633 posts tagged with maps.
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Globalization is ancient

Mapping the Mercantilist World Economy Our current globalized capitalist world economy was built on Mercantilist foundations, put in place in the first phase of global European expansion, the second phase being that of the formal European empires of the industrial age. In the case of the “New World” in the Americas, Europe’s Mercantilists were creating entirely new trade networks and hinterlands. In the Old World of Afro-Eurasia however, Europe was rearranging the existing, much older, world economy it had been part of since the Middle Ages. I wanted to illustrate this first phase of global capitalism with thematic maps.
posted by infini on Aug 22, 2016 - 13 comments

Map of Roads Leading to Rome

Explore the Peutinger Map is a website companion to Prof. Richard J. A. Talbert's Rome's World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered (Google Books, Amazon). It presents The Peutinger Map in different ways, including with overlays and lists of geographical features. But what's The Peutinger Map? Also known as Tabula Peutingeriana, it is a Medieval copy of highly stylized 4th Century map of the Roman road network, extending to India. Jacob Ford explains why it is often compared to modern public transit maps [pdf] and then redraws one section as a New York Metro map. Euratlas has scans of the Medieval manuscript stored at the Austrian National Library and Wikimedia Commons has a high quality scan of Konrad Miller's authoritative 1888 facsimile edition.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 14, 2016 - 21 comments

“Maps codify the miracle of existence.”

Free, Printable USGS Quads National Geographic (the one now owned by Fox?!) has put together a website where you can download USGS (previously) maps that have been processed to print on standard letter paper.
posted by DigDoug on Aug 9, 2016 - 32 comments

"A Remarkable New Photo Map of Old London"

Citylab: "Launched last week, Collage, The London Picture Map allows you to trace London’s visual history street by street. Supported by the City of London Corporation, it’s the result of two full years of digitizing and mapping images from the London Metropolitan Archive and the Guildhall Art Gallery, which together possess the largest collection of London images in the world." [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Aug 5, 2016 - 6 comments

If I had to sum it up in a single word, I'd say "signs"

Dale Sanderson is a third generation map nerd (and professional cartographer) and the creator of USEnds.com an extensive site full of photos of and trivia about US highway endpoints. Submit your own!
posted by jessamyn on Jul 3, 2016 - 34 comments

fucking up his entire morning routine 2 get another look at the cute boy

I started thinking absently about Steve Rogers’ jogging route during my run today and then i couldn’t STOP thinking about it : an exegesis on the daily run of Steve Rogers (aka Cap) in Captain America: The Winter Soldier.
posted by Greg Nog on Jun 30, 2016 - 78 comments

The Surprising History of the Infographic

Clive Thompson and Smithsonian magazine bring us a history of data visualization, including classics from Florence Nightingale to the red-and-blue state divide. Via Kottke.
posted by Etrigan on Jun 28, 2016 - 3 comments

Validating fodar in the Artic Circle

Tallest Mountain in US Arctic Found Using New Technique A 50 year debate has been settled by collaboration between glaciologist Matt Nolan and champion skier Kit DesLauriers.
posted by Michele in California on Jun 23, 2016 - 12 comments

Bill's Port Smaps

Hand-drawn maps of Negro League teams, defunct NFL teams, the first NHL league, Ukrainian FCs. More maps, hand-drawn and not.
posted by Krom Tatman on Jun 22, 2016 - 3 comments

Here be swamp rabbits.

How old is your map? A handy guide from xkcd.
posted by phunniemee on Jun 1, 2016 - 39 comments

What happened to Google Maps?

Justin O'Beirne compares the 2010 and 2016 editions of Google Maps and finds a lack of balance — especially after looking at a map printed in the 1960s. [more inside]
posted by metaquarry on May 28, 2016 - 129 comments

Terrapattern

Terrapattern, currently in alpha, is a visual search tool for satellite imagery. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on May 25, 2016 - 3 comments

Maps of Britain and Ireland’s ancient tribes, kingdoms and DNA

"For map fans, some new maps showing Celt, Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Viking territories in the British Isles. Also, the remarkable DNA map which shows how modern Britons still live in the same tribal kingdom areas as their ancestors in 600 AD."
posted by stoneweaver on May 15, 2016 - 29 comments

Weather Map Data Porn

The National Weather Service's Enhanced Data Display is in its experimental but still fun-to-play-with stage. It's a product of the Charleston, WV, NWS station's Weather Ready Nation Pilot Project. There are demos and tutorials on NWS Charleston's Youtube page. Mobile version
posted by not_on_display on May 9, 2016 - 20 comments

The bear doesn't panic or climb a tree to flee. It stands its ground.

