Join 3,558 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

60 posts tagged with legend. (View popular tags)
Displaying 1 through 50 of 60. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (8)
+ (6)
+ (5)


Users that often use this tag:
Miko (3)
The Whelk (2)
crossoverman (2)
adamvasco (2)

the inspiration for this version of Robin Hood isn’t actually Robin Hood

Disney’s Robin Hood: A Bit More Medieval Than You Might Think [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 20, 2014 - 25 comments

Rose Rose I Love You

In 1952 Malaya, cabaret dancer Rose Chan's bra snapped on stage. Noticing the enthusiastic response from the audience, she decided to capitalise on this, and transformed herself into Malaysia's first (and so far only) Queen of Striptease. (Many of these links have NSFW pictures) [more inside]
posted by divabat on Apr 18, 2014 - 13 comments

You bring the Ouija board, I'll bring the spirits...

The infamous, sprawling Winchester Mystery House has plans to allow overnight stays and full onsite alcohol consumption
posted by The Whelk on Mar 16, 2014 - 46 comments

China reaches for the Moon

This Saturday, the Jade Rabbit will meet with Chang’e when China attempts its first landing of an unmanned spacecraft on the Moon. [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Dec 13, 2013 - 66 comments

And there's a creepy doll, that always follows you

Amongst the canals of Lake Xochimilco, south of Mexico City, there are artificial islands called chinampas. Chinampas were invented by the Aztecs as a way to increase agricultural production, and while most have been converted for residential or commercial use, there is one that stands apart: Isla de las Munecas (The Island of the Dolls). Home to hundreds of terrifying, mutilated dolls, their severed limbs, decapitated heads, and blank eyes adorn trees, fences, and nearly every available surface. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 17, 2013 - 42 comments

Those silly Dutch errr Germans, losing things...

The Lost Dutchman Mine remains lost, though the body of a man obsessed by it was finally found. Jesse Capen was obsessed by the legend of the Lost Dutchman Mine, and planned a trip to the Superstition Mountains in 2009 to find it and earn his riches. Unfortunately he died in an apparent fall on what was probably his first day there. His remains were finally found.
posted by Eekacat on Jan 5, 2013 - 14 comments

Ancient Fears: The Return of the Flood Saga

"The word reclaim came up more than once to describe the rising tide. It is a revealing word, more narrative than simply descriptive: it hints at some larger backstory, some plot twist in a longer saga about our claims and the water’s counterclaims to the earth.… This story was already ancient when it was adapted for the biblical text—which is to say, it records a very old fear. Like all old fears, it has the uncanny feel of a vivid memory. It may be a memory of an actual flood in an actual Sumerian city, Shurrupal, ca 2800 B.C.E. In fact, it may be even older than that."
posted by the mad poster! on Nov 13, 2012 - 21 comments

Don't Tell Him Pike

Actor Clive Dunn, best known for his role as Lance Corporal "Jonesy" Jones in Dad's Army, has died aged 92. A veteran comedy actor, Dunn was famous in the UK for his signature appearance in Dad's Army. Thanks to the BBC and endless repeats, he became well known outside the UK for his portrayal of the doddering Lance Corporal pressed back into service to defend Walmington-on-sea from an impending German invasion during WW2. The Home Guard based comedy had a large fan base.

There are a wide range of clips of his performances on the internet. Don't miss the Dad's Army movie which showed Dunn in his element.

Dunn was well known before he even set foot on the Dad's Army set from his work in the classic comedy series Hancock's Half Hour and The Tony Hancock Show. We also shouldn't forget his time as a pop star or a potato loving alien. But most importantly, don't panic.

Previously.
posted by arcticseal on Nov 7, 2012 - 23 comments

Still nothing nearly as awful as eyeball leeches.

