781 posts tagged with india.
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Prince who became a pauper in Delhi

Tales from India's First War of Independence Eyewitness accounts of survivors of the Mughal family who fled from Shahjahanabad (Old Delhi) after the Revolt of 1857.
posted by infini on Oct 8, 2016 - 5 comments

examining the sensorium of political engagement between humans & animals

"A prominent animal rights activist in New Delhi, explaining her relentlessness on behalf of animals, said to me the following: "I only wish there were a slaughterhouse next door. To witness that violence, to hear those screams... I would never be able to rest." She was not alone among animal welfare activists in India in linking the witnessing of violence against an animal to the creation of a profound bond that demanded from her a life of responsibility. I argue in this article that this moment of witnessing constitutes an intimate event in tethering human to nonhuman, expanding ordinary understandings of the self and its possible social relations, potentially blowing the conceit of humanity apart." Witness: Humans, Animals, and the Politics of Becoming, an essay by Naisargi N. Dave. [cw: contains vivid text/visuals describing non-human animal suffering and death*] [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Oct 6, 2016 - 16 comments

'Praying is not enough'

Hundreds of Buddhist nuns trained in Kung Fu are cycling through the Himalayas to oppose human trafficking
posted by infini on Sep 19, 2016 - 23 comments

Indian government blacks out internet in Kashmir

Kashmir, where over 50 civilian protesters have been killed in recent days and where the Indian government has imposed a physical curfew in places to prevent more protests, has also been subjected to a total "e-curfew": both mobile and broadband internet have been shut down by the Indian government, the former for over a month now (link, link, link). [more inside]
posted by splitpeasoup on Aug 13, 2016 - 14 comments

A look at Hindu Nationalism under Modi

The New Face of India Is the Anti-Gandhi - "The violence, insecurity, and rage of Narendra Modi." (via)
posted by kliuless on Aug 13, 2016 - 23 comments

Indian activist ends 16-year hunger strike to enter politics

In 2000, Irom Sharmila began a hunger strike to protest the Malom Massacre and India's statutory immunity from judicial oversight for military and paramilitary personnel in "disturbed areas". After years of detention (attempted suicide is illegal in India), forced feeding, and recognition from human rights agencies, Sharmila ended her hunger strike with a lick of honey and a declaration that she will run for office to work against the Armed Forces Special Powers Acts. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Aug 10, 2016 - 2 comments

Chill Indian cooking

Indian cooking doesn't get any more genuine than this guy cooking all kinds of delicious dishes in his village: chicken kulambu, prawns, fish kulambu, octopus kulambu , duck. There's also these street food videos on nendran chips, making biryani for 500 people, egg noodles for 40 people.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Aug 7, 2016 - 19 comments

Lest we forget

European refugees in India, Africa and the Middle East
During World War II in Europe over 40 million refugees sought shelter away from the catastrophic bloodshed that engulfed the continent for over six years.
posted by infini on Jul 26, 2016 - 12 comments

Crisis on high

At the top of the world a climate disaster is unfolding that will impact the lives of more than 1 billion people.
posted by smoke on Jul 24, 2016 - 46 comments

If you want to understand Kabali from a Malaysian Indian perspective

Visithra Manikam writes about the various facets of Malaysian Indian life that Indian moviegoers might have missed in Kabali 'Kabali is our story. The story of Indian Malaysians and not Indian immigrants who now come to work in Malaysia or NRIs. We are not same. [...] I realised a lot of reviews are being written based on Indian cultural experience rather than the actual Malaysian culture and issues. ' [more inside]
posted by cendawanita on Jul 23, 2016 - 19 comments

Natural Style: Menswear designer Suket Dhir

"I am my own muse, I design for myself," says Suket Dhir, this year's winner of the International Woolmark Prize. And, according to one style editor, "he could be the first Indian designer to conquer the world of Western menswear." [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Jul 22, 2016 - 10 comments


Marriage and economics have never been independent of one another. The relationship between the two in the affairs of men and women is memorably dramatised in this story by Narendranath Mitra, one of Bengal’s greatest short-story writers. And the narrative time of the story and the arc of the romances within it are marked, too, by the cycle of the seasons in a rural economy, as seen through the life of the protagonist, Motalef, a tapper of palm-trees.
posted by infini on Jul 15, 2016 - 5 comments

Globalization before Its Time: Kutchi traders

The Arabian Sea has a special place in Indian business history. For centuries the cities and settlements on the Arabian Sea littoral traded with each other, exchanging Indian textiles for horse, armaments, pearls and ivory. In turn, some of the textiles were passed on to the Atlantic slave trade in Africa as a medium of exchange, or sent overland to European markets. Coastal merchants* indigenous to the region bordering the sea engaged in this business and developed sophisticated systems of banking and shipbuilding to support the mercantile enterprise. The Hindu and Muslim traders of Kachchh were examples of such groups of people. text via [more inside]
posted by infini on Jul 8, 2016 - 7 comments

Bera, ek Club Sandwich aur ek Chota Peg lao, jaldi!

