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Disney Parks, Past and Present

Plenty of people collect Disneyana, the toys, books, animation cels, and theme-park souvenirs. Then there are those fans who collect information and details on the Disney parks themselves, collecting official park maps or drawing up their own ride blueprints, assembling the design history behind the attractions, and even collecting vintage tickets and ticket books. Yesterland (previously: 1, 2, 3) is an ever-growing collection of Disneyland history, and has an updated collection of links to similar fan sites and Imagineering blogs, which is a whole collection of rabbit holes of nostalgia and behind-the-scense information. So grab a riding crop and pretend like it's the 60s all over again!
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 15, 2012 - 9 comments

 

Old Books

Old Book Illustrations are vintage pictures that were originally wood engravings or woodcuts, etchings or metal engravings. Old Book Art is pictures, drawings, maps and other images from antiquarian, public-domain books and other old documents. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Mar 10, 2012 - 8 comments

Cartoo

Cartoo uses Google Maps to show you how far you could get by car, bike, or foot in a set amount of time.
posted by Paragon on Mar 8, 2012 - 38 comments

"Like Google for old maps"

Recently went live: A central repository of maps held by institutions across the globe. Over 60,000 maps. oldmapsonline.org
posted by cashman on Mar 5, 2012 - 25 comments

Google StreetView For The Ocean

The Catlin Seaview Survey is using panoramic cameras to take interactive photographic journeys of the world's most spectacular (and endangered) oceanic environments, starting with Australia's Great Barrier Reef. [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Feb 23, 2012 - 5 comments

Old Maps of New Jersey

Here are some old New Jersey maps, available online. Take a look at this map of southern New Jersey made by Dutch settlers in 1669. The Dutch labeled Cape May "Cabo May." Take a look at Delaware Bay. The Dutch called it Godyn's Bay. This 1709 map shows a division between east and west New Jersey. Probably most interesting of all is this map from 1795. Here, you can see archaic names of towns. What is now Pennington was once called "Pennytown." Lawrenceville was once called "Maidenhead." What is today called Hightstown was once called "Hiatstown." How about that little island off the southwestern New Jersey coast, Egg Island? Is that even there anymore?
posted by candasartan on Feb 10, 2012 - 26 comments

Recreating the map of the United States

The United States of 2012 : Esquire Magazine pulls together five maps that they believe reflect the zeitgeist of the current era. Of special interest is the "Where's Waldo"-like fourth map, which illustrates how minorities and the poor are either included in or excluded from American communities. (2805 x 1813 px version) Also, the aforementioned Eric Fischer's Flickr photostream is excellent collection of his maps.
posted by desjardins on Feb 10, 2012 - 12 comments

Yiwarra Kuju / One Road

Running nearly 2000 kilometres through Western Australia, the Canning Stock Route is the longest stock route in the world. And since 2006, Indigenous Australians from WA's Mid-West, Pilbara, and Kimberley region have been sharing their stories about this region through the Canning Stock Route Project. [more inside]
posted by barnacles on Jan 31, 2012 - 14 comments

Mi-ss-i-ss-i-pp-i

StateTable:  US/Canada  states, provinces,  territories and minor possessions as CSV, SQL, HTML form elements, PHP arrays, and more. All the countries in the world, as a text list, CSV and API (from the very handy and open Factual).
Also: FreeMapTools, including “how far can I travel from any point on the Earth in a certain time, using a form of ground transportation?”, and “If I dug a tunnel straight through the planet, where should I emerge?” (previously)
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jan 27, 2012 - 11 comments

Ultramapping pinterest blog collects great maps

Ultramapping - outstanding and cool maps of all types, collected at Sha Hwang's Pinterest pinboard.
posted by LobsterMitten on Jan 25, 2012 - 12 comments

Come up to my loft, I'll show you my cartographs.

