440 posts tagged with jazz. (View popular tags)
Displaying 51 through 100 of 440. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (264)
+ (35)
+ (29)
+ (26)
+ (25)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (22)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (7)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (6)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)
+ (5)


Users that often use this tag:
y2karl (22)
flapjax at midnite (17)
filthy light thief (14)
Trurl (10)
kenko (8)
Joe Beese (7)
nicolin (7)
Kattullus (7)
Miko (6)
madamjujujive (6)
bluedaniel (5)
MiguelCardoso (5)
sleepy pete (5)
Seekerofsplendor (4)
growabrain (4)
languagehat (4)
jonp72 (3)
timsteil (3)
netbros (3)
semmi (3)
safetyfork (3)
fings (3)
klangklangston (3)
beelzbubba (3)
progosk (3)
miss lynnster (3)
Lutoslawski (3)
ornate insect (3)
overeducated_allig... (3)
not_on_display (3)
Going To Maine (2)
MartinWisse (2)
The Emperor of Ice... (2)
puny human (2)
Rory Marinich (2)
hippybear (2)
idiopath (2)
philip-random (2)
mannequito (2)
Rhaomi (2)
St Urbain's Horseman (2)
louche mustachio (2)
motty (2)
shakespeherian (2)
snsranch (2)
rossination (2)
gman (2)
Artw (2)
paulsc (2)
IndigoJones (2)
nola (2)
zarq (2)
box (2)
.kobayashi. (2)
plep (2)
crunchland (2)
Smart Dalek (2)
LinusMines (2)
dobbs (2)
carsonb (2)

The CLUB HANGOVER Archive, 1954-58

In the 1950s, Club Hangover was the place to go in San Francisco to hear Dixieland and New Orleans jazz. Thanks to tapes from KCBS being preserved and passed on, you can now listen to 25 complete and unedited half-hour broadcasts from Club Hangover, with recordings of Louis Armstrong, Earl "Fatha" Hines, Kid Ory, Muggsy Spanier, Ralph Sutton, and Jack Teagarden, all from 1954-58.
posted by fings on Apr 25, 2013 - 6 comments

 

Spirit Voices: Music is the Healing Force

The Black Classical History Of Spiritual Jazz 1955-2012: a 12-hour music mix [via Aquarium Drunkard]
posted by LeLiLo on Apr 14, 2013 - 13 comments

3 examples of great African-American music, with commentary and analysis

Listening Guide to West End Blues by Louis Armstrong - Listening Guide to Backwater Blues by Bessie Smith - Listening Guide to Salt Peanuts by Dizzy Gillespie and His All Stars
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 11, 2013 - 6 comments

A relentless curiosity and desire to move beyond

The World According to John Coltrane is a one-hour documentary, featuring lots of music footage and interviews with prominent jazz musicians such as Wayne Shorter, Tommy Flanagan and many others. It's an excellent primer on the enormously influential saxophonist's life and music.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 6, 2013 - 12 comments

What the Third Stream Isn't

In 1957 composer, conductor, and sideman Gunther Schuller defined the Third Stream as "a new genre of music located about halfway between jazz and classical music." He also defined what it was not. [more inside]
posted by timsteil on Apr 5, 2013 - 23 comments

The legendary giant of free jazz

My Name Is Albert Ayler.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 1, 2013 - 19 comments

Nas' Illmatic, redone by Funky DL as Jazzmatic

British hip-hop producer/rapper Funky DL has a freebie for you: Jazzmatic, Nas' Illmatic redone as a jazz album from the late 1930s.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 30, 2013 - 15 comments

Goodnight, Bebo

Bebo Valdes has passed away. A giant of Cuban music, he was a "big man whose music revealed a huge heart." He famously worked with Nat King Cole, and also handed down his musical chops to son Chucho, who would become one of the founding members of the band Irakere. There are some videos inside the fold to allow us to celebrate Bebo and his music. [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Mar 22, 2013 - 11 comments

Try Not To Think Of Christopher Cross

While best remembered for his starring role in a horrible movie, once upon a time, the man had some chops. A surprising mix of world-tinged fusion and straight ahead jazz from 1969, I give you:

