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I think I can see my house from here...

Trulia Hindsight merges real estate data showing the year properties were built with animated maps (US Only). Search for your town by name; here's mine.
posted by oneirodynia on May 29, 2007 - 10 comments

Walking the streets of Google

The most amazing Google thing in awhile launched today. Walk the streets of New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Denver, and Miami using Google's new Street View. You can look and move in any direction, and the detail is good enough to read license plates. It is getting lots of attention, though it makes some people a little afraid and has others scrambling. [Requires Flash. Click on the city names, really, it is worth it.]
posted by blahblahblah on May 29, 2007 - 107 comments

share your part of the world

Waymarking.com provides tools for you to catalog, mark­ and visit interesting and useful locations around the world. It's a fun site, packed with photographs, information and maps; a useful resource and tool for GeoCaching and other interests. Among the various categories included is Oddball Museums: The Glore Psychiatric Museum, Musee Mechanique, The National Plastics Museum with lots of great pics and links to other sites, Museum of Burlesque [nsfw], The Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum, Orange Show, wbur Museums of Dirt, Plumbing, Antiquated Technology, Lizzie Borden and more oddities.
posted by nickyskye on May 26, 2007 - 5 comments

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps

Since 1867, Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps have been used to assess fire insurance liability in United States cities. With their high level of detail and color-coding to indicate the materials used to construct the buildings, the maps have since become invaluable tools to historians, urban planners, preservationists, and genealogists. A few collections of cities and states have been digitized and made available online: Utah, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida to name a few.
posted by marxchivist on May 24, 2007 - 16 comments

Database of Terror Attacks

The Global Terrorism Database is now available online. It includes information on more than 27,000 bombings, 13,000 assassinations, and 2,800 kidnappings. With 2D and 3D georeferences for some incidents. The interactive map isn't working for me though.
posted by tellurian on May 24, 2007 - 18 comments

The boundary stones of Washington DC.

The boundary stones of Washington DC.
posted by Wolfdog on May 9, 2007 - 52 comments

Here There Be Anthropomorphic Dragons

What if all the online communities were drawn on a map? Here's what it might look like. I guess we are off the world's end though.
posted by ShawnString on May 2, 2007 - 45 comments

James Niehues: Ski Resort Trail Map Painter

"First of all, it's a map; second, it's a piece of art." Look closely at the corner of a North American ski resort trail map and you will probably see James Niehues' name tucked away in the trees. Examples of his work include Alta, Snow Basin, Winter Park, Killington and Vail.
posted by mmascolino on Apr 28, 2007 - 17 comments

Get Down With The Sickness.

Who's feeling sick? Probably a whole lot of people around you by the looks of this service, which tracks illness around the country as people report their symptoms. Mostly US and European-centric at this stage, but as more people around the world report their symptoms that can begin to change.
posted by Effigy2000 on Apr 26, 2007 - 16 comments

Map of maps, timeline of timelines

Milestones in graphics, maps, and visualizations. An incredible site for anyone interested in the history of visualization of data. See the first town map from 6200 BCE. Take a look at some of the most important graphics through history, including the London cholera map and the diagrams that made Florence Nightingale's case, as well as recent examples of some of the worst. Also check out the fascinating history of timelines, or Cabinet magazine's beautifully illustrated Timeline of Timelines.
posted by blahblahblah on Apr 24, 2007 - 13 comments

The Objective Orbiting Eye in the Sky

Live, From Outer Space: rural fires [1, 2], The Haze in China [1 ,2, 3] and its movement, aerosols, and the brothers carbon monoxide [a photochemical smog agent] and carbon dioxide.
posted by trinarian on Apr 14, 2007 - 10 comments

The Book of Curiosities

For anyone with even a passing interest in Islamic history or cartography, 'The Book of Curiosities of the Sciences and Marvels for the Eyes' site at Oxford University's Bodleian Library will provide a thoroughly interesting timesink. This recently discovered 13th/14th century copy of an 11th century Egyptian manuscript was partly based on Ptolemy and includes the oldest rectangular map of the world...not to mention the famed human-bearing Waq-Waq tree. [via]
posted by peacay on Apr 5, 2007 - 7 comments

Keep On Googlin'

Mother Roads. You can now customize Google maps to add commentary, photos, audio, and video. creating your own annotated maps. The linked example is a collection of oral histories of Route 66; look around for Olympic Host Cities, Monster Sightings, and more.
posted by Miko on Apr 5, 2007 - 22 comments

I can see your house from here

The Geograph British Isles project aims to collect geographically representative photographs and information for every square kilometre of the UK and the Republic of Ireland. It also tells you what's unique about Beast Cliff.
posted by Abiezer on Apr 4, 2007 - 20 comments

Printed Ephemera

Civil War Posters, Soviet Children's Books, 19th Century Shipping Posters, and much, much more are all part of this Flickr user's amazing collection of printed ephemera.
posted by jonson on Mar 31, 2007 - 13 comments

Bad news: you have to leave your car on the other side of the Atlantic.

