577 posts tagged with maps.
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Randomness in map design

"I introduced an element of randomness into a recent map design. Misplaced buildings and overlapping areas of texture bring energy and excitement to the experience of viewing a map. The end result is a little disorienting, but still mostly familiar."
posted by moonmilk on Mar 19, 2014 - 19 comments

How close do you live to a nuclear power plant? And other maps.

See how close you live to a nuclear power plant on this interactive map featured in Smithsonian. It's created by ESRI, home to all kinds of other maps, like the Battle of the Big Boxes, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, the location of uninsured Americans, a Timeline of the UK's Tallest Buildings, and more. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 14, 2014 - 38 comments

Judgmental maps

Judgmental maps of cities/areas including Los Angeles (featuring “botoxed cougars in luxury condos”), Northern Virginia (including “closeted Hispanic husbands”), Richmond, VA (where one finds the “scary Walmart”), Memphis (where there are “people proud, yet ashamed, to be from Memphis"), Chattanooga (see “rich white people & gnomes”), Nashville (one part is “gentrified to a great level of inconvenience”), Phoenix, San Antonio, and “Canada, prolly.”
posted by goofyfoot on Mar 5, 2014 - 115 comments

Grateful Dead vs. Phish and Other Distinctions

Music Machinery presents a map of each U.S. state's most distinct favorite band or recording artist, as well as an app for playing with the data.
posted by Navelgazer on Feb 26, 2014 - 75 comments

Toronto Historical Map viewer

The Toronto Historical Map viewer (created by Nathan Ng, also behind the Historical Maps of Toronto website) is a zoomable map that allows the viewer to shift between maps of the city at numerous points from 1818 to 2012. [more inside]
posted by ricochet biscuit on Feb 18, 2014 - 13 comments

A cartographic history of why North, not East or South, is up

How the north ended up on top of the map is an article by Nick Danforth, author/curator of (The/Mid) Afternoon Map blog, detailing how the north-up orientation came to be the default orientation, looking beyond Eurocentrism to Byzantine monks and Majorcan Jews who set the path for modern cartography. If you want more information, you might enjoy the Wikipedia article on the history of cartography, or you can really dig deep with the three-volume text, The History of Cartography, which is available in full from the University of Chicago Press online, split into individual PDFs for each chapter. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 18, 2014 - 28 comments

Tencent Maps, China's Answer to Google Streetview

Tencent Maps - Look at some of the remotest parts of China. While some of the off-the-beaten-path images on Tencent Maps are actually static panoramas, other more quirky routes offer full coverage for mile after mile, as seen on the Li river in Guangxi province where you can cruise on a boat amidst the famous karst peaks that don’t look like any other hill or mountain range you’ve ever seen before. [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Feb 11, 2014 - 14 comments

Fighting segregation in housing: There’s a map for that

A single mom, Nicole just completed a degree in early childhood development at the local community college. She has been patching together part-time work around her studies and Joe’s schedule. Until 2009, Nicole and Joe lived in a poor neighborhood in Baltimore. Now they’re in Columbia, Md., half an hour away by car, but a world away in terms of opportunity. At Joe’s former elementary school in Baltimore, 97 percent of the students are low income, and 97 percent are African-American. His middle school in Columbia is one-third low income, with white, Asian, Hispanic and multiracial students making up just over half the population. In their old Baltimore neighborhood, Nicole says, she saw a man get shot in the leg in front of a corner bar as she held baby Joe in her arms.
posted by josher71 on Feb 6, 2014 - 12 comments

The African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean

Over the course of nearly 20 centuries, millions of East Africans crossed the Indian Ocean and its several seas and adjoining bodies of water in their journey to distant lands, from Arabia and Iraq to India and Sri Lanka. Called Kaffir, Siddi, Habshi, or Zanji, these men, women and children from Sudan in the north to Mozambique in the south Africanized the Indian Ocean world and helped shape the societies they entered and made their own. Free or enslaved, soldiers, servants, sailors, merchants, mystics, musicians, commanders, nurses, or founders of dynasties, they contributed their cultures, talents, skills and labor to their new world, as millions of their descendants continue to do. Yet, their heroic odyssey remains little known. The African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean World traces a truly unique and fascinating story of struggles and achievements across a variety of societies, cultures, religions, languages and times.
posted by infini on Feb 6, 2014 - 9 comments

mapschool

mapschool [via mefi projects]
posted by aniola on Feb 4, 2014 - 15 comments

American Cities: Before and After

Smithsonian Magazine's interactive map series on American cities. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 31, 2014 - 4 comments

