Skip

39 posts tagged with insect.
Displaying 1 through 39 of 39. Subscribe:

How could you not want More Spider?!

Entomologist and photographer Alex Wild on the process of photographing a funnel-web spider: These Spider Fangs Aren’t Going To Photograph Themselves. "Most photographs involve some combination of creativity and constraint, and this one was no different." [more inside]
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Aug 25, 2014 - 47 comments

It's so dark in there, it took us a long time to notice

Cave insect species discovered in which the female has a penis and the male has a vagina.
posted by Pater Aletheias on Apr 17, 2014 - 35 comments

That stings!

Macro photos of insects stinging. What it says on the label - don't click if seeing insects biting and stinging squicks you out. Remarkable photos though.
posted by leslies on Jan 4, 2014 - 17 comments

Insect Intricacies

Painstakingly assembled insect sculptures by Edouard Martinet (more images on his Press page).
posted by cenoxo on Dec 26, 2013 - 3 comments

USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab's macro insect photography

The USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Program designs and develops large and small-scale surveys and identification tools for native bees. A vital aspect of the program is to create accurate and detailed pictures of native bees as well as the plants and insects they interact with. To that end, Sam Droege has curated a collection of more than 1,200 macro photos of insects and posted them to the USGS NBIaMP Flickr collection. You can also browse via sets, if the unfiltered collection is too much to take in at once. This group has also provided a guide to taking macro photographs of insects in a lab setting (PDF).
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 19, 2013 - 11 comments

Geared for jumping

Intermeshing, rotating mechanical gears have been found in an insect. The gears act to ensure that the legs of the hopping insect move at the same rate when jumping, and are lost during molting to an adult stage. Via reddit, where the journalist is participating. Science magazine report (paywalled).
posted by exogenous on Sep 13, 2013 - 52 comments

On the slippery slope to Mecha-Mothra

Turns out moths are pretty good at operating small robotic vehicles.
posted by prize bull octorok on May 9, 2013 - 17 comments

"Nature means necessity."

First Evidence Found for Photosynthesis in Insects: [nature.com] "The biology of aphids is bizarre: they can be born pregnant and males sometimes lack mouths, causing them to die not long after mating. In an addition to their list of anomalies, work published this week indicates that they may also capture sunlight and use the energy for metabolic purposes."
posted by Fizz on Aug 18, 2012 - 26 comments

Some spiders work and hunt in groups.

The deadly social web: Anelosimus eximius, also known as the South American Social Spider, are spiders that work together to repair webs and capture and kill prey much larger than any single spider.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on May 13, 2012 - 58 comments

Better red than dead

Recently Starbuck's customers were upset to learn that their strawberry frappuchinos were being coloured red with insect extract - cochineal. What they probably don't know is that cochineal was once as valuable as gold and silver and is the colour of Catholic Cardinals' robes and the red in the British redcoats of the Revolutionary War.
posted by GuyZero on Apr 19, 2012 - 136 comments

The Gift That Keeps On Hissing

Unsure what to give your special someone for Valentines Day this year? Why not give their name to one of the Bronx Zoo's 58,000 Madagascar hissing cockroaches.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 27, 2012 - 47 comments

Our new insect overlord would like a carrot

Former park ranger Mark W Moffett (aka Doctor Bugs) has found a Giant Weta on Little Barrier Island in New Zealand that might be the world's heaviest insect. It weighs three times more than a mouse. Oh yeah, it also eats carrots.
posted by Slack-a-gogo on Dec 1, 2011 - 75 comments

World Record Bugs

The University of Florida Book of Insect Records (UFBIR) names insect champions and documents their achievements. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Nov 30, 2011 - 9 comments

“Why do we eat shrimp and crawfish but not their brethren on land?”