Maps! Maps are great. And Cartophile is a pretty great blog about maps, courtesy our own desjardins, via mefi projects.
posted by cortex on Jan 24, 2012 - 20 comments

The Digital Blue Ridge Parkway

Driving through Time features roughly 2700 photographs and 76 interactive maps of the Blue Ridge Parkway. The website allows students, researchers, and digital tourists to uncover hidden stories, hear forgotten voices, and understand the often wrenching choices that the construction and preservation of a scenic parkway in a populated region have necessarily entailed. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Jan 22, 2012 - 4 comments

Borderlines

"Countries are defined by the lines that divide them. But how are those lines decided — and why are some of them so strange? Borderlines [a New York Times column by Frank Jacobs of Strange Maps] explores the stories behind the global map, one line at a time." The latest in the series: "The Loneliness of the Guyanas," and the inaugural essay, "In Praise of Borders."
posted by ocherdraco on Jan 17, 2012 - 17 comments

Mapstalgia - video game maps drawn from memory

Mapstalgia - video game maps drawn from memory [via mefi projects, MetaTalk, and Cortex]
posted by The Devil Tesla on Jan 13, 2012 - 10 comments

WebGL-only (no plugins!) 3D map

Nokia's 100% WebGL 3D map [SLBrowserToy]
posted by spitefulcrow on Jan 5, 2012 - 26 comments

History on a delayed live feed

RealTimeWWII live tweets hourly events from the Second World War, delayed by 70 years. Charles Darwin writes entries in his diary as he travels the world a century earlier onboard The Beagle. The 1940 Chronicle covers events of the Battle of Britain as they happened day by day. For those more inclined to peripateticism, HistoryPin (previously) overlays historical imagery on modern scenes in Google Street View. If you'd like a perspective on your own activities in much shorter timeframe, TimeHop shows you what you were doing a year ago.
Semi-Related: 100 best blogs for your liberal arts education.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jan 4, 2012 - 5 comments

The Greatest Paper Map of the United States You’ll Ever See

"American mapmaking’s most prestigious honor is the “Best of Show” award at the annual competition of the Cartography and Geographic Information Society. The five most recent winners were all maps designed by large, well-known institutions: National Geographic (three times), the Central Intelligence Agency Cartography Center, and the U.S. Census Bureau. But earlier this year, the 38th annual Best of Show award went to a map created by Imus Geographics—which is basically one dude named David Imus working in a farmhouse outside Eugene, Ore." Slate profile on the map and award. Interview with David Imus on OregonLive.com. Book about the map (43MB PDF) YouTube interview with David Imus.
posted by NotMyselfRightNow on Jan 3, 2012 - 26 comments

Ride With GPS

"Ride With GPS is the best bike route mapping tool for cyclists, runners or anyone wanting an easy yet powerful fitness route planning experience. We offer tools to analyze cycling performance, including graphs of heart rate, cadence, watts (power output from a power meter), speed and elevation gain. Using all this data, we can offer training plans and other insight into your fitness. We work with all Garmin Edge bike computers, Forerunner fitness devices and any GPS unit that can export a TCX or GPX file."
posted by troll on Dec 22, 2011 - 20 comments

Beautiful maps of New York City, from the 1600s to present

The Streets of New York : a cartographical exploration. Part II - 19th Century Expansion and Part III - The Three Dimensional Maps (a must see for the last picture, a scale model with 895,000 structures). More amazing pictures of the Panorama of the City of New York
posted by desjardins on Dec 19, 2011 - 8 comments

Daytrippers

Vacations, diversions and roadtrips: On The Way suggests attractions and reststops for any route. The Weekend Map shows events and activities for 27 American cities for the coming weekend. Nerdy Day Trips (previously) suggests trips for geeks of all kinds, while Trazzler suggests daytrips for where you live. Don't have a car? Mapnificent (previously) shows you where you can get to from any point in a given time using public transit. EveryTrail suggests walks, rambles, strolls and hikes. Google's new HotelFinder service locates places to stay in a sketched area on a map, with a range of options. via
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Dec 14, 2011 - 7 comments

Come and see for yourself ...

On Monday, Google released Memories for the Future, a website that allows you to "... walk the scarred coastline [after the Japanese tsunami] virtually". "... it is possible to see the full extent of the damage by finding an image in Street View and then clicking the “Before” and “After” links at the top to see how the earthquake and tsunami impacted that area." The Japan Real Time blog has a good introduction and writeup.
posted by woodblock100 on Dec 13, 2011 - 9 comments

Ark of the Covenant: 2½-1½-1½ Cubits

Maps of Biblical Prophecy and History. Also Protestant distribution, oil pipelines, Mars, and more.
posted by Winnemac on Dec 10, 2011 - 14 comments

Education For All

The 2011 Edublog Awards are on. The nominee lists provide rich resources for everyone, perhaps most especially in the free web tool category. A personal selection: Online Convert (free online conversion of dozens of video formats), GeoTrio and TripLine (recorded tours around the world), CorkboardMe and LinoIt (online, shared pibboards), Cover It Live (online event presentation) and A Google A Day (daily questions and puzzles, presented by Google (previously)). For kids, there’s Artsonia (the world’s largest children’s arts museum) Tarheel Reader (illustrated readers for multiple platforms) and SweetSearch (a search engine for students),along with much, much more. [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Dec 5, 2011 - 1 comment

See you at the corner of West 15,903rd and South 14,437th St.