"The Dudley Moore Trio"
posted by timsteil on Mar 21, 2013 - 52 comments

Got a Match? No, but I've got 2 arms, 2 necks, 2 sticks and 88 keys

Chick Corea Elektric Band's Got a Match? played by one person
posted by klausman on Mar 14, 2013 - 10 comments

Jazz that nobody asked for, an animated short film

Sometimes you want to be somber, or serious, or just enjoy some peace and quiet. And in some of those instances, you get jazz that nobody asked for. Jazz that just won't die. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 11, 2013 - 9 comments

Do Not Hit Snooze

Inspired by the sound of an alarm clock going off, Hiromi, Anthony Jackson and Simon Phillips perform Hiromi's composition Move.
posted by Lutoslawski on Mar 11, 2013 - 21 comments

L'Ecume Des Jours

Trailer for Michel Gondry's new film, Mood Indigo, based on the book Foam of the Daze (or Froth on the Daydream, depending on the translation) by Boris Vian. [more inside]
posted by hopeless romantique on Feb 25, 2013 - 18 comments

"I'll steal it from this very earth."

A timeline of Blue Note jazz album covers.
posted by dobbs on Feb 25, 2013 - 36 comments

The Flute was Blowing Smoke Rings

Claude Bolling and Jean-Pierre Rampal: Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano Trio slyt
posted by boots on Feb 16, 2013 - 11 comments

Donald Byrd December 9, 1932 – February 4, 2013

"One day, in the early 1960's, Mongo Santamaria called up Herbie Hancock and asked him to sit in as a pianist with Mongo's band, which was then performing at Club Cubano InterAmericano on Prospect Avenue, a popular Latin music spot. Herbie was reluctant to do it because he never played Latin before, but accepted the offer and was doing pretty well by the end of the first set. Then during intermission, Donald Byrd, who was there, asked Herbie to play his original composition "Watermelon Man" for Mongo. When Herbie started doing this, Mongo's band, especially his huge percussion section, started joining in, and before you knew it the whole club was dancing. Mongo was so excited by what happened that he asked if he could record the song. He did, and it became his greatest hit." [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 11, 2013 - 26 comments

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to violence."

Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! - a look at Russ Meyer's finest film. (possibly NSFW)
posted by Artw on Feb 10, 2013 - 16 comments

Try repeating it out loud: VIL-lage VAN-guard, VIL-lage VAN-guard.

Village Vanguard. For 70 years, that alliterative name has swung in 4/4 time, marking the center of the known jazz universe to an international circle of musicians and music fans. Since late 2008, NPR Music has been streaming monthly jazz concerts in their Live at the Village Vanguard series. [more inside]
posted by .kobayashi. on Feb 1, 2013 - 8 comments

Joey Baron / Live Beeroth x 2 in 1999 / Two solo performances

The Masada track Beeroth with gusto live at Tonic 1999 and with duende at Warsaw Summer Jazz Days 1999 features Mr. Joey Baron. Perhaps Masada's Beeroth is not your thing but you are curious about how Mr. Baron might sound all on his own? Here is a solo at Mózg and on Roulette TV.
posted by safetyfork on Jan 19, 2013 - 7 comments

Soundtracks for 2013

High quality ecletic mixtapes by Luanda Baldijão. Lounge, jazz & rare finds.
posted by Tom-B on Jan 17, 2013 - 6 comments

'Jazz On A Summer's Day' - a film by Bert Stern

Keith Richards saw it fourteen times, albeit not for it all, which is what you get here:
Jazz On A Summer's Day [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Jan 9, 2013 - 8 comments

"the arts are just a part of the weapons of life"

The poet Jayne Cortez passed away this past December 28th in New York City (New York Times obituary). She started publishing her poems in the late 1960s and in the 70s began performing her poetry backed by music, first in collaboration with bassist Richard Davis, and then backed by her own band The Firespitters. Some of their tracks have found their way to YouTube: I See Chano Pozo, If the Drum Is a Woman, There It Is, Maintain Control & Economic Love Song I, Everybody Wants to Be Somebody, Takin' the Blues Back Home, Talk to Me (for Don Cherry), I've Been Searching, You Can Be and Endangered Species List Blues. Just two years ago she performed solo with her son by Ornette Coleman, drummer Denardo Coleman: Find Your Own Voice, I'm Gonna Shake and She Got He Got. In 1997 she was featured on University of California television network in the series Artists on the Cutting Edge where she read poems and discussed her work. Finally, here's a brief clip from the 1982 documentary Poetry in Motion, where she was interviewed.
posted by Kattullus on Jan 5, 2013 - 4 comments

