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A very vector story

The Adobe Illustrator Story. Watch the Illustrator story unfold, from its beginning as Adobe’s first software product, to its role in the digital publishing revolution, to becoming an essential tool for designers worldwide
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jul 31, 2014 - 43 comments

Gyo Fujikawa, Godmother of #WeNeedDiverseBooks

What do vintage ads for Beech-Nut, Q-Tips, and Eskimo Pie have in common with some of the earliest depictions of multiethnic babies in children's books? They were all the work of pioneering illustrator Gyo Fujikawa. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Jul 8, 2014 - 12 comments

No, Valenstein is the saint, not the adorable monster

Scaaaary Valenstein's Day cards for your ghoulfriend or blemmya. By Brian McLachlan, creator of the long-running (but now retired), pun-filled Princess Planet webcomic. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Feb 13, 2014 - 9 comments

TH€ s-!Mp$0NnS!

An entire episode of the Simpsons sent through various Alignment And Distrubution vector tools becomes a mesmerizing, glitched out work of art
posted by The Whelk on Sep 6, 2013 - 42 comments

The art of Jost Amman: woodcuts, some pared with poetry by Hans Sachs

Jost Amman (1539 – 1591) was a Swiss artist, best known for his woodcut illustrations. He was a prolific artist, with some 1,500 prints attributed to him, in the era when engravings were replacing woodcuttings. Amman also made stained glass (Google books preview) and jewelry, but there are more examples of his woodcut illustrations, as found on the colored cover of this bible from 1564, and the black and white images of biblical scenes. Amman's most widely know work is "the book of trades," Eygentliche Beschreibung Aller Stände auff Erden (Google books; PDFs of sections of the book). Ptak Science Books has 25 images with (most) job titles in English, and here is a full index of English titles, linking back to Wikimedia Commons. But that's only half of the book. The other part is the descriptions of the jobs, which are short poems by Hans Sachs, some of which are translated on the Victoria and Albert Museum.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 13, 2013 - 2 comments

RIP Creative Suite

After 10 years Adobe is retiring it's Creative Suite, and boxed versions of Photoshop, InDesign and other CS programs along with it. it will be replaced by the subscription only Creative Cloud.
posted by Artw on May 6, 2013 - 239 comments

Cartoon fables with strange reversals

Holy hotdogs, Spanish surrealist illustrator Joan Cornellà, just what the heck is going on?
posted by cortex on Apr 28, 2013 - 14 comments

British family Robinson: the short stories of three illustrators

Thomas Robinson and Eliza Heath had three sons, Thomas (1869-1950), Charles (1870-1937), and William (1872-1944), who followed in their father's (and grandfather's) footsteps as illustrators of various sorts. The most widely know was the youngest, W. Heath Robinson, whose contraptions earned him the reputation as the UK counterpart to the US artist Rube Goldberg. But the other two brothers are not to be overlooked. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 20, 2013 - 6 comments

The Art of Brian Sanders

Seventy-five year old Brian Sanders, classic illustrator, was tapped by Matt Weiner for the Mad Men Season Six Poster. Sanders and Weiner evidently used an illustration Sanders created in 1964 for inspiration.
posted by TrolleyOffTheTracks on Mar 12, 2013 - 23 comments

Tiago Hoisel is an exceptionally talented illustrator coming from Brazil

Tiago Hoisel is a cool illustrator from São Paulo, Brazil. his work focus on humorous illustrations. interview with him reveal a simple and talented character. examples of his work : 1, 2, 3, 4. more can be found here and here.
posted by Ahmed_Nabil on Jan 31, 2013 - 3 comments

mcbess: cartoon art of bearded men, busty women, and some dead pirates

Welcome to mcbess, a land of odd illustrations in black and white*, something of a dark and dingy take on Merry Melodies, where the men are bearded, and the ladies are toothy, busty (and often topless, in a vaguely NSFW cartoony way). There are also some large-scale illustrations with all those elements, and more. Matthieu Bessudo, aka mcbess, is also in a band, The Dead Pirates, and his art and music met with the video Wood (Vimeo; also on YouTube; more info here). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 28, 2013 - 8 comments

Albert Dubout

Albert Dubout (1905-1976) was a highly popular and prolific French cartoonist and illustrator, whose works were ubiquitous in France from the 1930s to the 1970s: Dubout illustrated books, film posters (notably those of Marcel Pagnol), magazines, advertisements, postcards and some of his cartoons were eventually adapted as a movie. Today, Dubout is best known as the creator of the Dubout couple (movie version; figurine version), consisting of a very large, full-bosomed, dominating, angry-looking wife with a diminutive, hapless and mustachioed husband in tow. Dubout's work is often highly detailed, and images larger than the tiny ones available on the official website are shown under the fold. [more inside]
posted by elgilito on Jan 26, 2013 - 2 comments

Add Some More Bourbon - One Day We'll All Be Dead

Saveur's utterly charming "Recipe Comix" features illustrated recipes/short stories by some of the web's best cartoonists covering a wide range of meals.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 21, 2013 - 14 comments