Harold Cooper’s Extend New York takes New York City to extremes, by extrapolating every street and avenue of the Manhattan grid to whole planet. What subway line stops at your front door, wherever you are? Why do all Avenues terminate in Shaytankuduk?
posted by migurski on Nov 14, 2011 - 19 comments

What Are These Mysterious Lines In China's Desert?

Some Google Earth enthusiasts have found a strange and unexplainable grid pattern in the middle of China's Gobi Desert.
posted by reenum on Nov 14, 2011 - 70 comments

“If I have a little money I buy books; and if any is left, I buy food and clothes.”

Books seen in new ways: the Book Drum World Map (popular books mapped to their locations, and more). The Infinite Helical Bookcase. CodexCloud (store, search and share your eBooks online). Also: galleries and blogs of unique bookshelves, Bookshelf Porn and BookPorn. [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Nov 10, 2011 - 5 comments

GPS Artwork in Southeast Baltimore

GPX riding is a general term for using a GPS device to track and record location while riding a bicycle [previously on MetaFilter]. Combining this technology with a planned effort to create art is the premise behind Wallygpx. Think of the images as being akin to a giant etch-a-sketch.
posted by netbros on Nov 9, 2011 - 8 comments

An MBTA Business Day

What does a day's worth of activity look like for Boston's transportation system? Via bostonography, which has been featured previously.
posted by Eideteker on Nov 8, 2011 - 26 comments

Earth Time

Google Earth Clock is a digital clock assembled from views of the planet that resemble numbers. (Not for the vertiginous; requires the Google Earth plugin). [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Oct 27, 2011 - 5 comments

Mapping Baltimore's Addiction

On the Trail of Addiction (Baltimore)
posted by josher71 on Oct 25, 2011 - 20 comments

The global reach of social networks

Social network popularity around the world in 2011 as determined by Google search statistics. [more inside]
posted by OverlappingElvis on Oct 21, 2011 - 22 comments

Warhammer maps galore

The Super Huge, Detailed Map of the Warhammer Old World is exactly what it claims to be. 29952 by 22528 pixels in size, it covers all of the Old World area of the Warhammer Fantasy setting. The map was made by Gitzman, who has made lots of other maps of the Warhammer Fantasy world, hosts a WFRPG podcast and has a bunch of other resources to help game masters and players in that setting. He had help from Andreas Blicher, whose site has even more maps of the Old World, and Alfred Nunez jr., who has even more maps, articles and resources for people interested in the Warhammer Fantasy universe.
posted by Kattullus on Oct 20, 2011 - 57 comments

Ballard Geocoded

A map of the locations in JG Ballard's fiction. Click a marker on the map to read the relevant text.
posted by jack_mo on Oct 14, 2011 - 18 comments

Temperature and Rainfall Around the World

Climate Wizard enables you to access leading climate change information and visualize the impacts anywhere on Earth. This web-based program allows you to choose a state or country and both assess how climate has changed over time and project what future changes are predicted to occur in a given area.
posted by netbros on Sep 23, 2011 - 7 comments

Still icier than all of Brick Squad

The Guardian recently reported that, according to the 2011 edition of the Times Atlas, a new island called Uunartoq Qeqertaq has emerged off the coast of Greenland due to a 15% loss in glacial cover since 1999. However, glaciologists were quick to point out that this was deeply improbable. Ejo Schrama, a professor at TU Delft whose research interests include satellite mapping of Greenland, has posted a copy of a letter subscribed by several scientists at the Scott Polar Research Insititute expressing displeasure/disgruntlement with the publishers of the atlas (the linked post has been continually updated as events have warranted, so keep an eye out). The publishers have issued a semi-apologetic statement, but why was the mistake made in the first place? ScienceInsider thinks they might have worked out the answer (see the update in the second half of the article).
posted by Dim Siawns on Sep 23, 2011 - 31 comments

Creed Crusher, or Spiritual Mill for Pulverizing Creeds &C.