If you ever had the dal tadka or the Club Sandwich and wondered who to thank, you may want to look at our Colonial Rulers and their second big gift: the Dak Bungalow.
More on colonial food from the British Raj. Recipes. Old recipes. Controversy in Portland. What came back Home. Comparisons. Hang on, deliciousness aside, what is a Dak Bungalow?
posted by infini on Jun 12, 2016 - 7 comments

The crumbling glories of Kolkata, "City of Palaces"

Photographer Ritayan Mukherjee documents Kolkata's deteriorating historical mansions in the neighborhoods of Shovabazar, Bagbazar, and old Chitpur, once home to the Bengali economic and culture elite, and the stage for the city's intellectual renaissance of the 19th and early 20th century.
posted by drlith on Jun 9, 2016 - 12 comments

The Story of India

The Story of India, written and presented by Michael Wood for the BBC, is a six episode documentary that serves as an entertaining and solid introduction to Indian history. All six episodes are available in full (6 hrs). [more inside]
posted by cwest on Jun 9, 2016 - 22 comments

Living with Leopards

Mumbai is home to an estimated 20 million people ... and 21 leopards. The 250,000 residents with homes inside the boundary of Sanjay Gandhi National Park find a way to live with their big-cat neighbours.
posted by ChuraChura on Jun 3, 2016 - 8 comments

It's getting hot in there.

Newsfilter: India just set a new all-time record high temperature — 123.8 degrees
posted by analogue on May 22, 2016 - 66 comments

My chow mein beats your chop suey anyday

Chandrima S. Bhattacharya traces the journey of the ubiquitous Calcutta chowmin [more inside]
posted by infini on May 18, 2016 - 10 comments

Where Did It All Go Wrong?

Free Basics: Facebook's Biggest Setback From Zuckerberg’s vantage point, high above the connected world he had helped create, India was a largely blank map. [more inside]
posted by modernnomad on May 12, 2016 - 48 comments

Roots of Goa (Trance): a sound that was both accessible and otherworldly

... at the same time that Chicago was creating House and Detroit was forging ahead with what would become Techno, the roots of Trance were being sawn on the beaches of Anjuna and Vagator. And just as Chicago had Ron Hardy and Detroit had The Electrifying Mojo, Goa had a DJ called Laurent. If it wasn’t for him, it’s quite possible that the music played at parties in Goa would have been little more than a carbon copy of what was going on back in Europe and America. Unveiling The Secret: The Roots of Trance - before Goa was Goa, it was "new electronic music coming out of Europe and America," sliced and edited by Laurent to make one long, constantly morphing psychedelic groove. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 5, 2016 - 64 comments

Usha Uthup: not your average playback singer

Celebrated Indian recording artist and playback singer Usha Uthup, AKA Usha Iyer, has performed many different musical styles during her 47-year career: smokey jazz and pop on the 1968 album Scotch and Soda, funk and disco on 1978's Usha in Nairobi (song: Fever), disco and new wave for numerous films, and across the spectrum in this scene from the 1972 comedy Bombay to Goa. (Yes, that's Amitabh Bachchan in his first leading role.) Uthup is also not afraid to embrace the unusual, as shown on her weirdly wonderful 1984 album, Blast-Off. [more inside]
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide on May 2, 2016 - 7 comments

"The rest of this ride is mine to take. By myself..."

Nagpur Junction: A Short Tragicomic [via mefi projects]
posted by Theta States on Apr 28, 2016 - 12 comments

"A cautionary tale of mangled crisis management on an epic scale."

Nestlé’s Half-Billion-Dollar Noodle Debacle in India
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 26, 2016 - 41 comments

Meet Neetu

A Child Bride at 13, She's Turned Herself Into A Prize-Winning Wrestler
posted by alligatorpear on Apr 25, 2016 - 22 comments

"Severity always, justice when possible"

The Lure of Everest
With their empire in tatters, postwar Britons were desperate for a source of renewal to pierce their collective mourning; they needed grand projects to restore national pride. They looked eastward, and up. Starting in 1920 the lexicon and tactics of war were applied to the attempts to scout and conquer Everest. Vast expeditions — the first in 1903-4 had taken a load so hefty that 88 porters died of exhaustion — made their way across the Tibetan plateau.
- writes Holly Morris in the NYT review of Into The Silence, a book by Wade Davis of the National Geographic Society covering the British Everest expeditions of 1921, '22, and '24. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 19, 2016 - 25 comments

