6 posts tagged with lareviewofbooks.
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Anne spelt with an "e"

A new adaptation of Anne of Green Gables is in the works. Not everybody is convinced this is a great idea. Megan Follows's Anne Shirley will be hard to top—she had the part nailed from the time she auditioned.
posted by Sokka shot first on Jan 16, 2016 - 52 comments

Is this some snobby, elitist, aesthetic thing?

Unlike Schulz, Watterson was unable to reconcile his creative ambitions with the lucrative opportunities that success had opened up. He was every bit Schulz’s artistic heir, but he had little interest in inheriting the fertile commercial landscape that Schulz had so carefully cultivated. Twenty-five years later, their disagreements come across as equal parts quaint and timely — a remnant from the last era when newspaper cartoonists commanded widespread readerships and profitable product lines, and an ageless meditation on what selling out and authenticity mean in a commercial art form. -- Luke Epplin in the LA Review of Books on Bill Watterson, "failed revolutionary".
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 19, 2015 - 93 comments

It was the spinsters who made me.

"Historically, spinsterhood has meant a kind of radical unavailability to straight men, implying either rejection of them or rejection by them or both. This sought or unsought rejection has the potential to be experienced by women as a source of strength. It can mean making the choice not just to set your own terms on the marriage or meat market, but to opt out of the market altogether." [Briallen Hopper for LA Review of Books: On Spinsters.] [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Jul 15, 2015 - 8 comments


Are paper books becoming obsolete in the digital age, or poised to lead a new cultural renaissance? [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 3, 2013 - 31 comments

'he watched bodies floating outside the city walls ... much as the deforested trees floated down from Lebanon.'

Ross Andersen interviews Robert Pogue Harrison in the LA Review of Books: Deforestation in a Civilized World: ' In my reading of it, the epic stands for the angst or dread we have within the walls of civilization, and the hero Gilgamesh embodies that angst in many ways. In fact, Gilgamesh's first antagonist is the forest; he sets out to slay the forest demon Humbaba, the poetic stand-in for the cedar forests of faraway lands.' [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 26, 2012 - 3 comments

"In Breaking Bad the villain is not sociology, but a human being; what destroys the mortals is not a system, but a fellow mortal."

In Hell, "We Shall Be Free": On 'Breaking Bad' by Michelle Kuo and Albert Wu [Contains Spoilers]
posted by Fizz on Jul 13, 2012 - 72 comments

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