What four commonly used projections do, as shown on a human head

Maps can help make sense of the world, but they can also distory your sense of reality (Archive.org stream view, page 58 of Elements of Map Projection with Applications to Map and Chart Construction). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 13, 2014 - 26 comments

A spectacular historical atlas refashioned for the 21st century

Here you will find one of the greatest historical atlases: Charles O. Paullin and John K. Wright's Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, first published in 1932. This digital edition reproduces all of the atlas's nearly 700 maps. Many of these beautiful maps are enhanced here in ways impossible in print, animated to show change over time or made clickable to view the underlying data—remarkable maps produced eight decades ago with the functionality of the twenty-first century.
posted by cthuljew on Dec 28, 2013 - 8 comments

Found at sea

An emergent map of the 18th and 19th century world
posted by spbmp on Dec 26, 2013 - 15 comments

Maps

Open data from balloon and kite photography
posted by aniola on Dec 26, 2013 - 12 comments

GeoQuiz

Can you name a firth in Scotland where the dolphins have individual names? The destination of Haiti's Kita Nago parade? A Sami Village in Lapland where tourists go to see the Northern Lights? A former "city of pirates" on the Adriatic Coast? Every weekday, listeners of PRI's international-news radio show The World are treated to the serendipity of a brief journey to a distant point on the globe. It's part of the daily GeoQuiz, a challenging geographical trivia game enhanced with ambient audio, imagery, mapping, and revealing details of history and landscape. You can play along via Twitter or subscribe to the podcast - either way, this 5 minute vacation will make you a little bit smarter about this incredible planet.
posted by Miko on Dec 13, 2013 - 6 comments

Bears Bears Bears. Too many bears

Special Report: BEARS! [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Dec 13, 2013 - 31 comments

The archipelago of militarized space

The map of US military installations by artist Josh Begley uses the US military's list of bases (plus a few other sources) to provide satellite image maps of hundreds of military sites around the world. For similar efforts, see Radical Cartography and the always-amazing work of Trevor Paglen
posted by blahblahblah on Dec 12, 2013 - 10 comments

"the center of the Earth is off by about two meters"

What Happens To Google Maps When Tectonic Plates Move? [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 11, 2013 - 19 comments

I regret that I only have so much wall space to fill.

There's a pretty good chance you've seen Ork Posters' city map posters celebrating the neighborhoods of San Francisco, Washington, DC, or Seattle, among others. But have you seen Archie Archambault's more conceptual letterpress circle maps? Or These Are Things' floating-text versions? How about Parts + Labour's batty view of Austin? Bored by uniform fonts? Check out some festive breakdowns of New York (by I Lost My Dog) and Madrid (by Helena Ecija). Not epic enough? Maybe you'll like Rodger Binyone's rock-tour style posters, like Baltimore or Chicago. Perhaps you'd rather check out neighborhoods in isolation? Not to worry, Meredith Miotke has Detroit covered. semi-previously
posted by psoas on Dec 4, 2013 - 18 comments

1854 Map of the world's tallest mountains and longest rivers

Behold, a 1854 Map of the world's tallest mountains and longest rivers (alt. link), as understood at that point in time, when Dhaulagiri was thought to be the tallest mountain in the world. This is taken from the General Atlas Of The World: Containing Upwards Of Seventy Maps, which can be read (awkwardly) on Archive.org as scanned from black and white microform, or go straight for the good stuff and browse the full color maps in David Rumsey's collection of high-resolution scans of historic maps (via Dark Roasted Blend and io9).
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 21, 2013 - 17 comments

All of this is Nebraska.