Creed Crusher, or Spiritual Mill for Pulverizing Creeds &C. is an 1867 poster by Dr. T. L. Lewis. In it, a pair of cherubs grind the religious and educational institutions of 19th-century against a an allegorical globe of philosophy dominated by the Great Ocean of Spiritualism. Below, Lewis quotes himself no less than four times. Similarly weird is the anthropomorphic map of Europe by Schmidt. (Both via the Big Map Blog previously)
posted by KirkJobSluder on Sep 13, 2011 - 25 comments

What is food-grade concrete?

Architectural theorist David Gissen has recently been travelling through France to learn about wine. His dedicated Twitter account @100aocs has attracted the attention of sommeliers, importers, and winemakers. Edible Geography caught up with Gissen to discuss wine, wine culture, geography, and Gissen's re-thought wine map of France based on Metro maps such as London's Tube map. How Wine Became Metropolitan: An Interview with David Gissen.
posted by shakespeherian on Sep 8, 2011 - 9 comments

Jerry's Map

Jerry's Map: a short film about the fictional world of Jerry Gretzinger, which he has been building for decades through a process of procedural cartography. His website.
posted by avocet on Aug 24, 2011 - 20 comments

Sandiego?

"Looking at the world through via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. Today's entry is a puzzle. We're challenging you to figure out where in the world each of the images below is taken. (You'll find answers and links at the bottom of the entry.) North is not always up in these pictures, and, apart from a bit of contrast, they are unaltered images provided by Google and its mapping partners. So I invite you to open up Google Earth (or Google Maps), have a look at the images below, and dive in. Good luck!"
posted by vidur on Aug 3, 2011 - 22 comments

So that's what all the Mario 2 levels look like...

NES Maps - for when you have to see exactly how that level of Zelda looks in an overworld view. Complete with full maps, background only maps, or sprites for your perusal. Complete with character names and title cards for most maps. You can even get one to hang on your wall to map out your conquests in Hyrule. Even more maps from VG Maps from a previous posting.
posted by deezil on Aug 1, 2011 - 8 comments

Map Kaleidoscope

Rorschmap slices and reflects images from Google Maps, creating kaleidoscopic cartography. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Jul 30, 2011 - 19 comments

Hey, you've got your maps in my art!

Maps that make you smile, maps that make you look fashionable and maps that keep you warm.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Jul 21, 2011 - 9 comments

Twitter/Flickr usage maps of the world

Ever wondered where Flickr and Twitter are used the most? Eric Fischer (previously, previouslier, previousliest) has created a new set of maps comparing geotagged Flickr images to geotagged Twitter posts.
posted by spitefulcrow on Jul 14, 2011 - 23 comments

Africa: History, Cartography and Exploration

Evolution of the Map of Africa [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 7, 2011 - 15 comments

The History of Cartography

Free PDFs of The History of Cartography, vol. 1 and 2, from University of Chicago Press.
posted by Stan Carey on Jul 3, 2011 - 13 comments

Time Cube, 1893

MAP OF THE SQUARE AND STATIONARY EARTH. Send 25 Cents to the Author, Prof. Orlando Ferguson, for a book explaining this Square and Stationary Earth. It Knocks the Globe Theory Clean Out. It will Teach You How to Foretell Eclipses. It is Worth Its Weight in Gold.
posted by Faint of Butt on Jun 27, 2011 - 48 comments

See Different

The world is not as you think it is. While every map system has its faults, the Mercator we all know was designed for ship navigation five centuries ago, and introduces significant geographical distortion. Alternative projection systems, including perspective-cylindrical, pseudo-cylindrical and conic, attempt to portray correct relative size, accuracy of features, and position. Inverted maps diminish natural tendencies to see countries at the top as "superior". [more inside]
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jun 11, 2011 - 61 comments

The Newspaper Map

The Newspaper Map: browse thousands of local, regional and national newspapers from around the world, based on geographical location. Filter and translate languages, see newspaper archives back to the early 19th century, and find fourth estate Twitter and YouTube feeds. A mobile version is also available. via
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Jun 7, 2011 - 7 comments

And the winner for highest pedestrian danger index goes to... Orlando!

Dangerous by Design: an interactive map of pedestrian fatalities in the United States "From 2000 to 2009, 47,700 pedestrians were killed in the United States, the equivalent of a jumbo jet full of passengers crashing roughly every month." How the U.S. Builds Roads that Kill Pedestrians
posted by desjardins on Jun 1, 2011 - 60 comments

Turf Grass Capital of the World

Weed like to welcome you, and other fun city slogans in a Google Map. (via Andrew Sullivan)
posted by dry white toast on May 25, 2011 - 26 comments

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