What does a bear in yellowstone do all day? For the first time, trek into the wild backcountry of America's first national park and see what it looks like from a bear's point of view. Special cameras were attached to the tracking collars of two grizzlies and two black bears in Yellowstone...Tag along as National Geographic gives you an unprecedented window into some of the most fearsome predators on Earth. Watch as these bears act as tour guides through their secret world, with little human intervention.
posted by jnnla on Apr 26, 2016 - 12 comments

Interactive visualisation of world shipping

You can see movements of the global merchant fleet over the course of 2012, overlaid on a bathymetric map. There is a worthwhile introductory narration, then you can can "pan and zoom in the usual ways, and skip back and forward in time using the timeline at the bottom of the screen. " [more inside]
posted by hawthorne on Apr 25, 2016 - 7 comments

Access Together

Access Together crowdsources accessibility information about businesses and other venues. The site is relatively new, and coverage outside of NYC is sparse, but contributing is easy.
posted by jedicus on Apr 20, 2016 - 1 comment

Interactive timeline of history

Chronas is a history project linking Wikipedia and Wikidata that lets you use a time slider at the bottom to see how the world looked any given date during the past 2000 years, watching realms grow and disappear. Video describing how it works. If you click on the countries/regions/empires shown, then it will show you the appropriate Wikipedia entry. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 20, 2016 - 24 comments

Yes, zombies can swim.

Corpseburg lays a zombie survival skin over Google Maps. Punch in an address to create a map. Scavenge local schools, businesses and hospitals for food, weapons, meds and barricade materials.
posted by klangklangston on Apr 9, 2016 - 12 comments

Mapping lead exposure risk by census tract

Vox, with the help of the Washington State Department of Health, has used "housing and poverty data in our calculations to [map] areas of risk" for lead poisoning. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Apr 6, 2016 - 32 comments

ID that landform you see from your window seat

". . .the airplane seat is sort of a planetarium for the Earth,” she says. “It’s a great way to inspire people to learn about the sciences.”
Flyover Country is a free app that correlates geo/paleo databases, maps, and other data sources with your phone's GPS to provide information and identification about the landscape below as you fly over it - no wi-fi necessary. [more inside]
posted by barchan on Apr 5, 2016 - 56 comments

Online safari in South Africa

Walk around South Africa online with Google Street View. Safari means journey in Swahili. See some of the wildlife in Kruger National Park, meander along the top of Table Mountain, around the Kirstenbosch Gardens or along Cape Town's beautiful beaches. There are some people who can never afford to physically come to South Africa and see these places in their lifetime, and hopefully this will give them the opportunity to experience it a little bit. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 11, 2016 - 2 comments

Ziphius, rumored to slice boats in half with its dorsal fin

Toronto-based artist Bailey Henderson sculpts the fearsome sea creatures depicted on medieval and Renaissance-era maps. [more inside]
posted by Faint of Butt on Feb 8, 2016 - 13 comments

The Road Everyone Hates

Chaz Hutton Draws Graphs: Most recently "A Map Of Every City."
posted by The Whelk on Jan 24, 2016 - 25 comments

American Panorama

"American Panorama is an historical atlas of the United States for the twenty-first century. It combines cutting-edge research with innovative interactive mapping techniques, designed to appeal to anyone with an interest in American history or a love of maps." [more inside]
posted by dancestoblue on Jan 21, 2016 - 3 comments

Selective Blindness in Google Earth and Google Maps

Sorry we have no imagery here: Self censorship in Google geographical images Google's original mission statement from 1998 stated was to: “organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” [more inside]
posted by Faintdreams on Jan 20, 2016 - 17 comments