Long Wharf in Boston and European route E5 are now stops on convenient routes for anyone looking to save a little money on airfare. Whether you're heading from Newfoundland to England or Moscow to Alaska, Google Maps recommends these places as (literal) jumping-off points. Just remember to pack your goggles.
posted by CrunchyFrog on Mar 29, 2007 - 13 comments

Australian indigenous maps

Interactive Atlas of Indigenous Australia. (Java) "Choose from a range of maps covering historical, social, cultural, political and environmental themes."
posted by dhruva on Mar 27, 2007 - 4 comments

Here Be Dragons

Rebel cartography, postmodern art, or political statement? Nikolas Schiller makes art from satellite/flyover images.
posted by kyleg on Mar 26, 2007 - 6 comments

Map collection of the Boston Public Library

The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library has 200,000 historic maps and 5,000 atlases. A whole heap of them is online in very high resolution and you can explore the collection by location, subject, date, publisher, author and projection. They give virtual tours, select a map of the month and have a section called Maps in the News, where they profile Darfur and Iraq.
posted by Kattullus on Mar 19, 2007 - 8 comments

Hospital Closures in NYC

A Google Map mash-up shows how hospital closures in NYC disproportionately effect the poor and people of colour. It's a pretty slick presentation of the data.
posted by chunking express on Mar 1, 2007 - 36 comments

Imaginary Homelands

Imaginary places in detail: Start with a wonderful overview of megastructures in science fiction and examine a dictionary of 76 locations from recent fantasy novels. Then move on to the interactive maps: Mordor, Narnia, the Simpson's Springfield, England as seen in many stories, New York in fiction, Lovecraft's New England, maps from almost any video game, Star Trek, the Marvel Universe, and the DC Universe.
posted by blahblahblah on Feb 21, 2007 - 29 comments

Dickens' London

An Interactive Map of Charles Dickens' London. After you have had a chance to peruse the map, see then and now pictures or take a quiz about Dickens' London. If you want to see it with your own eyes, take a walking tour. Or if you are daring enough, you can try to virtually survive Dickens' London.
posted by dios on Feb 14, 2007 - 7 comments

trace your route in red

Murder Map Mashup: New York, Boston, Baltimore, and New Orleans have all mapped Google to murder.
posted by four panels on Feb 13, 2007 - 25 comments

Google Maps to include NYC subway stops and building outlines

a Google Maps view of NYC, centered on Central Park Google Maps has started displaying subway stops (with the names of the lines that serve each each stop) in New York City. Clearly this is a work in progress (full building outlines are available only in some parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn, and some subway stops currently list only one of the multiple trains that serve the stop). Still, this is excellent news not only for natives but also for tourists (whose only subway-map reference may be the significantly, sometimes radically "not to scale" version put out by the MTA).
posted by allterrainbrain on Feb 9, 2007 - 46 comments

map art

Here are three artists who use maps in their art: Mathew Cusick makes collages of old maps, Layla Curtis makes collages of current maps (flash; click on works, collages) and Susan Stockwell makes maps out of, well, just about anything.
posted by dhruva on Jan 24, 2007 - 14 comments

Destruction as creation.

"Georgia Russell is a Scottish artist who uses a scalpel instead of a brush or a pen. She works with obsessive perserverance to create constructions that transform found ephemera, such as books, music scores, maps, newspapers, currency and photographs." Samples here. {via design dna}
posted by dobbs on Jan 16, 2007 - 18 comments

3,000 casualties

Where They Came From A map depicting the point of origin, of solders killed in Iraq.
posted by nola on Jan 10, 2007 - 34 comments

Top 10 Mashups Hispanos de Google Maps

Top 10 Spanish Mashups of Google Maps Found on a great blog about maps: Tecnomaps.
posted by jlori on Jan 5, 2007 - 11 comments

Projekt "Map"

Das Projekt "Map"
posted by Tlogmer on Dec 1, 2006 - 18 comments

Walk It

Walk It is a website for planning walking journeys. It gives you a map and directions for the best route, and info on distance, walking time, calorie burn and even CO2 potentially saved by avoiding the car, taxi or bus. London only, at present, alas.
posted by nthdegx on Nov 7, 2006 - 21 comments

French Mapping etc

The Mapmaker's Wife tells the extraordinary story of Isabel Godin, the first woman to travel down the length of the Amazon. Her journey brought an end to the first scientific expedition to the New World, which was led by Charles Marie de La Condamine.
posted by dhruva on Nov 2, 2006 - 12 comments

'Neighboroo is the easiest way to learn about neighborhoods.'

neighboroo!
posted by jne1813 on Oct 26, 2006 - 20 comments

Your statistics, on your terms!

