube user MoonRaven09, or the dramatic readings of fellow YouTuber daMeatHook.
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 29, 2010 - 48 comments

A MONSTER'S LIFE IS NEVER BORING

From the venerable MONSTER BRAINS (previously, previously, previously) comes the lost children's classic GODZILLA LIKES TO ROAR
posted by The Whelk on Oct 26, 2010 - 19 comments

Wake In Progress

Wake In Progress: Illustrations to Finnegan's Wake [via]
posted by brundlefly on Oct 25, 2010 - 17 comments

Anatomical illustrations from Edo-period Japan

Old anatomical illustrations that provide a unique perspective on the evolution of medical knowledge in Japan during the Edo period (1603-1868) [more inside]
posted by gman on Oct 14, 2010 - 27 comments

BiblioPulp

BiblioPulp
posted by Joe Beese on Oct 4, 2010 - 2 comments

Catlactus iz eatin yur planetz

You like cats. You like Marvel characters. You like Marvel characters as cats.
posted by Artw on Sep 17, 2010 - 31 comments

Vintage children's illustration

Flickr user katinthecupboard has scanned and posted nearly 2000 vintage illustrations, largely from children's books. Luckily they have been organized into collections and sets, and extensively tagged. There's so much in there that I hesitate to point out any individual images I especially like, but here's a few starters: A foppish Mercury, freezing child Jesus in modern city, children playing with sunbeam, boy with a bone-whistle, dancing fairies, bathing silhouettes and sailing ship and merman riding a sea creature.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 15, 2010 - 17 comments

[Warning—painted Victorian bosom below]

On Tor.com, Mefi'sown Patrick Garcon (smoke) is writing lively essays on Victorian fantasy illustration, from the Pre-Raphaelites to Orientalism. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Sep 3, 2010 - 12 comments

The Book of Imaginary Beings, Illustrated

Fantastic Zoology - A graphical interpretation of J.L. Borges "Book of Imaginary Beings" [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Aug 24, 2010 - 13 comments

Magda Boreysza

Art by Magda Boeysza. She's a graphic artist living in Scotland. Her sketchbook.
posted by nickyskye on Aug 22, 2010 - 12 comments

Beans and ?

Ampersand Food Groups by Dan Beckemeyer.
posted by sveskemus on Aug 14, 2010 - 11 comments

The Age of Uncertainty

The Age of Uncertainty is my new favorite blog. It's by a gentleman bookseller who works in a warehouse in Sussex processing lorryfuls of used books. He shares the most interesting things he finds, commenting with wit and sensitivity. He also writes entertainingly about his everyday life. Let me point you towards his series of extracts from a diary that came to his warehouse, detailing the life of Derek, an employee of the government who converted to Mormonism. It was a fairly normal life, but the excerpts are fascinating. Here are the entries in order: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. He also posts beautiful images he finds, such as Victorian color plates: 1 and 2. Still, it is the remains of ordinary lives washing up on his shores that most enthralls me, such as this tear-inducing post about a family photo album which was sent to his used books warehouse.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 13, 2010 - 27 comments

Red Eye

Red Eye, the latest from Christoph Niemann's Abstract City. [more inside]
posted by phunniemee on Aug 4, 2010 - 4 comments

"What garlic is to food, insanity is to art."

They Draw and Cook: The art world intersects with the food community at They Draw & Cook, a clever blog started earlier this year by sibling design and illustration team Nate Padavick and Salli Swindell (together they run Studio SSS). Each day, They Draw & Cook features a new recipe illustration by a practicing artist, illustrator, or designer. The recipes vary in both style and content and are submitted from all over the world.
posted by Fizz on Aug 2, 2010 - 7 comments

Because who doesn't like a visual?

Twaggies, turn your tweets into pics. Take random weird tweets and turn them into even weirder visuals. Twaggies, a website by Kiersten Essenpreis, features illustrations by the extraordinary @K_Essenpreis. (Essen is the German verb for “to eat” and preis means “praise.” So you better leave some nice comments for her or she’ll twag you most unfavorably.) The other half of the team is David Isreal, @resila, who can’t draw a stick figure much less a twaggie, but does all the other stuff for the blog and hit on the idea for it in the first place. Three additional twaggers have contributed in the past – @yaelbt, @mmbemer and @hsugene.
posted by Fizz on Jul 30, 2010 - 13 comments

Tenjō-sagari is watching you

Weirdly wonderful illustrations from 70s Japanese children's books by Gōjin Ishihara, including much nightmare fuel from the Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jul 30, 2010 - 24 comments

The Great Showdowns of Film History

"Since the beginning of time, there has been struggle. The epic clash of being against being. Tyrannosaurus Rex vs. Triceratops. Giant Squid vs. the Sperm Whale. The Circle vs. the Square. The struggle is forever. It makes the world turn around... This is a chronicling of some of the greatest confrontations in FILM HISTORY. The greatest moments of melee. These are the GREAT SHOWDOWNS. [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Jul 28, 2010 - 21 comments

Cosmology

The ancient Hebrew Conception of the Universe. Mayan Interdimensional Star Map. A scale model of the orbits of the planets in our solar system. More by Michael Paukner (via).
posted by Artw on Jul 14, 2010 - 28 comments

Things That Need To Be On The Side Of A Van #328

Paleontologists discover the skull of a massive predatory whale (Leviathan melvillei) in Peru. Discovery News presents this finding with the best of all possible illustrations. (via)
posted by The Whelk on Jul 1, 2010 - 71 comments

Another Day Another Dollar Another Lie

Stephen Doyle's Dollar Bill Illustrations (Interview)
posted by dobbs on Jun 25, 2010 - 6 comments

Creative Infographics ↓↓

Information is beautiful : 30 examples of creative infography
posted by Gyan on Jun 15, 2010 - 38 comments

Man As Industrial Palace

Artist Henning Lederer has adapted Fritz Kahn's illustration "Man As Industrial Palace" [previously] as an interactive installation. [via SciencePunk]
posted by brundlefly on Jun 14, 2010 - 2 comments

Kinder und Jugendbücher from the 18th century

A gallery of scanned German children's books from the 18th and 19th centuries. Sounds dry, but the plates are high-resolution and gorgeous. Fans of old-school engraving, illustration, and Bibliodyssey-esque curiosities will not be disappointed. Highly extensive and bandwidth-intensive.
posted by BlackLeotardFront on Jun 12, 2010 - 18 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 12