11 Legendary Monsters of Asia. 10 Legendary Monsters of Europe. 7 Legendary Monsters of South America. 10 Legendary Monsters of Australasia and Antarctica. 11 Legendary Monsters of Africa. 10 Legendary Monsters of North America Part 1, Part 2.
posted by davidjmcgee on Nov 1, 2012 - 18 comments

The Use Of Aslan Or Morpheus Is Cheating

Tor.com asks: So Who Would Make Up The Epic Fantasy Version Of The Avengers?
posted by The Whelk on May 10, 2012 - 169 comments

The Ballad of Mike Haggar

This is the Ballad of Mike Haggar (SLYT) via [more inside]
posted by EatTheWeak on Aug 4, 2011 - 6 comments

I miss, I miss, I miss, I make

Severiano Ballesteros, golf legend, has passed away at 54. If you could say anything about his game, was that he could win a British Open from the car park.
posted by valdesm on May 7, 2011 - 26 comments

RIP you Diamond Geezer

It was Enery's Ammer wot put a young Cassius Clay on the floor (3.02) in 1963. Sir Henry Cooper, British Boxing legend has died aged 76.
The splitting glove controvery was a a mischievous manipulation of the truth (scroll down previous link)
He is still the only boxer to have won three Londsdale belts. Cooper and Muhammed Ali remained friends throughout his life.
In later years he came to despise what he saw as tawdry dealings and gave up commentating on BBC radio dedicating his life to golf and charity.
posted by adamvasco on May 2, 2011 - 19 comments

Oh Cancer, Up Yours

"I said that I wasn't a sex symbol and that if anybody tried to make me one I'd shave my head tomorrow". The rumors have been swirling all day, but sadly appear to be confirmed - Marianne Joan Elliot-Said aka punk legend Poly Styrene has passed away after battling breast cancer. Her new album , Generation Indigo is scheduled to be released today. [more inside]
posted by louche mustachio on Apr 26, 2011 - 100 comments

Brierized.

For your listening pleasure, I present to you the Zelda Rag, performed (with no prior practice) by Tom Brier. When that gets old, there's also a ragtime adaptation of the horse race theme from the Ocarina of Time that is not to be missed. And if Zelda's too easy, you can try the theme from Ghosts and Goblins. And, finally, an actual rag from Final Fantasy VI: the Spinach Rag. [more inside]
posted by kaibutsu on Dec 26, 2010 - 22 comments

Yesterday's Faces Today

How They Look Now is a LJ community with one focus: finding more current pictures of past stars, from that kid in those 1980s Moody Blues videos (who went on to star on stage and screen), to the diverse cast of Legend (1985 trailer).
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 10, 2010 - 10 comments

We don't need Jodie, we've got Hopkins!

He's Now in the Great Screening Room in the Sky Dino de Laurentiis has passed on, aged 91. Over 150 films produced. He gave this young guy a second chance after this bomb. One of his movies had the best Haniball Lektor/Lector ever. He worked with Fellini, Pacinio, Redford, Schwarzenegger, Bridges, (Jeff), Raimi, and Fonda, (Jane). Goodnight, sweet prince of cinema.
posted by jettloe on Nov 11, 2010 - 53 comments

Rain falls on Uluru

Rain is falling on Australia's big red heart. [more inside]
posted by ninazer0 on Oct 23, 2010 - 56 comments

Some like a defiant one.

Tony Curtis, Hollywood Legend, Navy Man, star of The Defiant Ones, Some Like It Hot and The Great Race, has passed away. [more inside]
posted by crossoverman on Sep 30, 2010 - 76 comments

You'll Be Missed, Ms. Lincoln

Not just a singer, but a songwriter. Not just an actress, but an activist. Abbey Lincoln helped to push the expectations that the jazz loving public had of jazz vocalists beyond the stereotype of sexy chanteuse delivering someone else's lyrics. From sexy and sultry (as in this clip from "The Girl Can't Help It") to quirky and passionate to elegant and expressive, Ms. Lincoln was a true original in every sense of the word. [more inside]
posted by jeanmari on Aug 14, 2010 - 21 comments

A "Living History Book"

Daniel Schorr is dead at 93. Schorr began a career in journalism which spanned more than six decades at 12 years old, when he wrote a story for the Bronx Home News about a suicide. A woman had jumped from the roof of his building, he phoned the police and then wrote and article about the event, for which he was paid $5. After serving in military intelligence during World War II, he worked as a foreign correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and the New York Times before joining CBS in 1953 as one of the legendary "Murrow Boys". [more inside]
posted by rollbiz on Jul 23, 2010 - 146 comments

Wearing shorts and no shirt, with newspaper he walked.