Anthony Braxton: Bootlegs

Anthony Braxton offers bootlegs of his shows at his Tricentric Foundation website. We offer many bootlegs for free. 13 bootleg albums are added at a time and the newest batch is always available to the public.
He also offers a subscription plan for his record label, and a huge trove of his writings, among other things. (via this appreciation at The Awl)
posted by OmieWise on Jan 3, 2013 - 11 comments

Far Clouds In Stately Formation

The New John Handy Quintet · Naima

Dave Holland Quartet · Conference Of The Birds

John Abercrombie, Jan Hammer, Jack DeJohnette · Timeless

Rob Wasserman, Stephane Grappelli · Over the Rainbow
posted by y2karl on Jan 2, 2013 - 15 comments

Ry Cooder and the Moula Banda Rhythm Aces - Let's Have A Ball, a film by Les Blanks

Ry Cooder and the Moula Banda Rhythm Aces - Let's Have A Ball, a film by Les Blanks
This is the complete show from the Catalyst in Santa Cruz in March 1987.   Via The Iwebender Channel

Love that Maria Elena.... [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Dec 9, 2012 - 10 comments

RIP Jazz master Dave Brubeck.

I am devastated to read that jazz master and Kennedy Center honoree Dave Brubeck has died. His influence on jazz was wide and profound. His frequent collaborator and the composer of one of the Dave Brubeck Quartet’s best known tunes, “Take Five,” Paul Desmond, said of the sound of his alto sax, “"I think I had it in the back of my mind that I wanted to sound like a dry martini." Brubeck was well-known for his use of differing time signatures, again referencing “Take Five” which was in 5/4 time and another example, “Blue Rondo a la Turk,” in 9/8 time. Desmond passed away in 2005, and Brubeck has left the earthly plain to join him in the Heavenly Jazz Band. RIP. (MLYT)
posted by Lynsey on Dec 5, 2012 - 182 comments

Ibrahim Maalouf, jazz trumpeter and composer

"Before playing he explained the story behind the song, which was a journey – it was in 1993 as a 12 year old that he was able to return to Beirut alone for the first time (his parents having fled to Paris during the war) and he wandered the streets with his walkman, earphones plugged but playing no music, instead composing music in his mind and looking at the bullet marks in the walls of homes which had been rebuilt so many times over during the war that not much of the devastation was actually visible.. but after walking for a while, he sat and rested for some time.. and then suddenly when he got up again he noticed a street in front of him completely devastated and abandoned – something that he had actually been looking to see – but in that moment he was listening to (having just discovered) Led Zepplin and the combination of seeing the devastation and the music actually scared him and he ran away. And so this song tells that journey." The song is Beirut, and he is Ibrahim Maalouf. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 22, 2012 - 14 comments

RIP Austin Peralta

Jazz prodigy Austin Peralta has died. Announcement and links to his music at Brainfeeder. Peralta contributed to Flying Lotus' recent album Until the Quiet comes; on Twitter this morning Flying Lotus wrote "it kills me to type that we lost a member of our family, Austin Peralta. I don't really have the right words right now." From Fact: "In his tragically short life, the California native had proved himself to be a fearsome and precocious talent. At 15 years old, Peralta was already touring the world with his own trio, and performing alongside legends like Chick Corea and Omar Hakim. Whilst still at high school, Peralta headed up ensembles featuring luminaries like Ron Carter and Buster Williams. He also released two LPs (2006′s Maiden Voyage and Mantra) in Japan before the age of 16." His entry on Wikipedia. Tribute from Frank Ocean.
posted by jokeefe on Nov 22, 2012 - 12 comments

“Anything you are shows up in your music …”

“Her early records are collectors’ items. Her writing and playing have become part of the pattern of jazz history. She has transcended the difficulties experienced by women in the music field and through several decades has held a position of eminence as one of jazz’s most original and creative pianists. She speaks softly: ‘Anything you are shows up in your music—jazz is whatever you are playing yourself, being yourself, letting your thoughts come through.’” Mary Lou Williams: Into The Sun, a conversational profile by fellow pianist Marian McPartland, 1964. [more inside]
posted by koeselitz on Nov 16, 2012 - 6 comments