Mother Goose gone Addams

The Charles Addams Mother Goose
Three blind mice, see how they run!
They all ran after the farmer’s wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife.
Did you ever see such a sight in your life
As three blind mice?
Charles Addams, longtime New Yorker cartoonist illustrates the nursery rhymes of Mother Goose.
posted by caddis on Jan 8, 2013 - 16 comments

Illustrated Aesop's Fables through history

Historical versions of Aesop's fables - text and pictures - collected by Laura Gibbs. She gives thousands of historic texts in English, Latin, and Greek, but even better, has Flickr sets of the historic illustrations (that page is sorted by artist) from editions by Rackham, Caldecott, and other artists going back to the 1400s. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Aug 30, 2012 - 11 comments

Illustrations that made Edgar Allan Poe’s stories even more horrifying

In 1919, everyone wanted a copy of the deluxe edition of Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination, but not because it was bound in vellum with real gold lettering. It was because of these grim and gorgeous illustrations by Harry Clarke, which added an extra dose of horror to Poe's already terrifying tales. Tales of Mystery and Imagination, which collects many of Poe's most enduring horror stories, including "The Masque Of The Red Death," "The Pit And The Pendulum," "The Telltale Heart," and "The Fall Of The House Of Usher," was actually first collected and published in 1908, nearly 60 years after Poe's death. This edition was published by George Harrap & Co., and included 24-full page illustrations by Clarke. Even though the volume cost five guineas (somewhere in the neighborhood of $300 US), it was much in demand and made Clarke's reputation as an illustrator. It's easy to see why, with these gorgeous renditions of often gruesome subjects. See all 24 illustrations here.
posted by Lou Stuells on May 10, 2012 - 36 comments

This Adventurous and Terrifying World, with James W. Buel

James William Buel was a journalist, author, and editor, who was born in 1849 in Golconda, Illinois, and died in 1920 in San Diego, California. In his life, he traveled the world, writing and illustrating adventure tales about the wilds of Africa and the American West, and other exciting parts of the world. Many of his books are on Archive.org, ranging from America's Wonderlands, as delineated by pen and camera and Mysteries and Miseries of America's Great Cities, embracing New York, Washington City, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and New Orleans; to Russian Nihilism and Exile Life in Siberia, with over 200 splendid engravings, and Sea and Land [microform] : an illustrated history of the wonderful and curious things of nature existing before and since the deluge (including a great number of creatures who apparently found joy in terrorizing and devouring people).
posted by filthy light thief on May 3, 2012 - 1 comment

A Motion Comic

The Art of Pho by award-winning British illustrator and animator Julian Hanshaw is a moving and surreal story in interactive animation about a creature named Little Blue and his relationship with Ho Chi Minh City. In Vietnam's bustling capital Little Blue learns to master the art of making Pho - Vietnam's ubiquitous national noodle dish. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Apr 16, 2012 - 11 comments

An Illustrator of Decadence

Best known for his 1929 illustrations of Les Fleurs du Mal by Charles Baudelaire (translated here); Beresford Egan (wiki) also illustrated the dust jacket for Aleister Crowley´s Moonchild.
The year previously he published an illustrated parody on the banning of Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness.
In 1934 he published But the Sinners Triumph. His first wife was Catherine Bower Alcock aka Brian De Shane.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 8, 2012 - 6 comments

Avant-garde rooted in nineteenth century aesthethicism

Santiago Caruso is an Illustrator from Buenos Aires who sometimes refers to himself as a graphic journalist. He has illustrated books and both album and book covers. He blogs here.
Discovered via The Cabinet of the Solar Plexus Some links NSFW.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 7, 2012 - 3 comments

Time keeps on slippin'

We've all seen variations on the personal time-lapse video -- a snapshot every day for six years, or a look at a young girl's first decade. But nobody's done it quite like Sam Klemke. For thirty-five years the itinerant freelance cartoonist has documented his life in short year-end reviews, a funny, weary, eccentric, and hopeful record dating all the way back to 1977. Recently optioned for documentary treatment by the government of Australia, you can skim Sam's opus in reverse in the striking video "35 Years Backwards Thru Time with Sam Klemke," an ever-evolving home movie montage that grows grainier and grainier as it tracks Sam "from a paunchy middle aged white bearded self deprecating schluby old fart, to a svelt, full haired, clean shaven, self-important but clueless 20 year old."
posted by Rhaomi on Dec 31, 2011 - 7 comments

Pauline Baynes

Pauline Baynes: Queen of Narnia and Middle-Earth
posted by puny human on Mar 28, 2011 - 18 comments

Chris Ware Interview

An interview with Chris Ware from May 2010 at the international Copenhagen comics festival. Ware is the creator of Acme Novelty Library and Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. (via kottke) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4
posted by BitterOldPunk on Mar 22, 2011 - 9 comments

Jazz Age Illustrator

Georges Lepape was an Art Deco fashion illustrator; whose work became iconic.
Perhaps most famous for his collaborations with the designer Paul Poiret.
He worked for many magazines, among them the Gazette Du Bon Ton, Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and Les Feuillets D'Art, and Vanity Fair where his March 1927 cover illustration launched the modeling career of Lee Miller.
Some more of his illustrations on flickr and a brief biography. (Related Lee Miller; haute-couture)
posted by adamvasco on Nov 26, 2010 - 4 comments

