Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

665 posts tagged with medicine. (View popular tags)
Displaying 551 through 600 of 665. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (164)
+ (141)
+ (57)
+ (53)
+ (49)
+ (47)
+ (45)
+ (40)
+ (36)
+ (35)
+ (32)
+ (29)
+ (28)
+ (28)
+ (27)
+ (26)
+ (25)
+ (24)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (21)
+ (20)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)


Users that often use this tag:
zarq (61)
homunculus (47)
Gyan (12)
kliuless (10)
Blasdelb (10)
Kattullus (7)
Blazecock Pileon (7)
reenum (7)
nickyskye (6)
StrikeTheViol (6)
mediareport (5)
jason's_planet (5)
daksya (4)
escabeche (4)
mrgrimm (4)
Foci for Analysis (4)
amyms (4)
hat_eater (4)
latkes (4)
Danf (3)
skallas (3)
amberglow (3)
Pretty_Generic (3)
madamjujujive (3)
phrontist (3)
troutfishing (3)
Rumple (3)
infini (3)
scrump (3)
scblackman (3)
T.D. Strange (3)
East Manitoba Regi... (3)
ocherdraco (3)
Potomac Avenue (3)
Slarty Bartfast (2)
AceRock (2)
jeffburdges (2)
brundlefly (2)
Sticherbeast (2)
thirteenkiller (2)
ThePinkSuperhero (2)
Mr_Zero (2)
blendor (2)
grapefruitmoon (2)
dhruva (2)
OmieWise (2)
The White Hat (2)
bigmusic (2)
jtron (2)
marxchivist (2)
ikkyu2 (2)
Paragon (2)
The Jesse Helms (2)
fenriq (2)
dmd (2)
digaman (2)
iffley (2)
alms (2)
TedW (2)
WolfDaddy (2)

Big heads wobbling on wee necks?....

Nootropics ("smart" drugs) - all wish to be smarter, correct ? And - while exercise, nutrition, learning, travel, and social interaction (the last 3 via release of neurotrophins) effectively do this, Nootropic drugs have been researched since the 1950's and have been shown to cause at least short term cognitive function enhancement. Piracetam, the first of this drugs, shows promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's and Attention deficit Disorder. Alas, as with poor little Algernon, the effect seems temporary. Nootropics can be a little difficult to acquire in the US. Beer is not a nootropic, but sex on the other hand.....
posted by troutfishing on Mar 5, 2004 - 20 comments

Pancakes: Is there anything they can't do?

Pancakes! Not just your everyday pancakes this time though. Alan Clark has turned his family recipe into a c13 isotope lased medical breakthrough. - via Fark (of course)
posted by KnitWit on Dec 8, 2003 - 9 comments

We'd give money if they had more clocks

"They do not use Western means to tell time. They use the sun. These drugs have to be administered in certain sequences, at certain times during the day. You say, take it at 10 o'clock, they say, what do you mean, 10 o'clock?" They, of course, refers to "Africans" and the above logic from the head of USAID was used an explanation for why it's tough to extend AIDS treatment to Africa. The only problem with this argument is that it's wrong. People with HIV in developing countries are in better compliance with drug regimes than in the US as new research is showing [RealAudio]. As we've seen throughout the epidemic, it's a lot easier to get funding for researchers in lab coats than for actual treatment . . .
posted by donovan on Dec 1, 2003 - 1 comment

Seven hot technologies

Seven hot technologies that we'll soon see on the market, according to MIT's Tech Review magazine. The spam blocker sounds like it might work. But the babelfish?
posted by iffley on Nov 30, 2003 - 14 comments

FDA halts adult stem cell procedure

The FDA has put the brakes on clinical trials of a promising form of stem cell therapy which uses the body's own stem cells to heal dammage. The procedure was used earlier this year to heal the heart of a teenager who was shot in the heart by a nail gun. Other research is being done with the body's own stem cells on the heart and the spinal cord, and new ways to produce large numbers of adult stem cells have been discovered by MIT and the British company TriStem. With the controversy over embryonic stem cells, I'm glad that adult stem cell therapy is showing promise. [Some links via FuturePundit, who is rather annoyed with the FDA.]
posted by homunculus on Nov 29, 2003 - 11 comments

Examining Bush's stem cell policy, two years later.

Examining Bush's stem cell policy, two years later. Kinsley: Put it all together, and the stem cells that can squeeze through Bush's loopholes are far less promising than they seemed two years ago, while the general promise of embryonic stem cells burns brighter than ever. If you claim to have made an anguished moral decision, and the factual basis for that decision turns out to be faulty, you ought to reconsider or your claim to moral anguish looks phony. But Bush's moral anguish was suspect from the beginning, because the policy it produced makes no sense.
posted by skallas on Oct 25, 2003 - 1 comment

Granny kept it for medicinal purposes only

SCOTUS supports state medical-weed laws "The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a Justice Department effort to punish doctors in Washington and other states for recommending marijuana or even discussing the drug's benefits with their patients." (from google news)
posted by jfuller on Oct 15, 2003 - 7 comments

Half century in an iron lung.