The San Francisco Street Food Festival is an annual Summer event in the Mission District that features around 60 different Bay Area vendors and is attended by tens of thousands of foodies. This year the usual mainstays were joined by Don Bugito, which served up insect-based dishes and billed itself as the first "PreHispanic Snackeria." When the food truck commences permanent operations this month, it may be the first eatery in the country devoted exclusively to preparations involving insects. But they're not the only entomophagy pioneers in San Francisco, where Bug Cuisine is Booming. So just how tasty are insects? (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 5, 2011 - 30 comments

No, not Jamie Lee Curtis

Freshly hatched at London's Natural History Museum - a gynandromorph butterfly. [more inside]
posted by FatherDagon on Jul 12, 2011 - 32 comments

Not your average, everyday locust swarm...

That time has come again, the magical time of the century when the, somewhat creepy, bugs we know as the cicada appear. [more inside]
posted by RolandOfEld on May 18, 2011 - 105 comments

Sexless, Striving, and Ten Billion Strong

E.O Wilson: Ants are a lot like us. Deborah Gordon: No, ants are like ants.
posted by The Whelk on Oct 24, 2010 - 35 comments

Raptors, Owls, Bats Guard South African World Cup Stadium

Open air sports stadiums often have issues with birds, insects, and other wildlife. Common preventative measures include ultrasonic devices and bird netting. But Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium - one of the venues for the 2010 World Cup - has taken an all-natural approach. It is working with the Urban Raptor Project to install raptors, bats, and owls to patrol the stadium for various pests, while a trained peregrine falcon chases away crows. This is not a new technique - Millennium Stadium in Wales has long used a Harris Hawk for bird control. But according to the NMB stadium manager, it "is the only stadium with a programme like this in place as a pest deterrent".
posted by gemmy on May 31, 2010 - 12 comments

The gall of it all

Galls or plant galls are abnormal outgrowths of plant tissues. Some are hideous and some strangely beautiful, and some can even be mistaken for an actual crop of the tree. Galls often form due to insects or fungi, but the plant is an unwilling and helpless partner.
posted by rosswald on Mar 7, 2010 - 23 comments

The life of an ant colony, with a touch of poetic license

Trailhead, the life of an ant colony, as dramatized by E.O. Wilson.
posted by shivohum on Jan 27, 2010 - 15 comments

Smile for the camera

North American Insects and Spiders - 7000+ close-ups of wolf spiders, black widows, honeybees, a ladybug eating an aphid, gulf fritillary butterflies, praying mantises, and much, much more
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jul 17, 2009 - 44 comments

Smells Like Spartacus

The Uprising Of The Ants: "Alexandra Achenbach and Susanne Foitzik from Ludwig Maximillians Universty in Munich found that some of the kidnapped workers don't bow to the whims of their new queen. Once they have matured, they start killing the pupae of their captors, destroying as many as two-thirds of the colony's brood. "
posted by The Whelk on Apr 2, 2009 - 32 comments

VIDEO BUG EAT EAT EAT

Young American woman eats praying mantis. Asian woman eats large black scorpion. Young Asian woman eating insect while exploitative Westerner goads her. Drunk American woman eats cicada, with much trepidation. Middle aged western man eats giant chinese cockroach. Katie eats a potato bug.
posted by Meatbomb on Feb 10, 2009 - 54 comments

"I feel very fortunate to have it eat my flowers..."

Ladies and gentlemen, may I present the Fluorescent Pink Katydid [more inside]
posted by chuckdarwin on Nov 30, 2008 - 36 comments

Close-ups of insects

The Insect Close-ups Flickr Pool is full of fascinating pictures. There are all kinds of wonderful images to be found, of spiders, ladybugs, hornets, aphids, grasshoppers, worms, water striders and those superstars of the insect world, bees and butterflies. You can also search a map for pictures by location. If you want to take your own bug photographer Mark Plonsky has written a short how-to guide. He has taken some pretty great photographs of insects himself.
posted by Kattullus on Nov 21, 2008 - 14 comments

Lookin' for a home...

In the little town of Enterprise, Alabama, there stands a bizarre statue that would make any card-carrying surrealist proud: an archetypical Greek goddess raises her arms toward heaven and holds high above her head... an enormous insect. Of course, it's the boll weevil. That cotton-eatin' critter inspired not only the world's only monument to an agricultural pest, but some great tunes as well, from a wide range of artists. [note: see hoverovers for link descriptions] [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 15, 2008 - 35 comments

Insects. Made of paper.