Ever wondered how your state stacks up? Well, with this nifty tool, you can decide how the next revision should read! Also check out the state-by-state version!
posted by TheNewWazoo on Oct 23, 2006 - 19 comments

Printed matter

Printed Matter "Markus Dressen has taken the power of Google Maps towards a showcase of illumined manuscripts, Bauhaus design, and medieval whimsy"
posted by dhruva on Oct 23, 2006 - 6 comments

5,000 Years in 90 Seconds

The Imperial History of the Middle East is a flash based map of the Middle East, with a sliding timeline showing the various forces that have established dominance in the region over the last 5,000 years. Just one of many interesting interactive demonstrations over at Maps Of War.
posted by jonson on Oct 2, 2006 - 33 comments

Breathing Earth

Breathing Earth. A map of the world showing a real-time simulation of the CO2 emissions level of every country in the world, as well as each countries birth and death rates.
posted by stbalbach on Sep 15, 2006 - 24 comments

A digital atlas of the new towns of Edward I

Mapping Medieval Townscapes: a digital atlas of the new towns of Edward I For each town you will find maps and images, as well as historical interpretation, bibliographical information, and access through to a geographical database. (The fancy interactive maps are especially good.) Warning: you'll have to click to agree to some terms and conditions before you can view the site.
posted by jack_mo on Sep 6, 2006 - 6 comments

What's your position?

Do you know where you are? With Google Maps and Google Earth so commonplace now, GPS everywhere, and with websites such as our own Metafilter making use of latitude and longitude did you ever stop to think about how all this latitude, longitude and height above sea level works? The UK's Ordnance Survey explains it all in A Guide to Coordinate Systems in Great Britain. Discover that different coordinate systems might differ by as much as 200m, and that your house may be moving as much as 1m up and down each day relative to the centre of the Earth, and many other bits of geographical interest.[more inside]
posted by edd on Sep 6, 2006 - 4 comments

The ties that bind

The International Networks Archive is an effort by a group of sociologists to understand 2,000 years of globalization through mapping the network of transactions that link the world, rather than geography. The project is still ongoing, but you can see some of the results: an interactive map that uses travel time to visualize the world; a graphic of the growth of Starbucks and McDonalds; the distribution of government jobs (apparently the 3,412 postal inspectors can carry firearms); the cashflows of movies and tobacco; and, of course, the world at night. There is also access to a lot of detailed data, as well as more maps and information at the Mapping Globalization wiki.
posted by blahblahblah on Aug 22, 2006 - 5 comments

CensusScope: graphical and tabular display of US Census 2000 data

CensusScope. US Census 2000 data displayed through maps, rankings, and charts. [more inside] Warning: some pages render funny, but usable, under Firefox 1.5.0.4.
posted by Slithy_Tove on Aug 18, 2006 - 7 comments

Rendezvous 2.0?

Google Video + Google Maps + Rendezvous = Awesome Its been posted previously, but now with a map illustrating the route taken in real-time.
posted by lemonfridge on Aug 18, 2006 - 26 comments

Google Maps Flight Sim

Google Maps flight simulator. Well, not a simulator so much. But surprisingly good fun. Flash.
posted by Jimbob on Aug 5, 2006 - 25 comments

3D Starmaps

3D Starmaps by Winchell Chung. (I knew him for his game illustrations before I ever knew about his starmaps.) The site contains lots of information about how to make 2D/3D starmaps from standard star tables, a nice selection of pre-existing maps and one of the best listings of 3D starmap software around.
posted by jiawen on Jul 23, 2006 - 12 comments

Who'll be living where in 25-years?

Who'll be living where. Researchers at the Earth Institute at Columbia University have developed map that projects where people will be living in the year 2025.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 21, 2006 - 36 comments

A Noble Spirit Embiggens The Smallest Man.

Check out this map of The Simpson's hometown of Springfield. We may never know what state the town is located in, and yes, the show has sucked for at least six years now (if not more) but this map was considered to be so good, it was, apparently, added to the Harvard Map collection. Comic Book Guy would be proud.
posted by Effigy2000 on Jul 20, 2006 - 53 comments

I can label my house from here.

If you want to see all the interesting stuff hidden in Google Maps then you need look no further than a site like Google Sightseeing, but what about the other way around? If you've ever wished Google Maps was better labeled then Wikimapia might be what you're looking for.
posted by Mr.Encyclopedia on Jul 19, 2006 - 29 comments

Antique Celestial Maps

The U.S. Naval Observatory Library features high-res scans of images from antique books dealing with astronomy and navigation. Wallpapers, ahoy!
posted by Gator on Jul 13, 2006 - 18 comments

He's got the whole world...

Hans Rosling is on a mission (flash video). The founder of Gapminder (previously discussed here) gives an inspired talk about the third world, while turning statistics into beautiful graphics. Of course, the folks at Google are already all over this.
posted by neurodoc on Jun 29, 2006 - 15 comments

Gutenkarte

Gutenkarte: "Gutenkarte is a geographic text browser, intended to help readers explore the spatial component of classic works of literature. Gutenkarte downloads public domain texts from Project Gutenberg, and then feeds them to MetaCarta's GeoParser API, which extracts and returns all the geographic locations it can find." [note: works in Firefox but not IE, for me.]
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken on Jun 25, 2006 - 16 comments

Fantastical Cartography

Manhattan Goes Travelling
posted by Tlogmer on Jun 2, 2006 - 22 comments

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