Three Drops of Water, One Grain of Sand

His amazing music, ranging from haunting to groovy to velvety smooth, went barely noticed for most of his life. So it's oddly fitting that his death would pass barely noticed, too. Terry Callier died in Chicago last Saturday at age 67. [more inside]
posted by Hairy Lobster on Nov 1, 2012 - 22 comments

"I close my eyes and dream about a sunny holiday ... "

Caro Emerald is a Dutch jazz singer. Her debut album "Deleted Scenes From The Cutting Room Floor" went sextuple-platinum in The Netherlands, and has the longest run at #1 on the Dutch charts. BBC Music reviews. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 31, 2012 - 16 comments

A start, anyway.

Ten Jazz Albums to Listen to Before You Die. [more inside]
posted by zardoz on Oct 30, 2012 - 120 comments

Dorothy Dandridge - A Zoot Suit and other soundies

Dorothy Dandridge - A Zoot Suit
Dorothy Dandridge - Cow Cow Boogie
Dorothy Dandridge, the Nicholas Brothers & Glenn Miller - Chattanooga Choo Choo
Hoagy Carmichael - Lazybones
A very young and very beautiful Dorothy Dandridge, exploding with talent and charisma... [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Oct 26, 2012 - 12 comments

Go See the World

Jazz saxophonist David S. Ware passed away yesterday at age 62. [more inside]
posted by box on Oct 19, 2012 - 18 comments

Microbial Bebop

When looking for inspiration, most songwriters to go well-used emotional wells – triumph or loss, love or heartbreak. But Peter Larsen, a biologist at Argonne National Laboratory, looked to the microbes of the English Channel. He used seven years’ worth of genetic and environmental data, converting geochemical and microbial abundance measurements into notes, beats, and chords.
posted by Egg Shen on Oct 8, 2012 - 13 comments

Who loves ya? Scott Bradlee, apparently.

Scott Bradlee is probably best known around the internet for his ragtime reinterpretation of classic 80's hits (previously), but that's certainly not the only thing he's done. There are the relatively straighter covers, for example. And then there's the other stuff. [more inside]
posted by KChasm on Sep 22, 2012 - 6 comments

My name is GRiZ

GRiZ - Mad Liberation. Take a 21 year old bedroom producer from Michigan, raise them on the the internet with a near complete access to the history of modern music with a focus on electronic/dance and apparently you get this incredibly humanistic and cross-cultural album that's both homage, monument and appropriation of hundreds of influences in modern music in an incredibly dubby dubstep framework. (Free album download here.)
posted by loquacious on Sep 5, 2012 - 67 comments

A Problem in Emotionally Applied Semantics

The Billy Taylor Trio, live at Storyville. In 1951 legendary bass player Charles Mingus sat in with the Billy Taylor trio for a live broadcast. Here is thirty minutes of the broadcast. [more inside]
posted by Gygesringtone on Jul 29, 2012 - 8 comments

Esbjorn Svensson Trio

In this self-aware, soulful music I found everything I was looking for - and it frequently moved me to tears. It has been four years since the tragic passing of Swedish "jazz" pianist Esbjorn Svensson. [more inside]
posted by incandissonance on Jul 19, 2012 - 9 comments

On The Sublime - Louis Armstrong, and Ella Fitzgerald and Oscar Peterson

Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson - You Go To My Head

Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson - How Long Has This Been Going On ?

Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson - I Get A Kick Out of You

Three songs from one of the most sublime sessions ever recorded... [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Jul 18, 2012 - 14 comments

Kind of Review

Miles Davis does a blind listening test, identifying and rating other jazz musicians.
posted by grouse on Jul 17, 2012 - 41 comments

Via Route 66, comes My Sweet Embraceable Moonlit in Vermont Lorraine by the King Cole Trio & Others

Nat King Cole Trio - Sweet Lorraine
Nat King Cole Trio - Route 66
Nat King Cole Trio - Embraceable You
Nat King Cole Trio - Moonlight in Vermont
Nat King Cole with Coleman Hawkins & the Oscar Peterson Trio - Sweet Lorraine
posted by y2karl on Jul 3, 2012 - 15 comments

Can't stand no...