The Life of Poo

The San Francisco sewer system is an amazing feat of engineering. Almost entirely gravity-run, it directs both stormwater and wastewater into a combined system of pipes that flow to wastewater treatment facilities. In the Life of Poo, you can type in an address in San Francisco and see where your toilet waste flows.
[more inside] posted by parrishioner on Jan 14, 2016 - 44 comments

Explore a little world from the comfort of your home

Hamburg's Miniatur Wonderland has been featured on Metafilter before (1, 2) but now you can explore 9 of its sections as if you were there with Google Maps.
posted by jontyjago on Jan 13, 2016 - 14 comments

First X, Then Y, Now Z : Landmark Thematic Maps and Their Makers

This section reads as would a biblical genealogy of sorts: Alexander von Humboldt (wiki) taught Heinrich Berghaus (short wiki bio)and influenced Alexander Keith Johnston; Berghaus taught August Petermann (wiki); and Petermann collaborated with Berghaus and Johnston. More accurately, it reflects the passing on of the thematic torch lit by Humboldt. There were isolated “ignitions” throughout Europe before him—he, of course, was not the first to construct a thematic map or even to think of how one might do it—but every science needs a founding figure. More than anyone who preceded him, Humboldt provided that role.
Landmark Thematic Atlases, from Princeton University Library's Historic Maps Collection website of Landmark Thematic Maps.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 11, 2016 - 2 comments

New Zealand is not a small country but a large village...

World Maps without New Zealand
posted by blue_beetle on Dec 22, 2015 - 83 comments

All Roads Lead to Rome(s)

Every cell of this grid contains the starting point to one of our journeys to Rome. Now that we have our 486,713 starting points we need to find out how we could reach Rome as our destination. For this we created a algorithm that calculates one route for every trip. The more often a single street segment is used, the stronger it is drawn on the map. The maps as outcome of this project is somewhere between information visualization and data art, unveiling mobility and a very large scale.
Some beautiful and interesting visualizations of transportation models for Europe and the world, including all the towns called "Rome" in the United States. Also: Urban Mobility Fingerprints and Create Your Own (Europe Only).
posted by Rumple on Dec 10, 2015 - 10 comments

An illustrator in Dali, China

Jason Pym is a British illustrator who has been living in Dali, China for 11 years. His love for his adopted city in an idyllic part of Yunnan province is plain to see. He also makes illustrations for Penguin Books China, and labels for his wife's homemade jam, featuring cos-playing dragons. (Here's a link in Chinese with more dragon-goodness.)
posted by of strange foe on Dec 10, 2015 - 7 comments

Global weather

Windyty is a very pretty way of visualising current and forecast weather data from around the globe.
posted by Dim Siawns on Nov 30, 2015 - 11 comments

Therapihkal

In the early 1960's, drugs like LSD and psilocybin found their way out of university labs and onto the street -- and their value as medicine was lost as their status as protest and party drugs emerged. Mass recreational use, conservative political forces and a continuing media frenzy ensured the vilification of hallucinogens – until drugs like LSD and magic mushrooms were completely outlawed in 1970. Serious medical research would not begin again until the early 21st century, four decades later.
Turn on, tune in, and heal thyself - CBC's Ideas presents High Culture, a 3-hour (2--3) series examining the use of psychedelics to curb anxiety, alcoholism, and depression. [more inside]
posted by mannequito on Nov 26, 2015 - 22 comments

“As though the New Jersey suburbs were grafted onto South Carolina”

10 ways to map Northern Virginia. 12 ways to map the midwest. Which states are in "The South?"
posted by schmod on Nov 24, 2015 - 89 comments

Sketches Tolkien Used to Build Middle-Earth

"HOW DID J.R.R. Tolkien create The Lord of the Rings? The simple answer is that he wrote it. He sat down in a chair in 1937 and spent more than a dozen years working on what remains a masterwork of fantasy literature and a genius stroke of immersive worldbuilding. The more complicated answer is that in addition to writing the story, he drew it. The many maps and sketches he made while drafting The Lord of the Rings informed his storytelling, allowing him to test narrative ideas and illustrate scenes he needed to capture in words. For Tolkien, the art of writing and the art of drawing were inextricably intertwined." [more inside]
posted by SpacemanStix on Oct 10, 2015 - 15 comments