Indian Geek Jams ahoy

Tushar Lall arranges Indian classical music versions of well-known pop culture soundtracks. The latest release is Star Wars; there's also Harry Potter, Interstellar, Game of Thrones, Pirates of the Caribbean and BBC Sherlock.
posted by divabat on Apr 18, 2016 - 3 comments

The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

The mysterious and useful Vegetable Lamb of Tartary: a plant whose ripe seed-pods yield tiny live lambs. Or was it a plant growing in the shape of a full-size lamb, but with an umbilical tether to the ground? (Oh, and do you know about the barnacle goose?) A tale from the medieval science grapevine. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Apr 8, 2016 - 7 comments

An Open (and Open Source) Campaign Takes on Facebook

How a diverse, self-organized group of volunteers took on Facebook (and won). [more inside]
posted by HE Amb. T. S. L. DuVal on Apr 3, 2016 - 20 comments

A Few News Items

A short story by Shrilal Shukla, translated from Hindi by Daisy Rockwell. Wherein a politician enters the real world of his constituents.
posted by bardophile on Feb 23, 2016 - 3 comments

"Coolie Women Are in Demand Here"

I was made to recite the story of my greatgrandmother, to the extent that I knew it: Her name was Sujaria, and this was her village. The British took her away in 1903 to work their sugar plantations in a place now known as Guyana. She sailed on a ship called The Clyde. My grandfather was born on that ship.
Gaiutra Bahadur traces the story of her great grandmother's singular journey as indentured labour meant for the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, shedding light on the lives of women in British India over a hundred years ago.
posted by infini on Feb 23, 2016 - 11 comments

not the usual bhaji

The Best Dishes From Every Indian State And Their Authentic Recipes Are Right Here
posted by infini on Jan 29, 2016 - 33 comments

India's first all-trans-women band

The 6-Pack Band, a collaboration between Bollywood composer Shamir Tandon and Indian tea brand Brooke Bond Red Label, consists of 6 women from the hijra community in India. They have two singles out: Hum Hain Happy, a remix of Pharrel Williams's Happy, and Sab Rab De Bande (with playback singer Sonu Nigam) based on a central Sikhism tenet of "we are all children of God".
posted by divabat on Jan 28, 2016 - 15 comments

The Death of a Very Tired Man

He was no ordinary man. For 13 years, he was the custodian of the dead.
posted by bardophile on Jan 21, 2016 - 14 comments

India and Pakistan Wagah Border Closing Ceremony

India and Pakistan Wagah Border Closing Ceremony A little explanation : "The lowering of the flags, or the Beating Retreat ceremony at Wagah border, is a daily military practice that the security forces of India (Border Security Force) and Pakistan (Pakistan Rangers) have jointly followed since 1959.The drill is characterized by elaborate and rapid dance-like maneuvers, which has been described as "colorful" .It is alternatively a symbol of the two countries' rivalry, as well as brotherhood and cooperation between the two nations." from the Wiki.
posted by St. Alia of the Bunnies on Jan 1, 2016 - 19 comments

"The food is authentic in spirit."

"It was Asian enough for my immigrant parents and American enough for my sister and me." In the PBS feature documentary, Off The Menu, filmmaker Grace Lee traverses the US into the kitchens, factories, temples and farm of Asian Pacific America that explores how our relationship to food reflects our evolving communities. Food Republic spoke with Jonathan Wu and Wilson Tang, whose NYC restaurant, Fung Tu, is featured in the film.
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 31, 2015 - 4 comments

“Fiction is Truth's elder sister.”

An unexpected revival for the ‘bard of empire’. [The Guardian] ‘Vulgar rabble-rouser’, ‘rootless cosmopolitan’, ‘mouthpiece of the empire’ Rudyard Kipling has had his share of detractors. But, 150 years after his birth, interest in India’s greatest English-language writer is growing.
They are not alone. Kipling, the “bard of empire”, has always been difficult to place in the cultural pantheon. Britain, too, has done remarkably little to officially mark the sesquicentenary of its first winner (in 1907) of the Nobel prize for literature (and still the youngest ever from anywhere). Indian-born, yet British? We are already entering the muddy field of contradictions that sometimes bog down the reputation of this mild-mannered man. Yet it is these that make him uniquely appealing and that, belying top-level institutional indifference, are sparking an unexpected revival of interest in him, and in particular in his role as a commentator on the origins of an integrated global culture.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Dec 26, 2015 - 90 comments