What would make origami cool? Insects, of course! Click "写真の一覧" for thumbnails. [more inside]
posted by Citizen Premier on Sep 16, 2007 - 12 comments

Robotic Insect Takes Off

Miniature Robotic Insect Takes Off Researchers have created a miniature robotic fly that weighs just 60 milligrams and has a wingspan of three centimeters for covert surveillance. Thats progress!
posted by ItsaMario on Jul 22, 2007 - 17 comments

giant creepy things want to eat you

giant creepy things want to eat you
posted by MetaMonkey on Feb 4, 2007 - 37 comments

Fear Teh Google

Google Demonstrates Capabilities of Space Based Weapon on 50m Insect Menacing German Town All you folks saying Google wasn't out to take over the world, where are your arguments now? Google now has the capability to destroy enormous mutant bugs from space.
posted by fenriq on Jan 5, 2007 - 23 comments

The Origins and Evolution of Intelligence

The origins and evolution of human intelligence: parasitic insects? viruses? mushrooms? neural darwinism? foraging? machiavellian competition? emergence? or something else?
posted by MetaMonkey on Jul 24, 2006 - 26 comments

Hornets, gentle giants

The Asian Giant Hornet is cool, unless it's baked. Japanese honeybees can detect the hornet's secretion and they attack en masse. With approximately 500 honeybees surrounding the hornet in a tight ball, the temperature within the cluster rises to 47 degrees Celsius which bakes the hornet alive.
posted by tellurian on Jun 8, 2006 - 35 comments

Mosquito Menace

Winnipeg's mosquito population explodes "Heavy rains throughout June and early July have flooded farmlands and fields, leaving pools of water that are perfect for mosquito breeding." The Manitoba government has ordered Winnipeg to spray the controversial chemical malathion across the city. A survey reveals that the vast majority of Manitobans who have contracted West Nile virus have no idea they have been infected. Recommended repellants have contained the chemical DEET and sixty percent of Americans shy away from any insect repellent, even when the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus is a serious threat. CDC has more information and FAQ about insect repellent use and safety.
posted by webmeta on Jul 15, 2005 - 15 comments

desperate houseflies

Desperate Houseflies : "In the backdrop of a picture-perfect neighborhood called Diphtheria Lane live six suburban houseflies whose lives are anything but perfect."
posted by dhruva on Feb 24, 2005 - 9 comments

Insect sounds

Insect sounds : "but have you heard a rice weevil larva eating inside a wheat kernel, a termite cutting a piece of wood, or a grub chewing on a root?"
posted by dhruva on Feb 23, 2005 - 10 comments

Creepy-crawly close-ups

My Tiny Garden. (Note: Flash; via milton.)
posted by misteraitch on Jun 16, 2004 - 5 comments

The Insect Company

The Insect Company: "Over 6,000 listings with more than 1,600 life-size reference photographs."
posted by hama7 on Jun 1, 2003 - 6 comments

tick, tick, tick ...

They're ugly. I mean small and really ugly! And they don't do us any favors at all. We can hold each other's hands, and share support. Our fight against them may lead to knowledge in other battles, but I think its time to go on the offensive. Its time to defang the beastie. (Maybe I should have posted this at Warfilter instead?)
posted by Wulfgar! on May 20, 2003 - 20 comments

Periodical cicadas

Periodical cicadas, the 13-year and 17-year varieties made up of 23 separate broods, sometimes emerge concurrently, as they did in Missouri in 1998. The result of their combined mating calls is a cacaphony. There are many different varieties of calls: those by Magicicada cassini, Magicicada septendecim and Magicicada septendecula are just a few. Brood XXIII is due this year. The prime numbers of the two cycles make it difficult for predators to evolve matching breeding cycles. More cicada links.
posted by TurkeyMustard on Jun 28, 2002 - 26 comments

Page: 1
Posts