We found love in a Hopeless Pass

@sadtopographies: An Instagram account cataloging the most unfortunately named places on Earth, from Shades of Death Road in New Jersey to Mamungkukumpurangkuntjunya (or "Where the devil urinates") Hill in Australia and everywhere in between.
posted by Cash4Lead on Oct 9, 2015 - 12 comments

Novel geography

The Map of Literature. Martin Vargic, creator of the Map of the Internet 1.0, has created an insanely detailed "National Geographic" map of Literature, where "Jurassic Park is located between 1984 and Clear and Present Danger on the continent of Thrillers, a stone's throw away from H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds." [more inside]
posted by storybored on Oct 6, 2015 - 6 comments

Daredevil unavailable for comment.

"In August we asked readers to settle age-old disputes and draw where their neighborhoods begin and end. More than 12,000 New Yorkers responded, drawing maps in more than 280 neighborhoods and giving us a pretty detailed look at the local geography."
posted by griphus on Oct 1, 2015 - 27 comments

…and about South Loop. Nobody seems to agree what that is.

This is where Chicagoans say the borders of their neighborhoods are. Crowdsourced cartography from residents asked to draw their neighborhood. [more inside]
posted by nebulawindphone on Sep 28, 2015 - 25 comments

True Tube Topography

Thanks to a Freedom of Information request, Transport for London have released a geogrphically-accurate map of the tube. [PDF] [more inside]
posted by schmod on Sep 18, 2015 - 22 comments

Like Sim City, but without all the fun parts

Open GeoFiction is a user-editable map of a fictional world built on top of the Open StreetMap platform. [more inside]
posted by baniak on Sep 14, 2015 - 10 comments

Usually the author happens to have a map on hand

How exactly does one go about making a map of a make-believe place? [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 14, 2015 - 13 comments

It’s where you’ve been living this whole time.

The True Size Of… is an interactive demonstration of the limitations of the Mercator projection. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Sep 8, 2015 - 45 comments

Mapping the beautiful chaos of informal transit

As transit systems go, the matatus in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded at the region's edges... Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it... In the absence of a formal public transit system in Kenya's capital, people have created a comprehensive – if imperfect – one on their own. And now we know that it looks like this. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Aug 27, 2015 - 21 comments

United States of Emoji

Which emoji does each state use more than others?* [more inside]
posted by box on Aug 20, 2015 - 16 comments

A Time-Honored Tradition

Draw Where You Think Your [NYC] Neighborhood Borders Are on This Map
posted by griphus on Aug 11, 2015 - 39 comments

An In-Depth History of One Block of Greene Street in SoHo, NYC

The entirety of Greene Street in SoHo is pretty short, as New York City streets go -- just five blocks long. Walk along it today between Houston and Prince Streets and you’ll pass an Apple Store, a Ralph Lauren store, and a variety of other high-end retailers. A hundred and forty years ago, you’d be walking by brothels. A new website, The Greene Street Project: A Long History of a Short Block, covers more than four hundred years of that one block section -- just 486 feet long -- illustrated with photographs, maps, newspaper clippings, survey data, and charts. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 6, 2015 - 4 comments

Mapping the United Swears of America

Hell, damn and bitch are especially popular in the south and southeast. Douche is relatively common in northern states. Bastard is beloved in Maine and New Hampshire, and those states – together with a band across southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas – are the areas of particular motherfucker favour. Crap is more popular inland, fuck along the coasts. Fuckboy – a rising star* – is also mainly a coastal thing, so far. from Strong Language via Kottke [NSFW language, natch]
posted by chavenet on Jul 30, 2015 - 104 comments

Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips

Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips
"The...map is the result of a painstaking and admittedly quixotic effort to catalog the country as it has been described in the American road-tripping literature. It includes every place-name reference in 12 books about cross-country travel...and maps the authors' routes on top of one another. You can track an individual writer's descriptions of the landscape as they traveled across it, or you can zoom in to see how different authors have written about the same place at different times."
[more inside] posted by kirkaracha on Jul 23, 2015 - 22 comments

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