RIP Walking Man of Silver Lake If you've spent a certain amount of time in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, chances are that you noticed the Walking Man. Or perhaps one of the two murals he appears in along Sunset Blvd. [more inside]
posted by mandymanwasregistered on Jul 22, 2010 - 37 comments

Not raoulmoatley funny

Raoul Moat left prison, shot several people and hid from the police for a week before shooting himself. Not long after, the Facebook group 'RIP Raoul Moat You Legend' was set up to predictable outrage and condemnation from the UK Prime Minister (and then condemnation of his reaction.) An astounding radio interview with said group's founder. [more inside]
posted by mippy on Jul 16, 2010 - 136 comments

The Devil's Pool

The Babinda Boulders is a beautiful and exciting place in far-northern Queensland, Australia. It also conceals the Devil's Pool, which is traditionally believed to be haunted by a young Aboriginal girl calling for her lost lover. At least sixteen young men have drowned there since 1959. [more inside]
posted by Joe in Australia on Jul 14, 2010 - 18 comments

Loooooong Gone

Ernie Harwell, long time voice of the Detroit Tigers and previously the Baltimore Orioles, has died at age 92. Previously here. MLB's commissioner's statement.
posted by JoeXIII007 on May 4, 2010 - 50 comments

"He was the worst guy I’ve ever seen trying to hustle women."

Lakers beat writer obliterates the myth that Wilt Chamberlain slept with 20,000 women. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Feb 23, 2010 - 77 comments

Well (s)he did wear a dress....

Pope Joan aka La Papessa is the second card of the major arcana in the Tarot. However there were pre tarot images of a female pope. It's a myth that won't go away. There is sometimes historical truth behind legend. The Cathoic Church relegates everything to fable; especially with a film around the corner. Some more thoughts on the facts behind the legend.
posted by adamvasco on Dec 8, 2009 - 50 comments

Ozmapolitan

Somewhere, over the rainbow, way up high,
There's a land that I heard of once in a lullaby.

The MGM musical version of L. Frank Baum's 1900 children's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz turned 70 this week. It wasn't the first time it was a movie, nor the last time it was a movie or a movie musical. [more inside]
posted by crossoverman on Aug 28, 2009 - 53 comments

Football legend Sir Bobby Robson dies

Football legend Sir Bobby Robson dies, following a long battle with cancer. Further tributes via the Guardian. Donate to his foundation via here.
posted by Webbster on Jul 31, 2009 - 25 comments

Goodbye, Mr. Han Man!

You probably knew him as the evil drug kingpin, Mr. Han in Enter the Dragon. In Hong Kong he was an action movie legend. Sadly, the amazing Shek Kin, a true martial artist, is dead at 96.
posted by bwg on Jun 4, 2009 - 15 comments

Don't Throw The Blues On Me So Strong

The extraordinary T-Bone Walker was born this day in 1910. Previously
posted by chuckdarwin on May 28, 2009 - 7 comments

Chiseled in Stone

"The ability to convey the depths of despair, the heights of jubilation and the serenity of an abiding faith are all that is required to be known as “The Voice.” Unfortunately, very few possess the ability to do all that and what’s more unfortunate, we lost one of those few–possibly the best of those few–with the death of Vern Gosdin at the age of 74." [more inside]
posted by dawson on Apr 29, 2009 - 7 comments

Snooks' Soul Train pulls out of Nawlins

Snooks Eaglin has died. One of New Orleans' most authentic and underrated guitar players won't be making his jazz fest gig this year. Next time you have some red beans & rice, take a moment to remember the guy who some called the human jukebox.
posted by msconduct on Feb 18, 2009 - 23 comments

Ron Asheton, R.I.P.

