5 posts tagged with life and brokenlink.
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ephemera: (noun) a short lived thing

Ever since I became a TiVo addict, I've found myself wanting to use its features in real life, wishing I could rewind & replay moments of random comedy & chaos, usually involving my pugs. Soon, thanks the good folks at Deja View, I will be able to, with the help of a head mounted micro video camera unit that is always on, recording a 30 second buffer of real time, and up to four hours of manually recordable space for once you activate the record button. The scourge of ephemera will be wiped out in our lifetime.
posted by jonson on Jun 19, 2003 - 13 comments

Life Support

Life Support is an online help desk for everyday life. It operates like a tech support web site (with tickets, responses, etc.), but the issues are about religion, love, and politics instead of printers and device drivers. I got some interesting and/or entertaining responses to the issues I posted.
posted by oissubke on Jun 5, 2003 - 15 comments

"The music I want to hear hasn't been written yet. And I'm going to write it." What music do you want to hear? What books do you want to read? What films do you want to see? What software do you want to use? What are you doing to make it so? A meditation on the brevity of life and the choices we make of how to spend our time on earth. [more inside]
posted by Slithy_Tove on Jul 2, 2002 - 26 comments

Germs from Jupiter? Viruses from Venus?

Germs from Jupiter? Viruses from Venus? Nope, just live space-borne bacteria discovered floating around Earth. "Although the bugs from space are similar to bacteria on Earth, the scientists said the living cells found in samples of air from the edge of the planet's atmosphere are too far away to have come from Earth." (via waldo.net)
posted by carobe on Aug 2, 2001 - 8 comments

Water found on Jupiter moon

Water found on Jupiter moon "After months and months of wrestling with the data ... we believe there is very strong evidence of a layer of melted water beneath Ganymede's icy surface," said Margaret Kivelson, a space physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles.
posted by owillis on Dec 17, 2000 - 9 comments

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