A scam like this is going to take years to investigate

Rather than a simple scam, Vyapam appears to be a vast societal swindle—one that reveals the hollowness at the heart of practically every Indian state institution: inadequate schools, a crushing shortage of meaningful jobs, a corrupt government, a cynical middle class happy to cheat the system to aid their own children, a compromised and inept police force and a judiciary incapable of enforcing its laws.
Aman Sethi writes in the Guardian on the so-called Vyapam scam—allegations of high-level and systematic corruption in the administration of the state professional examinations that determine entry into medical schools, state colleges, and entry-level civil service jobs within the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The scandal has been connected with 48 suspicious deaths involving people implicated in or investigating the scandal. The Indian Express has a timeline of events, while the Times of India has an extensive archive of further coverage.
posted by Sonny Jim on Dec 18, 2015 - 15 comments

Madonna, Christ and Mughal Paintings

The paintings commissioned by Akbar and Jahangir were a blend of Western iconography with Indian and Islamic elements. [more inside]
posted by infini on Dec 15, 2015 - 11 comments

how to look at the art of the British empire

There can be few more contentious subjects than the empire, and few artistic legacies more explosive. Now, Tate Britain is to hold the first major British exhibition of masterworks from the colonial period – and the results are revealing - William Dalrymple writes
posted by infini on Dec 12, 2015 - 22 comments

Style Out There

Asha Leo of Refinery29 travels around the world to learn about international fashion subcultures and the way fashion affects society worldwide. So far she's met Gothic (and other) Lolitas in Amsterdam, Moroccan expat culture, hijra in India, Hasidic designers in Brooklyn, Korean matchy-matchy fashion for couples, and the highly colorful world of Japanese decora.
posted by divabat on Nov 30, 2015 - 6 comments

"I felt like, 'Whoa!'"

Called "2g Tuesday, Facebook will give employees super slow internet speeds once a week so they can better understand markets like India
posted by artsandsci on Oct 28, 2015 - 61 comments

Your creep is not even a legit creep

Indian comedy group All India Bakchod teams up with dating site TrulyMadly to present the Creep Qawwali (a form of Sufi devotional music), lamenting online and offline creepy guys. [more inside]
posted by divabat on Oct 20, 2015 - 21 comments

Colonising Force

An influx of Indian users ruffles Quora. Responding to the question “What turns people off about Quora?,” the user David Stewart wrote, in 2013, “The large, and steadily increasing, Indian presence.” The answer has earned him over 3,400 upvotes. [more inside]
posted by splitpeasoup on Oct 18, 2015 - 156 comments

"..the Glaswegian origin story is definitively a crock of shit."

Who Owns Chicken Tikka Masala? Complicating a popular origin story.
posted by Miko on Oct 16, 2015 - 31 comments

I have water but can you drink from my hands?

In 1992-1994 and 2005-2009, Yuka Makino studied the lopping practices in the oak forests of Garwhal, Himalaya. Her PhD dissertation (PDF) contains a fascinating prologue describing the practical and ethical issues for conducting ethnographic research in an area where distrust of outsiders runs high and where gender and caste norms are strictly enforced. One afternoon, several children came and were chatting with us when a 10-year-old girl joined us. Though she still took part in the conversation in a loud voice, she stood at the edge of the veranda, far away from the door. (...) I realized that she was a Scheduled Caste girl and if she had stood at the doorway her shadow would have fallen into the room and may have touched my assistant’s plate of food, contaminating or polluting it. I let her stand there so that neither she nor my assistant would feel uncomfortable. [more inside]
posted by elgilito on Oct 14, 2015 - 7 comments

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body

The tragic tale of Mt Everest’s most famous dead body is part one of a two part BBC article centered around the story of Tsewang Paljor, known as "Green Boots", whose body has remained for 20 years near the summit where he died. Part two is Death in the clouds: The problem with Everest’s 200+ bodies [more inside]
posted by danny the boy on Oct 9, 2015 - 77 comments


Dabbawalla: Fast, efficient, and proud, Mumbai’s teams of home-to-work lunch couriers connect families through meals cooked with love. [more inside]
posted by Shouraku on Oct 8, 2015 - 22 comments

Passengers 'rush to be in my bus'

Vankadarath Saritha, Delhi's first female bus driver - "Women have been to space so why can't we drive a bus?"
posted by kliuless on Oct 6, 2015 - 9 comments

A Sewing Machine, Murder, and the Absence of Regret

Why Has India's 'Beef' Lynching Sparked No Remorse? Ravish Kumar writes for NDTV about the killing of Mohammad Akhlaq: We are not understanding what is happening around us. We are not being able to make others understand. The sparks have been spread across our villages. Young men with their half-baked sense of history want me to pose with them for selfies, but are not willing to even consider my appeal that they give up their violent ideals. [more inside]
posted by frumiousb on Oct 3, 2015 - 46 comments

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