482 posts tagged with jazz.
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RIP Yusef Lateef

Today was marked by the passing of the venerable Yusef Lateef. Perhaps best known for his Eastern Sounds, he notably played with the Cannonball Adderly sextet. A largish (89 song) youtube playlist.
posted by juv3nal on Dec 23, 2013 - 29 comments

Christmas music that won't make you want smash the stereo.

Bill Adler's Xmas Jollies 2013, via LAtino USA this year. Christmas music. It is bad. There is no escaping it. This playlist might help. [more inside]
posted by vrakatar on Dec 21, 2013 - 4 comments

The Lady Who Shot Lee Morgan

If You Didn't Know Already Morgan was killed in the early hours of February 19, 1972, at Slug's Saloon, a jazz club in New York City's East Village where his band was performing. Following an altercation between sets, Morgan's common-law wife Helen More (a.k.a. Morgan), shot him. The injuries were not immediately fatal, but the ambulance service was reluctant to go into the neighborhood where the club was located. They took so long to get there that Morgan bled to death. He was 33 years old. According to an eyewitness, Miss More (13 years his senior) walked out of the club just before the last set. She returned and the band was already on stage. Lee was trying to get up there, but was talking with some people. He just started to get up the stage, when she entered and called his name. He turned around and she shot him. She then turned the gun on the club's doorman Ernie Holman, who grabbed her wrist and took the gun away from her. She started to scream, "Baby, what have I done?" and ran to him. She was later committed to a mental institution for some time. Soon after, Helen Morgan returned to her native North Carolina. Reportedly she never spoke publicly of the incident, until she granted an interview a month before her death. She died in Wilmington, NC, from a heart condition, in March 1996. [more inside]
posted by metagnathous on Dec 18, 2013 - 22 comments

Jim Hall (1930-2013)

The jazz guitarist Jim Hall died yesterday. The New York Times reports:
Jim Hall, a jazz guitarist who for more than 50 years was admired by critics, aficionados and especially his fellow musicians for his impeccable technique and the warmth and subtlety of his playing, died on Tuesday at his home in Greenwich Village. He was 83.
[more inside]
posted by John Cohen on Dec 11, 2013 - 28 comments

Next stop is Harlem

The Charles Mingus Sextet featuring Eric Dolphy perform
Take the "A" Train
Live in Norway, April 12, 1964 [more inside]
posted by timshel on Nov 29, 2013 - 23 comments

Let Me Live That Fantasy

A jazz cover of Lourde's "Royals" by Postmodern Jukebox, featuring guest vocalist "Puddles" - Trigger Warning: Real Life Angry Clown Giant Lounge Singer (who's really good, which makes it scarier) [SLYT]
posted by Slap*Happy on Nov 21, 2013 - 42 comments

Jazz covers. Animated.

Animated Jazz Covers. Very cool.
posted by dobbs on Nov 17, 2013 - 9 comments

Calamari a la Mode

On the Lovecraftian Mode - Gord Sellar on why he writes lovecraftian fiction. Elizabeth Bear on the same question. I. N. J. Culbard on adapting Lovecraft.
posted by Artw on Nov 12, 2013 - 22 comments

The Cry of Jazz

"Edward Bland’s 1959 documentary The Cry of Jazz is one of the most remarkable films I’ve ever seen. An early statement of the black nationalism that would become famous in the late 60s, Bland argues in this 30 minute film that only African-Americans have the soul and history to play jazz and that whites need to understand their inferiority in the genre is precisely because of their racist history. It’s an amazing film." -- Apart from articulating a debate that's perhaps as old as jazz itself, The Cry of Jazz also is the earliest recorded appearance of Sun Ra and his Arkestra.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 3, 2013 - 57 comments

"We'd like to do an old number, and it's one of my favorites."

Joe Pass and Ella Fitzgerald play duets in Hannover in October, 1975. Alternate, longer version with better annotations and video quality but also more audio hiss. Fitzgerald, Pass, and a full band at Ronnie Scott's in 1974.
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 23, 2013 - 9 comments

Utah Jazz...er...Hip Hop?

Historically, the state of Utah has had little relation to jazz music, giving the Utah Jazz the title (the team's only title) of the most incongruously named franchise in the world of sports. Would the Utah Hip Hop be more fitting?
posted by jessssse on Oct 16, 2013 - 56 comments

Dad, this one's for you.