I put a spell on you: a dramatic lip reading (SLYT).
posted by es_de_bah on Jul 1, 2012 - 32 comments

Rare songbirds of the world.

The changing prominence of the contralto. While female contralto pop and jazz singers can be heard on just about every i-device and radio station in the United States and Europe, their classical counterparts are increasingly rare in today's opera, concert, and radio programming. [more inside]
posted by Currer Belfry on Jun 23, 2012 - 13 comments

My Old Man - The Five Spirits of Rhythm 2012 Mayan Apocalypse Father's Day Edition

My Old Man - The Spirits of Rhythm [more inside]
posted by y2karl on Jun 17, 2012 - 11 comments

Sing us a Song to Keep us Warm, There's Such a Chill

In the wake of their grunge-y breakout hit "Creep" and the success of sophomore record The Bends, Thom Yorke and the rest of Radiohead were under pressure to deliver once more. So they shut themselves away inside the echoing halls of a secluded 16th century manor and got to work. What emerged from that crumbling Elizabethan castle fifteen years ago today was a shockingly ambitious masterpiece of progressive rock, a visionary concept album that explored the "fridge buzz" of modernity -- alienation, social disconnection, existential dread, the impersonal hum of technology -- through a mosaic of challenging, innovative, eerily beautiful music unlike anything else at the time. Tentatively called Ones and Zeroes, then Your Home May Be at Risk If You Do Not Keep Up Payments, the band finally settled on OK Computer, an appropriately enigmatic title for this acclaimed harbinger of millennial angst. For more, you can watch the retrospective OK Computer: A Classic Album Under Review for a track-by-track rundown, or the unsettling documentary Meeting People is Easy for a look at how the album's whirlwind tour nearly gave Yorke a nervous breakdown. Or look inside for more details and cool interpretations of all the tracks -- including an upcoming MeFi Music Challenge! [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 16, 2012 - 66 comments

Pete Cosey (October 9, 1943 – May 30, 2012)

Pete Cosey dead at 68. Though he had a career as a session guitarist prior to and had some important appearances after, Cosey is most well known for his brief time playing with Miles Davis (1973 - 1975) during an era of Miles' that has at times confounded critics*. Cosey appeared on Get Up with It, Dark Magus, Agharta and Pangaea with Miles. [more inside]
posted by safetyfork on Jun 3, 2012 - 14 comments

Revisioning Red Riding Hood

Animation veteran Steve Moore recently posted a short from the archives of Disney TV Animation, written by Dan O’Shannon, narrated by Garrison Keillor, and voiced by Mia Farrow, Michael Richards, June Foray, and Adam West, all set to a jazz soundtrack. Take 15 minutes and watch Redux Riding Hood. Steve tells the story of the short on his blog. (Via Cartoon Brew)
posted by filthy light thief on May 22, 2012 - 8 comments

Godwin meets Glenn Miller

So-called jazz compositions may contain at most 10% syncopation; the remainder must consist of a natural legato movement devoid of the hysterical rhythmic reverses characteristic of the barbarian races and conductive to dark instincts alien to the German people (so-called riffs)
The story of Nazi jazz. [Previously.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on May 19, 2012 - 42 comments

Eric Dolphy

Eric Dolphy [auto-music] was a true original with his own distinctive styles on alto, flute, and bass clarinet. His music fell into the "avant-garde" category yet he did not discard chordal improvisation altogether (although the relationship of his notes to the chords was often pretty abstract). While most of the other "free jazz" players sounded very serious in their playing, Dolphy's solos often came across as ecstatic and exuberant. His improvisations utilized very wide intervals, a variety of nonmusical speechlike sounds, and its own logic. Although the alto was his main axe, Dolphy was the first flutist to move beyond bop (influencing James Newton) and he largely introduced the bass clarinet to jazz as a solo instrument. He was also one of the first (after Coleman Hawkins) to record unaccompanied horn solos, preceding Anthony Braxton by five years. - AllMusic (previously: 1, 2)
posted by Trurl on Apr 21, 2012 - 18 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 9