Half century in an iron lung. Actually, its not really, but there's still plenty in this story to make you wince.
posted by biffa on Oct 14, 2003 - 10 comments

Painkillers destroy hearing

Painkillers destroy hearing - Looks like America's fascination with Vicodin, Oxycotin, and other hardcore painkillers has a lasting effect other than addiction. Studies are showing that "rapid hearing loss, even deafness, in some patients who are misusing the drugs". This is serious enough for Vicodin's manufacturer to add a "warning about the potential for hearing loss to the drug's label."

Is Rush Limbaugh's sudden deafness and recent involvement in a painkiller drug investigation simply a coincidence?
posted by Argyle on Oct 3, 2003 - 38 comments

Excuse me while I go pass out.

Surgery without anesthesia is something most of us are glad is now a relic of the past, but yoga teacher Yonah Offner decided it was a great opportunity to demonstrate the benefits of practicing Pranayama.
posted by 4easypayments on Sep 17, 2003 - 8 comments

Synthetic Nerves

Synthetic Nerves, the site lists a couple of applications any other ideas? I want my computer enhanced brain, and a running video dump in several spectrums.
posted by sourbrew on Sep 10, 2003 - 3 comments

Nirmal Hriday

Sick on the Inside. Published in Harper's August 2003 issue but not online, the full text of Wil S. Hylton's exposure of the medical conditions in United States prisons has been put on the web by the Wrongful Death Institute with the author's permission. The gravity of the situation for more than 2 million people behind bars can hardly be exaggerated.
"We have almost 30 percent of our prison population in Texas infected with hepatitis. That’s not so different from the numbers you see in the Dark Ages with the plague."
...
"[Correctional Medical Services] is an HMO with a captive audience," says David Santacroce, the professor who is spearheading the Michigan lawsuit. "The fewer patients they treat, the more money they make."
[more inside]
posted by Eloquence on Sep 1, 2003 - 11 comments

Impaled by an 18 Inch Drill Bit

Man Impaled on Drill Bit but he's actually going to be alright although he lost one eye. There is a pic on the link of the X-ray shot showing an 18 inch long, 1 1/2 inch wide drill bit going straight through his skull. No brain damage, no paralysis and his nephew is already joking about how he'll be popping out his glass eye at parties. Amazing!
posted by fenriq on Aug 30, 2003 - 30 comments

father of the year

Two of his children dying from a rare genetic disorder, Dad -- with no science background whatever -- starts a biotech company for the sole purpose of developing a drug that will cure them. Heartrending conflicts ensue. "Many times, I'd be talking aloud about programs and budgets, and at the back of my mind be thinking, 'Oh my God, this is not good for Megan and Patrick.' "
posted by stupidsexyFlanders on Aug 26, 2003 - 25 comments

Trans Ova Genetics: Pharming Cows

In lieu of today's posts on GM foods and meat, Trans Ova Genetics is pharming cows in hopes of creating one capable of adminstering human antibodies.
posted by hobbes on Aug 25, 2003 - 5 comments

The Public Library Of Science

The Public Library of Science has been getting some good press lately. An Editorial at the Sacramento Bee, The New Scientist, Washington Post and The Boston Globe, have all written up The PLoS, the organization founded by a Nobel Prize-winning biologist and two colleagues, is plotting the overthrow of the system by which scientific results are made known to the world -- a $9 billion publishing juggernaut with subscription charges that range into thousands of dollars per year.
They are committed to making the world's scientific and medical literature a freely available public resource. Check it out at publiclibraryofscience.org.
posted by Blake on Aug 19, 2003 - 5 comments

9 abstracts down, 11,999,991 abstracts left to go.

Duct tape. Celebrity worship. Webbed penii. The obvious. Memory and castration. Kroger store-brand pasta sauce. Killer pancakes.

No matter what you're looking for, you'll probably find something interesting in the absolutely free 12 million article database, PubMed. Warning: may cause addiction.
posted by LimePi on Aug 10, 2003 - 15 comments

And they work how exactly?

Anxious? Depressed? - you need more brain cells. Just take one of these twice a day. New research shows that antidepressants may not work as we thought at all, rather they actually stimulate growth of cells in the hippocampus area of the brain. This may all be for the good - but it seems strange that we release millions of happy pills and market them as safe without knowing for sure what they do. Perhaps its the money talking.
posted by grahamwell on Aug 9, 2003 - 75 comments

In 1956, Dr. Werner Forssman was awarded The Nobel Prize

Human cardiac catheterization was introduced by Werner Forssman in 1929. Ignoring his department chief, and tying his assistant to an operating table to prevent her interference, he placed a ureteral catheter into a vein in his arm, advanced it to the right atrium [of his heart], and walked upstairs to the x-ray department where he took the confirmatory x-ray film. In 1956, Dr. Forssman was awarded The Nobel Prize. [via the "fortune" command]
posted by hob on Aug 7, 2003 - 15 comments

Medical Fotolog.