This mix was made using only my dad's records. Every one of them an original pressing, stuff he bought when he was about as old as I am now--give or take a decade. My dad never played an instrument really, and my mom always joked that he was actually tone-deaf. But man, what a taste in music--and in his own way, what an ear too. "Plays Pretty Just For You" is a new mix by Dave Harrington of the band Darkside, which has just released its debut album Psychic. Previously
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 14, 2013 - 26 comments

Hellzapoppin' Lindy Hoppin' - the Harlem Congaroos & Slim Gaillard, too

Slim Gaillard & Slam Stewart with The Harlem Congaroos is a clip from Hellzapoppin'.
Just as swingingly and athletically thereafter, The Congaroo Dancers, a Whitey's Lindy Hoppers joint, appeared in Duke Ellington and His Orchestra with the Congaroo Dancers - Hot Chocolate, also know as the Cottontail Soundie.
And, on a side note, Slim Gaillard & His Trio - Chile & Beans O'Vootee and Slim Gaillard & his Orooney Dunkers - Dunkin' Bagels O Voutie Rootie are from Slim Gaillard and his Trio - The Music Album aka O'Voutie O'Rooney. [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Oct 11, 2013 - 8 comments

The Unique Thelonious Monk

Thelonius Monk: Straight, No Chaser (1/10) [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Oct 8, 2013 - 12 comments

Matana Roberts - Coin Coin

Coin Coin Chapter Two: Mississippi Moonchile (full album stream) is the second instalment in Matana Roberts's projected 12 part Coin Coin series of albums, "using the language of acoustic jazz to look at ideas of race, class and gender politics in American society". Coin Coin was the nickname of a totemic figure from African-American history, Marie Thérèse Metoyer – a freed slave who founded a community along the Cane River in Louisiana in the late 18th century where people of colour enjoyed greater freedoms and opportunities than they could in most other places in the South. [more inside]
posted by dng on Oct 2, 2013 - 2 comments

On Charles Mingus

An Argument With Instruments: On Charles Mingus. How a jazz artist’s relationship to black identity gave his music its stormy weather. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Sep 21, 2013 - 9 comments

"I have been mindfucked before, but never with such sweetness" —YouTube

Finnish jazz pianist + beat boxer + guitarist = Iiro Rantala's Shit Catapault. Equal parts hilarious, bouncy, groovy, and unexpectedly moving.
posted by Rory Marinich on Sep 17, 2013 - 18 comments

Some tasty morsels from the 1920s jazz table

Have you heard the music of Tiny Parham? Though not as celebrated a name as some of his early jazz contemporaries like Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong or King Oliver, Tiny's arrangements were inventive, lively and big fun to listen to, and his bands were full of fine players. Here are three slow to medium tempo numbers selected by The Mainspring Press Record Collectors blog that are a good starting point. Then, if you want to get things jumping a little hotter, try Nervous Tension and Sud Buster's Dream. We'll round it out with Tiny's Stomp. Thanks for the music, big man!
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 14, 2013 - 4 comments

"I'll be up like a rose bud, high on the vine."

Though Cy Coleman enjoyed early success as a jazz pianist, the songwriter would eventually make his biggest mark on Broadway with scores for musicals such as "Wildcat" and "Sweet Charity". Before he died in 2004, he had won five Tonys, two Emmys and the lasting admiration of a great many artists. But enough of the balloon juice; get to the music! [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Sep 9, 2013 - 10 comments

“Great art is horseshit, buy tacos.”

I am not really quite sure how to describe the website MELT except to warn you to prepare to be away for a very long time. (NSFW).
Incorporating works of artists (Be sure to scroll down) both surreal and illustration and sculpters and photographers and documentaries and mixtapes and so much more.
Probably the best way to get around is to just click on the various labels.
Happy Travels
posted by adamvasco on Sep 9, 2013 - 7 comments

All That Meat

Somewhere in-between the space-age bachelor pad sounds of Esquivel and the gimmicky novelty of Spike Jonze sits Mel Henke, one of the most overlooked originators of the mid-century lounge sound. While most famous for versions of All That Meat, 77 Sunset Strip, and Pennies From Heaven, his largely instrumental wink-wink-nudge-nudge album La Dolce Henke is considered his masterpiece - The Lively Ones - The Twisters - You're Driving Me Crazy - Woman In Space - Farmer John - Old McDonald Had A Girl - See The USA In Your Chevrolet - Last Night On The Back Porch (Warning, historical sexism, erotic car metaphors)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 8, 2013 - 8 comments

I got rhythm

Henry Hey did it to Bush and Palin. Drewsif Stalin did it to the "Have you ever had a dream?" kid. And now Dan Weiss has done it to auctioneer Ty Thompson. There's music in people's words.
posted by creeky on Sep 3, 2013 - 2 comments

Marian McPartland, 'Piano Jazz' host, has died

Obit page on NPR "Marian McPartland, who gave the world an intimate, insider's perspective on one of the most elusive topics in music — jazz improvisation — died of natural causes Tuesday night at her home in Long Island, N.Y. She was 95." - from the lead of the article
posted by randomkeystrike on Aug 21, 2013 - 66 comments

