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if P and Q are polynomials, let O1 be the order of blessed

King James Programming – "posts generated by a Markov chain trained on the King James Bible and Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs." SLTumbler
posted by tss on Dec 5, 2013 - 17 comments

(setq clock (simulate clock dt))

Clocks is a set of generative art pieces written in gazelle (a lisp (written in elisp!) that compiles to javascript) with the help of processing.js. Best viewed in Chrome.
posted by Jpfed on Dec 5, 2013 - 13 comments

Few Examples of Lisp Code Typography

Few Examples of Lisp Code Typography. From 1953 to 2012. (Via Lambda the Ultimate.)
posted by skynxnex on Mar 11, 2012 - 39 comments

(defun moment_of_silence (print "*"))

John McCarthy, AI pioneer, ACM Turning Award winner, National Medal of Science winner, Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at Stanford University and inventor of the Lisp programming language passed away suddenly last night at the age of 84.
posted by eriko on Oct 24, 2011 - 84 comments

(define this 'awesome)

Probably one of the 5 best amateur animated music videos about Lisp you'll see today. [more inside]
posted by DU on Oct 29, 2010 - 27 comments

Erik Naggum (1965-2009)

If anyone could flame from beyond the grave, it is he. Erik Naggum was a young programmer and Usenet philosopher who exemplified the new breed of smug Lisp weenie. His hatred for Perl, C++ and XML fueled his Olympian rants. He was cruel, but smart; he was articulate, but he used arguments ad hominem; he left a trail of scorched earth, but he had devoted friends. I didn't know him, but I enjoyed his expression of free thought. He died young after years of torment; R.I.P. [more inside]
posted by e.e. coli on Jun 21, 2009 - 72 comments

1965 - Kemeny and Kurtz go to 1964

A Brief, Incomplete, and Mostly Wrong History of Programming Languages
posted by Artw on May 8, 2009 - 47 comments

Feel your inadequacy

If you're like me, you are not a top computer science researcher, and you haven't written a classic book about programming and made it available online for free. Let's review who we're not. We're neither Abelson nor Sussman, and we haven't written Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (previous proof). We're not part of TeachScheme and we had no hand in the writing of How to Design Programs (not even the second edition, natch). Shriram Krishnamurthi didn't need our help to write Programming Languages: Application and Interpretation. We wish we were Simon Peyton-Jones and had a hand in The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages. [more inside]
posted by Monday, stony Monday on Apr 1, 2009 - 45 comments

A mouthful of bytecode

Bytecode-based virtual machines are the Next Big Thing in programming. You can run Lisp, Ruby, Python, OCaml, and yes even COBOL on the JVM. Or if you prefer your languages to be a bit more melodic there's J#, A#, P# and F#. Even C/C++ has a bytecode compiler now. That's not to mention languages that have their own VMs like Erlang or that are writing their own like Parrot or PyPy. [more inside]
posted by Skorgu on Dec 4, 2007 - 61 comments

(LOOP (FORMAT T "~%Hello Metafilter"))

Do you want to learn Lisp? The complete text of Harold Abelson's and Gerald Sussman's Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (2nd ed. 1996) is online with a bunch of additional resources. There is also a complete series of lectures based on the first edition given in 1986.
posted by Roger Dodger on Apr 4, 2007 - 65 comments

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