Here’s What Happens When You Ask People To Draw A Map Of The USA From Memory (single Buzzfeed link)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 14, 2013 - 131 comments

Places Are Made Of A Thousand Stories

"I want to see the world. Follow a map to its edges, and keep going. Forgo the plans. Trust my instincts. Let curiosity be my guide.
I want to change hemispheres and sleep with unfamiliar stars and let the journey unfold before me."

Maptia is on a mission to gather first-person stories from travelers, "to create the most inspirational map in the world." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 12, 2013 - 3 comments

Etymology maps: charting various words throughout Europe

Redditor sp07 started a Reddit trend: creating etymology maps of Europe, with more to be seen in r/etymologymaps.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 10, 2013 - 48 comments

The eleven nations of America

"There’s never been an America, but rather several Americas—each a distinct nation. There are eleven nations today. Each looks at violence, as well as everything else, in its own way." " [more inside]
posted by aka burlap on Nov 7, 2013 - 83 comments

The Science of a Great Subway Map

Researchers at an MIT lab have devised a way to determine how well straphangers can comprehend a subway map in a single glance. Massimo Vignelli really DID know what he was doing.
posted by Chrysostom on Oct 30, 2013 - 91 comments

Welcome to Offal Pudding Lane

Take a fly-through tour of 17th century London! Six students from De Montfort University have created a 3D representation of London before the Great of Fire of 1666. The digital model is based on the area surrounding Thomas Farriner's bakery in Pudding Lane, where the Great Fire began. The project is the winning entry in the Off The Map competition, in which students were invited to build 3D models based on maps at the British Library.
posted by EXISTENZ IS PAUSED on Oct 27, 2013 - 40 comments

The Map Is Not The Territory

Maps by Shannon Rankin [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 26, 2013 - 3 comments

All Tokyo trains in real time.

All Tokyo trains in real time.
posted by KokuRyu on Oct 15, 2013 - 47 comments

Humming Ashokan Farewell While Viewing Is Optional

The Civil War Trust's animated maps provides viewers with a bird's eye view of American Civil War battles.
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Oct 9, 2013 - 10 comments

Britain Built By Billions of Blocks

The Ordnance Survey (the national mapping authority for Great Britain) has a large amount of its mapping data available online for free use. Over the past few weeks, one of its summer interns has been using a few of its datasets to recreate the whole of mainland GB at 50:1 scale in Minecraft.
posted by ZsigE on Sep 24, 2013 - 22 comments

The map is not the story

The Book Globe has mapped the settings of all the 267 novels nominated for the Booker Prize since 1969.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 17, 2013 - 21 comments

A world of equal districts

World map divided into 665 equally populated districts
posted by allen.spaulding on Sep 16, 2013 - 64 comments

Infographic Maps

Where in the world are you most likely to be hit by lightening? Where's the best place to go to totally escape from the Internet? Which countries has Britain *not* invaded? [more inside]
posted by cairdeas on Sep 14, 2013 - 65 comments

A world in upheaval

A map of every protest everywhere since 1979 (some caveats are noted in the accompanying article).
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 26, 2013 - 18 comments

Hic Sunt Dracones

A collector has found what may be the oldest globe to depict the New World, dated 1504 and engraved two half ostrich eggs. The Hunt-Lenox Globe may be, according to analysis by Stefaan Missinne in The Portolan, designed after this new discovery. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Aug 26, 2013 - 5 comments

I paint my maps with a broad brush.

Which US State is the most overrated? Which would you like to see kicked out of America? Which has the weirdest accent? Which has the best food? Business Insider polls Americans across the country on important questions like these and maps the results. [more inside]
posted by Solon and Thanks on Aug 20, 2013 - 210 comments

How complex are corporate structures?