Ron Asheton, influential guitarist and bassist for The Stooges and Destroy All Monsters, has passed away at age 60.
posted by Dr-Baa on Jan 6, 2009 - 58 comments

It's a bird, it's a plane... its su... wait, nope not him.

Here's Razorhawk a superhero who also wrestles and makes suits for other superheroes. This is Master Legend who recently had an article published in Rolling Stone about him. Meet Superhero who patrols the streets of Clearwater, Florida in his custom Corvette. They call themselves real-life superheroes. A documentary film featuring them has the first 10 minutes free online at google video. [more inside]
posted by flipyourwig on Dec 31, 2008 - 17 comments

"[They] had no idea what LSD was other than what they seen on TV with the hippies"

Dock Ellis, an American baseball pitcherprev, won more games for the champion 1971 Pittsburgh Pirates than anyone else that year. Of course, he was under the influence of the performance-enhancing drug known as LSD on at least one no-hit occasion. Ellis died yesterday at the age of 63. [more inside]
posted by item on Dec 20, 2008 - 68 comments

Van Halen's "No brown M&Ms" concert rider found.

The stuff of legend, Van Halen's "No brown M&Ms" concert rider (most recently mentioned on MetaFilter here) has made the rounds by word of mouth, and word of internet, for years. Now, the Van Halen 1982 World Tour backstage rider has been found. It consists of 53 typewritten pages and contains the M&Ms prohibition - which actually says M & M's (WARNING: ABSOLUTELY NO BROWN ONES) - as well as other interesting demands, excerpted at The Smoking Gun. Via.
posted by amyms on Dec 12, 2008 - 91 comments

Causing false public alarm

As those of you on the wrong email lists can probably guess, Snopes is overflowing with gang initiation rumors. What you may not know is that the New Jersey police recently arrested someone spreading those stories for "causing false public alarm." [more inside]
posted by tkolar on Dec 7, 2008 - 23 comments

Lyonesse - shadow island of the Atlantic

In Tennyson´s epic poem Idylls of the King, Lyonesse is the place where the final, epoch-shattering battle between Mordred and King Arthur takes place. In the older Arthurian romances, Lyonesse is the birthplace of Sir Tristan, and it is supposed to have bordered Cornwall in the southwest of England. No historical evidence of Lyonnesse has been found, and the academic consensus seems to be that the French author of the Prose Tristan got his British geography catastrophically wrong, and that he really meant Lothian in Scotland. There are, however, those who believe that Lyonesse was a real realm which once reached from the Scilly Islands to Land´s End. The people of Penzance and southwestern Cornwall certainly seem fond of stories about sunken lands, church bells in the deep, and drowned forests. According to family legend, the ancestor of the local Trevelyan family was a sole survivor who rode across the causeway to Cornwall as Lyonesse crumbled into the sea behind him.
posted by the_unutterable on Sep 27, 2008 - 14 comments

Beautiful Dynamite

Cyd Charisse passed away today at 86. Part of the MGM Golden Age, she first started out in minor roles usually as a dancer (1:52). It wasn't until the Gotta Dance routine with Gene Kelly in Singin' in the Rain did she begin to get meatier roles. [more inside]
posted by spec80 on Jun 17, 2008 - 49 comments

excuuuuuse me!

Well, excuse me, princess. Youtube one-link, but very much a catch-phrase.
posted by parmanparman on Jan 31, 2008 - 49 comments

Attend the tale of Sweeney Todd. He served a dark and a vengeful God!

Quick, before Tim Burton's "re-imagining dark gems of the 1970s" spree continues with the film version that will obliterate all recollection of the original musical thriller's style! Check out 1982's Emmy-winning televised performance of Sweeney Todd, with George Hearn and the inimitable Angela Lansbury. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15. Or, just skip to the highlights, A Little Priest, Epiphany. Also, check out the style of the inventive, minimalist revival or read the original penny dreadful!
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur on Oct 14, 2007 - 42 comments

Arriverci, Scooter.