What is old is new again: Hot Jazz in New York

How a Swath of 20-Somethings Have Tuned In to 1920s Pop. New Hot Jazz Is Warming Up(audio link). Looking to catch some live? Check out the Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governor's Island this weekend, or the New York Hot Jazz Fest on August 25th. [more inside]
posted by fings on Aug 16, 2013 - 63 comments

Dr Buzzard's Original Savannah Band & Kid Creole and the Coconuts Live

Dr.Buzzard's Original Savannah Band - I'll Play The Fool
Dr. Buzzard's Original Savannah Band -- Cherchez la Femme
Then, later, in a guerrilla video to the original recording,
CoATi MuNDi -- Que Pasa / Me No Pop I
then, after that,
Coati Mundi with Kid Creole & The Coconuts - CoatiMundi's Que Pasa/Me No Pop I
Kid Creole & The Coconuts - I'm A Wonderful Thing Baby [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Aug 15, 2013 - 7 comments

Vintage Vice

Oldtime Tales of Drugs, Sex, Liquor and Gambling [NSFW] [more inside]
posted by ursus_comiter on Aug 14, 2013 - 11 comments

Fresh Fruit, Please!

Frisk Frugt is "flipping brilliant" [more inside]
posted by J0 on Aug 11, 2013 - 11 comments

Roll On

Old records wear out, and sheet can't really describe the swing of jazz, ragtime and blues—but a good player piano roll captures the style and rhythm of a live performance and preserves it for generations to come. [more inside]
posted by overeducated_alligator on Aug 11, 2013 - 20 comments

THROUGHOUT

Some jazz sessions are incredible magic. And within those sessions one will occasionally hear a brilliant, cosmic rendition of a gorgeous composition - in this case it's Bill Frisell's gorgeous composition named "Throughout" played by Charlie Haden's Liberation Music Orchestra with Carla Bley, in 2004, at the annual Jazz in Marciac Festival in Marciac, France. [more inside]
posted by Vibrissae on Aug 10, 2013 - 16 comments

George Duke has died

Keyboard legend George Duke, known for his work with Frank Zappa, Billy Cobham, and Stanley Clarke, as well as for many solo projects, has died.
posted by thelonius on Aug 7, 2013 - 22 comments

A Few First Ladies of Jazz and Rhythm 'n Blues

Nellie Lutcher - Blue Skies, It Had to Be You & Let's Fall In Love
Martha Davis & Spouse - That's Life
Dinah Washington with Louis Jordan - What A Difference A Day Made & Makin' Whoopee
Ella Fitzgerald -- It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing
Count Basie & Helen Humes - I Cried for You
Sarah Vaughn -- The Nearness of You
Billie Holiday -- Fine and Mellow
posted by y2karl on Jul 30, 2013 - 13 comments

"People treated it with respect, but didn't particularly enjoy it."

In 1973, The Who released their sixth album, Quadrophenia. The epic double album tells the story of a boy named Jimmy Cooper who deals with mental illness on top of the run-of-the-mill stresses of teen life. But Jimmy Cooper isn't just any London teen.  Jimmy Cooper is a Mod. [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Jul 29, 2013 - 68 comments

Call Me Jazzy

Call Me Maybe, 1920s style (SLYT)
posted by Gelatin on Jul 25, 2013 - 57 comments

D.O.G.

For all those times you spent bored under the merchandise sign at an urban jazz festival, sweating, wrapping your head in striped garments, ripping the soles off your shoes in a primal fury, this man would like to dance for you.
posted by mannequito on Jul 10, 2013 - 11 comments

Two By Five

Steve Reich's 3-movement (Fast, Slow, Fast) somewhat jazzy, somewhat rock-ish 2x5 was composed for 5 musicians and prerecorded tape, or two groups of five musicians. Here is Bang On A Can All-Stars (6 of them, no idea why) performing the piece. [20m] Here is a large group of BOACA-S performing it as a 10-piece ensemble. [21m] [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Jun 18, 2013 - 5 comments

5,000 light years from Birdland, but I'm still preachin' the rhythm

"From the day of it's release in 1977, every time you heard it, you knew 2 things - you had never heard anything like it and this was something special. Energy, sophistication, soul. Birdland." | Weather Report live in 1978 at Stadthalle Offenbach | Maynard Ferguson Big Band live in 1982, Maynard Ferguson Band, live at Disneyland '83 (decent audience recording), Maynard Ferguson Band live on TV (year unknown) and a studio recording of Maynard Ferguson | Bruce Kaphan Quartet recording Birdland in their studio | Manhattan Transfer Vocalies Live in Tokyo in 1986, the same year when Weather Report disbanded | Future Corps, live
posted by filthy light thief on May 31, 2013 - 15 comments