Medical fotolog. [warning -- graphic surgical photos]
posted by monju_bosatsu on Aug 6, 2003 - 15 comments

Take 2 Thorazine & call me in the morning.

The American Gallery of Psychiatric Art. 'Sanity For Sale: 1960-2000'. Magazine advertisements for psychiatric medications in the latter half of the twentieth century.
posted by eyebeam on Jul 23, 2003 - 15 comments

Is that a fly in your pants, or are you just happy to see me?

Doctors baffled as boy explains 'unique' problem. His parents didn't believe him at first, but can you blame them? This is beyond bizarre.
posted by christian on Jul 10, 2003 - 76 comments

Islamic Medical Manuscripts

Marvels of Things Created and Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing An "immensely popular" medieval Islamic natural history text (with simurghs, yew trees, constellations and much more). Found at the Islamic Medical Manuscripts collection, which has more great visuals in the Medical Monographs section.
posted by mediareport on Jun 19, 2003 - 12 comments

No Nature

What's eating Tony Soprano? The emerging field of ecopsychology thinks it may have an answer.
posted by elwoodwiles on Jun 16, 2003 - 3 comments

the killer in you

Welcome to self-policing corporate responsibility. A division of the pharmaceutical company Bayer (Expertise with responsibility) sold millions of dollars of blood-clotting medicine for hemophiliacs - medicine that carried a high risk of transmitting AIDS - to Asia and Latin America in the mid-1980s while selling a new, safer product in the West.
posted by The Jesse Helms on May 22, 2003 - 6 comments

Call the Clone Doctor

Call the Clone Doctor! In the June issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online Panayiotis Zavos announced a group has produced "the first human cloned embryo for reproductive purposes". He is leaving his position as professor of animal sciences in the agriculture department of the University of Kentucky (USA) to join the organization responsible for the embryo. He's no johnny-come-lately -- he stated his plans last year.
posted by ?! on Apr 10, 2003 - 6 comments

Face

All your face are belong to us. 16-yr-old Irish girl looks set to receive the world's first face transplant, it has been reported. Right now it's a medical procedure, but do you think we ever see a day where people grow face replacements for cosmetic purposes?
posted by piskycritter on Apr 7, 2003 - 22 comments

Back Hurts, Brain Shrinks

Back pain causes brain shrinkage. I think a lot of people have back pain, then.
posted by nyxxxx on Mar 22, 2003 - 24 comments

And you thought you only had to worry about pervy dentists

Gynecological exams are changing as new students begin to question old practices. Medical students often perform pelvic exams when the patient is under anesthesia, not only without consent, but without informing them.
posted by Karmakaze on Mar 12, 2003 - 21 comments

Hi honey, I'm home! Guess what!...

Face Transplants : "...the harvesting or ''degloving'' of a face would take approximately two hours, depending on the depth of the excision. It is possible to remove not just skin and subcutaneous fat and muscle but....part of the donor's bone and cartilage as well. Still, the deeper the cut, the more complex becomes the reattachment."
posted by troutfishing on Mar 12, 2003 - 10 comments

A beating heart

A beating heart
Via b3ta.
posted by Mwongozi on Mar 5, 2003 - 29 comments

you drunkards!

Hangover? Not for long! Okay, probably not - heard some commercials for this product on my local sports radio station, and during don imus' radio show... It seems this company is promoting their "dawn808" product which you can take after or during drinking, and it reacts to the chemicals that your liver forms while trying to clean up your blood. fascinating. wonder what happens if you take this, the 48 hour hollywood diet, and some ephedra. at least they're not trying to sell samplers from the 80's.
posted by djspicerack on Mar 5, 2003 - 28 comments

Lets have a rational discussion

Organ donation has become a hot topic on Me Fi lately. Unfortunately, this thread has not spawned the best discussion. But the ethics of organ tansplantation can become difficult. Do donors have the right to specify who gets their organs? If they do, what does that imply for living donors; in other words, are you really volunteering to donate that kidney to your brother? And should we have an opt-in or opt-out system? Most religions approve of organ donation; even Jehovah's Witnesses that do not accept blood transfusions. And of course, the US government is involved, for better or worse. Not everyone thinks organ donation is good. More links here and here.
posted by TedW on Feb 23, 2003 - 42 comments

Unmitigated gall.