Visualisations of corporate ownership for six banks: Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, JP Morgan and Wells Fargo.
posted by frimble on Aug 2, 2013 - 31 comments

Locals and Tourists

Some people interpreted the Geotaggers' World Atlas maps to be maps of tourism. This set is an attempt to figure out if that is really true. Some cities (for example Las Vegas and Venice) do seem to be photographed almost entirely by tourists. Others seem to have many pictures taken in places that tourists don't visit. Blue points on the map are pictures taken by locals (people who have taken pictures in this city dated over a range of a month or more). Map of photosets (scroll through photo thumbnails to discover new cities in the photoset [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Jul 26, 2013 - 10 comments

Mapping the Midwest

How do you define the Midwest? As part of their exhibit Reinvention in the Urban Midwest (in most-certainly-not-in-the-Midwest Boston) Sasaki has created an online tool for people to contribute what the boundaries of the Midwest are for them. Results can be sorted by respondents' percentage of time spent in the Midwest and state of birth. An Atlantic Cities article shows one writer's opinion, and also links to Bill Rankin's similar Midwest mapping project on his always-excellent Radical Cartography site. An excerpt from The Midwest: God's Gift to Planet Earth has a more irreverent take on mapping the region.
posted by andrewesque on Jul 24, 2013 - 190 comments

"align the nation’s political landscape with its natural resource base"

our highly speculative proposal for the reconfiguration of the political geography of the United States to better conform to the spatial distribution of various water resources, such as rivers, aquifers, and man-made infrastructures.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 15, 2013 - 14 comments

Reviews that mention hangover in San Francisco

The new Yelp Wordmap uses review keyword density to depict which big city neighborhoods are the most "sketchy", "yuppie", "hipster", "bacon" and much more.
posted by changeling on Jul 2, 2013 - 33 comments

Cartozia Tales

CARTOZIA IS A WORLD OF MANY STORIES Each issue of Cartozia Tales will feature stories by nine indy cartoonists. Each of us will be bringing his or her separate ideas, imagination, and drawing style to the world that we're sharing. Every issue will be full of surprises, and no one knows where the stories will wind up. [more inside]
posted by jillithd on Jun 21, 2013 - 3 comments

Subjective Cartography

If New York Were A Blank Slate, How Would You Fill It In? is a piece on Becky Cooper's book Mapping Manhattan: A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story in Maps by 75 New Yorkers both famous and not. Cooper's Map Your Memories tumblr. Found from Brain Pickings, which has much more. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 19, 2013 - 6 comments

Maps of Tweets: locals v. tourists, languages, and mobile devices

Digital mapping startup MapBox teams up with social data warehouse Gnip to create some stunning visualizations of every geotagged tweet since September 2011. [more inside]
posted by Nelson on Jun 19, 2013 - 7 comments

3-D Mappa Mundi

Mapping The Newest Old Map Of The World: A full-sized, 3D plaster relief facsimile of the Hereford Mappa Mundi, the largest surviving medieval map of the world (Previously).
posted by homunculus on Jun 18, 2013 - 7 comments

Mischievous or Mischievious?

Interactive map of pronunciation and use of various words and phrases differs by region in the US. Based on Bert Vaux's online survey of English dialects, the program allows you to see results for individual cities, as well as nationwide (though inexplicably it does not include Alaska or Hawaii).
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 5, 2013 - 133 comments

Google Maps, Now Customized

For years, Google Maps has been the map of our world in a historically unprecedented way. The new Google Maps (announcement) will eschew the uniformity of the old Maps and instead customize the map experience based on a user's behavior. Some are concerned how this artificial narrowing will affect the way we experience places and relate to our urban spaces. Others believe the customization makes the new maps more honest. Most, however, will probably just want to comment on the huge overhaul to the interface.
posted by Defenestrator on May 29, 2013 - 104 comments

The Poetics & Politics of Picturing the World

The atlas is more than a cartographic genre. It is a way of thinking, of ordering, and experiencing the world... In the age of Google Earth, this online exhibition of maps from the 16th to 20th centuries is meant to stir public interest in the history of the atlas and cartography.
posted by spamandkimchi on May 18, 2013 - 13 comments

The many ways of showing how we get from A to B

Transit Maps. Designer Cameron Booth's blog and review of transit maps, diagrams, design and artwork from all over the world. [more inside]
posted by andrewesque on May 13, 2013 - 8 comments

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