RIP Mulgrew Miller

Jazz pianist Mulgrew Miller is gone too soon at 57. His music lives on, including this streaming NPR recording of the Mulgrew Miller Trio live at the Kennedy Center Jazz Club.
posted by .kobayashi. on May 30, 2013 - 14 comments

Supreme

95 minutes of John Coltrane live in 1960-61-65... with Elvin Jones (drums), Jimmy Garrison (bass) and McCoy Tyner (piano), and Stan Getz, Eric Dolphy, Oscar Peterson.
posted by philip-random on May 29, 2013 - 15 comments

More Belgian/Italian Goodness

Sarah Ferri serves up blues and jazz and other good stuff. A Place on the Moon. The Hungry Villain. Dancing at the Supermarket. And the ear-worm that is On My Own. That is all.
posted by IndigoJones on May 27, 2013 - 2 comments

Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts

Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts: From 1958-1973, composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein (Previously on MeFi) played live, educational concerts with the New York Philharmonic that were televised nationwide on CBS. Tapes of the broadcasts were eventually syndicated to 40 countries, introducing an entire generation of children to a wide range musical concepts, styles and composers. The first concert to air was "What Does Music Mean." [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 16, 2013 - 5 comments

Mop Mop: bastard performances of modern jazz, afro funk, soul music, etc

Andrea Benini is a musician, music producer and composer from Cesena, Italy, and is more commonly known as Mop Mop, or at least the head of a changing group of musicians who use that name. In 2005, collective Mop Mop released an album of cool vibes, spare paino lines, tight grooves (5 sample tracks, streaming on Grooveshark). The group has changed over the years, releasing a total of four albums, with the most recent, Isle of Magic, containing 13 tracks of pure voodoo jazz, Caribbean flavors, Afro-funk, exotic rhythms and soul music. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 10, 2013 - 3 comments

“Music exists in nature to make you smarter."

Bob Brozman, the undisputed master of the National Resonator Guitar, has passed away at age 59. Ethnomusicologist, virtuoso fingerpicker, musical historian, and anarchist philosopher Bob Brozman fell in love with National’s metal body resonator guitars as a teenager and made them his life’s passion. [more inside]
posted by zaelic on Apr 26, 2013 - 34 comments

The CLUB HANGOVER Archive, 1954-58

In the 1950s, Club Hangover was the place to go in San Francisco to hear Dixieland and New Orleans jazz. Thanks to tapes from KCBS being preserved and passed on, you can now listen to 25 complete and unedited half-hour broadcasts from Club Hangover, with recordings of Louis Armstrong, Earl "Fatha" Hines, Kid Ory, Muggsy Spanier, Ralph Sutton, and Jack Teagarden, all from 1954-58.
posted by fings on Apr 25, 2013 - 6 comments

Spirit Voices: Music is the Healing Force

The Black Classical History Of Spiritual Jazz 1955-2012: a 12-hour music mix [via Aquarium Drunkard]
posted by LeLiLo on Apr 14, 2013 - 13 comments

3 examples of great African-American music, with commentary and analysis

Listening Guide to West End Blues by Louis Armstrong - Listening Guide to Backwater Blues by Bessie Smith - Listening Guide to Salt Peanuts by Dizzy Gillespie and His All Stars
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 11, 2013 - 6 comments

A relentless curiosity and desire to move beyond

The World According to John Coltrane is a one-hour documentary, featuring lots of music footage and interviews with prominent jazz musicians such as Wayne Shorter, Tommy Flanagan and many others. It's an excellent primer on the enormously influential saxophonist's life and music.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 6, 2013 - 12 comments

What the Third Stream Isn't

In 1957 composer, conductor, and sideman Gunther Schuller defined the Third Stream as "a new genre of music located about halfway between jazz and classical music." He also defined what it was not. [more inside]
posted by timsteil on Apr 5, 2013 - 23 comments

The legendary giant of free jazz

My Name Is Albert Ayler.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 1, 2013 - 19 comments

Nas' Illmatic, redone by Funky DL as Jazzmatic

British hip-hop producer/rapper Funky DL has a freebie for you: Jazzmatic, Nas' Illmatic redone as a jazz album from the late 1930s.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 30, 2013 - 15 comments

Goodnight, Bebo

Bebo Valdes has passed away. A giant of Cuban music, he was a "big man whose music revealed a huge heart." He famously worked with Nat King Cole, and also handed down his musical chops to son Chucho, who would become one of the founding members of the band Irakere. There are some videos inside the fold to allow us to celebrate Bebo and his music. [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Mar 22, 2013 - 11 comments

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