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4 posts tagged with magazine by MiguelCardoso.
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The Walrus

The Walrus: Does Canada Finally Have Its Quality Magazine? It's always been a mystery why Canada, with its appreciable intellectual weight, cultural sympathies and significant middlebrow readership, doesn't have a general magazine to rival with, say, Harper's, The Atlantic or The New Yorker. Well, The Walrus looks good - at least online. Is this it? Or am I unfairly overlooking other Canadian publications?
posted by MiguelCardoso on Dec 14, 2003 - 24 comments

Reading Matter For The Weekend

At Last A Luxurious Arts And Belles Lettres Magazine You Can Afford: If you have zilch, it's yours: The SCREAMonline, full of goodies for your pleasure. There's Kenn Brown's 8.5 foot DNA illustration [Flash req.]; sober reflections on the fattening of America; the strangely beautiful and boring Mt.Wilson Tower cam; Michael Corrigan's Confessions of a Shanty Irishman; some classic quotations from Woody Allen and the likes; a selection of bizarre record covers - and much more that is lovely to look at and entertaining to read. It's not exactly FMR, but then, how could it be? A propósito, does anybody know of other rich coffee-table weblogs or online magazines that are worth reading and yet look good enough to leave lying around on one's monitor? ;) And isn't still amazing that there are still so many free luxury items on the Web? [Via woods lot, itself a superb left-of-field example of the genre, much as it might pain it to be so described.]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Apr 4, 2003 - 10 comments

The Oldie: Celebrating The Sulphurous Glory Of Old Fartdom

The Oldie: Celebrating The Sulphurous Glory Of Old Fartdom If you're a sozzled, bilious and deeply reactionary misanthropic Brit who's over 80, hates anything foreign (specially Americans) and stubbornly refuses to die just for the pleasure of spiting the youngsters, then The Oldie is definitely the magazine for you. It couldn't be more "out of synch" with the "cool" MeFi "demographic" but it does share the same in-your-face fuckwittedness and I love it. Its unofficial editorial manifesto, drafted by the late, great Auberon Waugh, says it all:
1. Inveighing against the ignorance, idleness, stupidity, dishonesty and sexual incompetence of the young. 2. Insulting the young in any and every manifestation. 3. Insulting the old who seem to be deferring or otherwise sucking up to the young. 4. Promoting the idea of "age fascism" whereby the young are automatically seen as inferior. 5. Denouncing new things, new ideas, modernism in any form, especially anything proposed in the name of youth or by someone under the age of 40.[More inside]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Oct 4, 2002 - 23 comments

Philip Glass, Late Twentieth-Century Music And Your PC, Sort Of...

Philip Glass, Late Twentieth-Century Music And Your PC, Sort Of... Andante's Carte Blanche is a new multimedia magazine dedicated to contemporary music. Its first guest-editor is Philip Glass and he's assembled an interestingly unscholarly, offbeat and pleasantly accessible issue. At least for those of us who generally pay contemporary music (too) little attention. I wonder why this is, as it's invariably challenging or enlightening when we do. Who knows? Perhaps Carte Blanche may convince some of us pop-obsessed philistines to change our ways... [ Composer John Adams, writer Susan Sontag, choreographer Mark Morris and British director Jonathan Miller will follow in what promises to be an unmissable online proposition.]
posted by MiguelCardoso on Aug 1, 2002 - 12 comments

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