A shortstop extraordinaire, loan pitchman, vocal accompanist, announcing icon. and friend to yogi's ...has left the building. RIP, Scooter.
posted by jonmc on Aug 14, 2007 - 38 comments

Old Lady Leary Left Her Lantern in the Shed

The Chicago Fire and the Web of Memory compiles a fascinating array of primary sources about the 1871 fire that destroyed 4 square miles of the city of Chicago, killing hundreds and leaving nearly one out of five residents homeless. Explore 3D images, music [embedded], children's drawings, and personal recollections. See also a pictorial survey of the damage, including fused marbles and metal hardware, related documents and images at the Library of Congress, and an exoneration of Mrs. O'Leary and her bovine companion, along with a suggestion by John Lienhart that police corruption and class struggle were more to blame than a cow [embedded audio].
posted by Miko on May 16, 2007 - 9 comments

Venus, get your gun.

I support gun control, but for 82-year-old Miss America Venus Ramey, I make an exception. The first redhead and the only native Kentuckian ever to be Miss America, she's pretty fearsome with a snub-nosed .38.
posted by tizzie on Apr 20, 2007 - 116 comments

Myths and Legends Story Creator

Make your own myth or legend online using Story Creator 2.
posted by Burhanistan on Apr 10, 2007 - 7 comments

Code Breaking

Did Anyone Really Follow the Drinking Gourd? Were you taught that slaves in the antebellum South sang this traditional song to convey coded instructions for escaping Northward? Were you taught that quilt block patterns could be read as a map to freedom, or that quilts were hung outside safe houses as signals to escaping slaves?Though these are among the most often taught stories of the operation of the Underground Railroad, current scholarship indicates that these aren't survivals of pre-Civil War African-American folklore, but legends constructed and popularized within the twentieth century, frequently by white writers and performers. In today's New York Times, these legends battle it out with fact in debate over the proposed design of a new Frederick Douglass memorial [PDF].
posted by Miko on Jan 23, 2007 - 42 comments

world tales

World Tales : See folk tales, myths and legends from around the world, brought to life by twenty Australian animators.
posted by dhruva on Jan 2, 2007 - 7 comments

You better watch out...

You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, but do you know Stekkjarstaur, Giljagaur, Stufur, Thvorusleikir, Pottaskefill, Askasleikir, Hurdarskellir, Skyrgamur, Bjugnakraekir, Gluggagaegir, Gattathefur, Ketkrokur and Kertasnikir? They're the Jolasveinar, the impish "Yuletide Lads" of Iceland, and those are only some of their many names. During the thirteen days before Christmas, legend says that they do their best to monkeywrench the celebrations with hijinks like stealing sausages, milk, and candles, and peeping into windows and up skirts. The children of gruesome child-eating trolls Gryla and Leppaludi, who were known for snatching naughty children, the elves got their start in the 17th century. In the years since, their image has apparently mellowed, and now they leave children presents in their shoes and limit themselves to mild pranks.
posted by Miko on Dec 22, 2006 - 21 comments

Lee Friedlander: "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car"

Little visual miracles. For more than forty years that most American of photographers, Chevalier in the Order of Arts and Letters Lee Friedlander, has recorded modern American urban life -- with its jumble of people, signs, buildings, and cars, and television sets. He likes to turn a common blunder of amateurs -- photographing something nearby with one's back to the sun -- into a leitmotif. His shadow plays the role of alter ego, sticking to the back of a woman's fur collar, clinging to a lamppost as a parade of drum majorettes passes by, reclining like a stuffed doll on a chair. Clever jigsaw puzzles, his pictures frequently reveal themselves to be laconic, austere poems to what Friedlander has termed "the American social landscape',' meaning mostly ordinary places and affairs. "Friedlander," an exhibition of more than 480 photographs and 25 books covering decades of work, runs at MoMA through Aug. 29, before traveling to Europe until 2007. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jun 14, 2005 - 8 comments

Page: 1 2