The prettiest things in life are useless

Stuff no one told me (but I learned anyways) [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Jun 17, 2010 - 56 comments

Pencil vs Camera

Ben Heine is a Belgian painter, illustrator, portraitist, caricaturist and photographer. His recent project, Pencil vs. Camera, is an amalgam of illustration and photography, creating something similar in a single image showing two different actions. His Flickr Photostream.
posted by netbros on May 2, 2010 - 3 comments

Andy Smith draws real good

Can't talk, too busy looking at Andy Smith's art and typography
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Feb 18, 2009 - 7 comments

I like coffee so much that I have tea for breakfast

Christoph Niemann illustrates: his sons' obsession with the NYC subway (previously), bathroom tile art, New York cheat sheets, and his experiences with coffee (illustrated with coffee on napkins). Check out his excellent portfolio of illustrations and don't miss the ones on illustrating. You can see Niemann talk a bit about his work here.
posted by parudox on Dec 26, 2008 - 18 comments

Preliminary sketches of Tony Blair invariably had the PM knocking off the head of a robot.

When the House of Commons required a portrait of outgoing PM Tony Blair, to whom did they turn? Phil Hale. [more inside]
posted by infinitewindow on Nov 15, 2008 - 22 comments

Miroslav Sasek

'Welcome to the wonderful world of Miroslav Sasek. This site is devoted to the life and works of the Czech artist, illustrator and author of the This is series of children's books.' From the equally wonderful I Like.
posted by Alec on Aug 19, 2007 - 8 comments

His best works feature powerful women in vulnerable situations.

Filipino-American artist Jhoneil Centeno is a painter, photographer, digital artist, game developer, and bow and arrow maker. He explains his art and his technique. Title quote from Lucid Skin review (NSFW).
posted by desjardins on Aug 16, 2007 - 11 comments

Resources for Web Developers

The Learn List is attempting to become a comprehensive online resource for free tutorials in Flash, PhotoShop, Fireworks, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, ActionScript, PHP, CSS & XML.
posted by jonson on Jul 7, 2007 - 22 comments

This is not Angelina Jolie

The World's Most Photorealistic Vector Art Is it as impressive as we have already seen ? [first link mildly NSFW]
posted by The Radish on Aug 6, 2006 - 34 comments

The incredible challenge of recreating reality

Fun with Photoshop and Illustrator Incredibly detailed photo-realistic image of the Chicago Transit Authority's Damen Station [map]. Here's a similar photo. [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Apr 10, 2006 - 31 comments

Mark Stivers

Mark Stivers is a piano tuner in Sacramento and a very funny cartoonist
posted by growabrain on Apr 12, 2005 - 19 comments

Illustrator for Windows

The Corpus Vitrearum Medii Aevi now has a digital archive containing 10,000 images of medieval stained glass from English churches and cathedrals: a wonderful resource for anyone interested in medieval art. These stunning images of the windows at Fairford, in Gloucestershire, are just a tiny fraction of the extraordinary riches available on the site.
posted by verstegan on Jul 24, 2004 - 14 comments

The future we were promised.

An exhibit of the art of Radebaugh and what the future looked like from the 50's. "The post-World War II optimism that pervaded the nation extended to the not-too-distant future, with its promise of spaceship-traveled skyways whirring in a utopia of streamlined cityscapes. Now, the works of A.C. Radebaugh -- a top illustrator of the day whose works helped define that future-vision -- are being shown in a retrospective at a quirky art gallery obsessed with Americana of the mid-20th century."
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Mar 31, 2003 - 1 comment

Adobe's Mac Support Wavering?

A study posted at Adobe's website describes how traditionally Mac-centric tasks (rendering using After Effects, Illustrator & Photoshop) are all faster on a PC. These kinds of studies are a dime a dozen; what's interesting isn't which platform is faster, but that Adobe would host a page proclaiming the PC is the "preferred" platform for such tasks. Given the notoriously fickle folks at Quark, I would have pegged Adobe as the biggest Mac boosters in the third party software market. Are times changing?
posted by jonson on Mar 26, 2003 - 49 comments

Scriptographer

Scriptographer is an Adobe Illustrator plugin that allows usage of Javascript to extend the functionality of the program. Looks really interesting. Short on examples right now, but the documentation and whatnot is all there. [Note: Major dHTML usage on the page. No stupid window resizing and such, though.]
posted by Su on Feb 16, 2002 - 9 comments

The Vertigo Tarot

The Vertigo Tarot by Dave McKean, illustrator of among many other good things the Sandman comics, was reissued in August. The cards, loosely based on characters from DCs Vertigo comic inprint, are among the most uneasily beautiful interpretations I've ever seen. The original set was in a limited edition of 5000 copies and is changing hands for suitably outrageous sums on ebay. The new edition (slightly smaller cards) retails around the $30 mark.
posted by thatwhichfalls on Nov 14, 2001 - 14 comments

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