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15 posts tagged with lewiscarroll.
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A hard stare from a public bench bear

"London has become a literary playground: a project by the National Literacy Trust has scattered 50 book-shaped benches across the capital for the whole summer, each dedicated to an iconic London-related author or character." (The Guardian). The BBC report about the literary benches; the full list of benches from the Books about Town website. CNN has a slideshow that includes a nice photo of the Paddington Bear bench in use.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 25, 2014 - 11 comments

Down the Rabbit Hole

Curious Alice is a 1971 anti-drug film produced by the National Institute for Mental Health. Meant to reach children 8-10 years old, the film didn't really get it's intended message across. You can read more about it at the National Archives.
posted by dortmunder on Apr 27, 2014 - 33 comments

Snicker-snack

Boojum, a spacefaring Cthulhu Mythos story run through the filter of Lewis Carroll by Sarah Monette and Elizabeth Bear (Interview). A sequel in the same universe, Mongoose, Appeared in the Ellen Datlow edited anthology Lovecraft Unbound. An audio of Mongoose is available at the Drabblecast (part 1, part 2), as well as a further sequel, The Wreck of the Charles Dexter Ward (part 1, part 2)
posted by Artw on Sep 21, 2012 - 31 comments

Encarta Resurrected

"We are weak, writing is difficult, but for my own sake I do not regret this journey..." -from the final three Diaries Of Robert Falcon Scott (p. 166/167) which are now available scanned, transcribed, and narrated in fully searchable form by the British Library.
    Other books in the collection include:
  • Leonardo Da Vinci's 500+ page Codex Arundel scanned in its entirety.
  • William Blake's Notebook with explanatory notes (text & narration).
  • Mozart's Musical Diary with explanatory notes (text & narration) and playable musical pieces.
  • The original Alice's Adventures Underground scanned, transcribed, and narrated.
[more inside]
posted by lemuring on Jan 30, 2012 - 19 comments

Original "Alice" posted online

The original version of Alice in Wonderland, handwritten and hand-drawn by Lewis Carroll, has been posted online. The illustrations are a treat in themselves. [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Mar 17, 2010 - 26 comments

Gonzo in Wonderland

Ralph Steadman’s Alice in Wonderland. Salvador Dali’s Alice In Wonderland.
posted by mediareport on Mar 9, 2010 - 16 comments

Alice in Wonderland (1903)

Alice in Wonderland (1903), directed by Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow
posted by brundlefly on Feb 26, 2010 - 32 comments

maths in alice

Alice's adventures in algebra: Wonderland solved "Outgunned in the specialist press, Dodgson took his mathematics to his fiction. Using a technique familiar from Euclid's proofs, reductio ad absurdum, he picked apart the "semi-logic" of the new abstract mathematics, mocking its weakness by taking these premises to their logical conclusions, with mad results. The outcome is Alice's Adventures in Wonderland."
posted by dhruva on Dec 16, 2009 - 30 comments

Alices in Wonderlands

Alice illustrations other than Tenniel [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Dec 24, 2007 - 7 comments

Mathematics vs. Democracy: A Clear Winner or a Tie Game?

The Marquis de Condorcet and Admiral Jean-Charles de Borda were two men of the French Enlightenment who struggled with how to design voting systems that accurately reflected voters' preferences. Condorcet favored a method that required the winner in a multiparty election to win a series of head-to-head contests, but he also discovered that his method easily led to a paradoxes that produced no clear winners. The Borda method avoids the Condorcet paradox by requiring voters to rank choices numerically in order of preference, but this method is flawed because the withdrawal of a last-place candidate can reverse the election results. Mathematicians in the 19th century attempted to design better voting systems, including Lewis Carroll, who favored an early form of proportional representation. Economist Kenneth Arrow argued that designing a perfect voting system was futile, because his "impossibility theorem" proved that it's impossible to design a non-dictatorial voting system that fulfills five basic criteria of fairness. (more inside)
posted by jonp72 on Aug 27, 2007 - 43 comments

Jabberwocky!

Translations [previously]. Pronunciation guide. The movie. The engine. A poster. Spellchecked. And a weird link to Hamlet.
posted by YamwotIam on May 18, 2007 - 8 comments

Papapetrou & Lewis

Melbourne artist Polixeni Papapetrou takes photographs of her daughter that are inspired by Lewis Carroll. For the same reasons. [Links SFW but be careful clicking around]
posted by tellurian on Feb 10, 2005 - 14 comments

Mmmmm... Freedom of Speech-y

A Good Day for Video Games. Turns out that video games are protected by the First Amendment, at least according to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, which today overturned a St. Louis ruling that video games do not constitue protected speech. A good quote from the opinion: "If the first amendment is versatile enough to 'shield [the] painting of Jackson Pollock, music of Arnold Schoenberg, or Jabberwocky verse of Lewis Carroll,' we see no reason why the pictures, graphic design, concept art, sounds, music, stories, and narrative present in video games are not entitled to a similar protection. The mere fact that they appear in a novel medium is of no legal consequence."
posted by jscalzi on Jun 3, 2003 - 7 comments

Wonderful Anamorphic Art

You've probably seen those photo mosaics where a large image is made up of many smaller images acting as pixels. Kelly Houle has taken the idea a mile further by creating a photo collage that is also anamorphic -- a collage of illustrations and related material from Alice in Wonderland that, when a curved mirror is placed in the correct position, forms a portrait of Lewis Carroll. Absolutely amazing stuff.
posted by ewagoner on Jan 23, 2003 - 19 comments

TextArc

TextArc is an interactive program that reproduces the text of more than 2,000 books as works of art.
The software converts the text into an interactive map that allows viewers to quickly see relationships between words and characters at a glance, even without having read the book. Try it with Alice in Wonderland. (Links opens a full-screen window.)
posted by Mwongozi on Nov 30, 2002 - 9 comments

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