Unmitigated gall. The illegal aliens who got two hearts and two lungs for their daughter REFUSED to have any of her organs donated when it was clear she was brain-dead...
posted by MattD on Feb 22, 2003 - 240 comments

What are we so afraid of?

The number of health-related deaths in the United States in 2000 was over 1 million. The United States spends $13.6BN per year on ALL medical research. For $100BN-$200BN could we save 110,000 more people each year from health-related deaths? High end estimates of homelessness put the number around 3.5 million in the United States. For $30,000 each (100B/3.5M) we could house, feed and provide vocational training for every homeless person. Alternatively, we could provide $2,500 per year for insurance to each person without health care.
posted by PigAlien on Jan 27, 2003 - 38 comments

Genomic Art.

Genomic Art. This lies somewhere on an interface between science and art that most never suspected existed. Check out the gallery.
Oh, and don't forget to visit the Randolph Y. Teasely Hospital - Dwayne Medical Center and it's current projects: male pregnancy, designer babies and Clyven, the world's first talking transgenic mouse.
posted by talos on Jan 22, 2003 - 3 comments

Doctor, I've got a clamp... I mean, a cramp...

Doctor, I've got a clamp... I mean, a cramp... Surgical teams accidentally leave clamps, sponges and other tools inside about 1,500 patients nationwide each year, according to the biggest study of the problem yet. (yummy Xray here).
posted by sparky on Jan 16, 2003 - 11 comments

Smallpox Vaccination?

Smallpox Vaccination? The New England Journal of Medicine made available today an early release of articles from their planned January 30, 2003 issue, designed "to help inform the current national debate about smallpox vaccination" [more inside....articles unfortunately available only in PDF....]
posted by fold_and_mutilate on Dec 20, 2002 - 31 comments

Scraping the bottom of the culture of celebrity

More fallout from the Winona trial: Dr Jules Lusman, a 'celebrity doctor' who (over)prescribed painkillers to Winona Ryder, has had his California medical license revoked. 'The Medical Board said Dr Lusman became known in celebrity circles for his willingness to make out-of-hours calls at homes and hotels and write prescriptions for opiates and hypnotic drugs, as well as syringes...' The Smoking Gun has also posted the entire Ryder probation report, which details more sad, depressing facts which surfaced during the trial, including these about celebrity basket case Courtney Love.
posted by Sonny Jim on Dec 10, 2002 - 6 comments

Some other numbers

Some other numbers "During the period known as the Aids epidemic, 14 million people died of heart disease while 9 million succumbed to cancer, which is 8.5 million more than those counted for AIDS." And Aids is 100% preventable too. So why all the focus on it, to the exclusion of other diseases that pose much more horrible threats to us?
posted by bonaldi on Dec 1, 2002 - 11 comments

AIDS Dissidents

AIDS Dissidents argue AIDS is not really caused by HIV but is a production of medical and pharmaceutical conglomerates. They are willing to argue the point even though some are HIV positive. They use "Seven Deadly Deceptions" such as "The HIV test is unreliable--so don't get tested." to further their cause; and their cause is growing.
posted by Neale on Dec 1, 2002 - 3 comments

The Access to Essential Medicines Campaign

The Access to Essential Medicines Campaign is an initiative by Medecins Sans Frontieres that seeks to "lower the prices of existing medicines in developing countries, to bring abandoned drugs back into production, to stimulate research and development for neglected diseases that primarily affect the poor, and to overcome other barriers to access." HIV is one target disease. The Campaign's press releases, press clips and reports on HIV give a good picture of recent developments. In light of this evidence, does anyone care to step up and defend "big pharma" and the governments of the wealthy North? Have we/they "done enough"? What would "doing enough" look like, given the scope of the crisis?
posted by stonerose on Dec 1, 2002 - 5 comments

AIDS a century from now

"More than we can bear." The impact of the AIDS pandemic over the next 100 years may have effects even more far-reaching than many of us have considered. Joseph Riverson has some thoughts on what it will take to prevent a "Black Death" reality.
posted by litlnemo on Dec 1, 2002 - 1 comment

Antibiotics no good anymore?

First vancomycin-resistant bacteria found in Detroit. This is worrisome, as vancomycin is usually the last antibiotic of choice when fighting a bacterial infection. Bacteria are both helpful and hurtful to the human body, but the little bugs seem to evolve much more quickly than humans own immune systems. Have we seen an end to antibiotics used in the fight against bacteria? What alternatives do we have?
posted by WolfDaddy on Nov 12, 2002 - 37 comments

A quick HIV test is about to hit the US market.

A quick HIV test is about to hit the US market. An HIV test that is easy to administer and provides results in 20 minutes has just been approved by the FDA. This is a big deal partly because almost 250,000 Americans are infected and don't know it. The ease of this fast-response test will help identify some of them.
posted by o2b on Nov 8, 2002 - 30 comments

Go cannabis!

Go cannabis! As discussed in an earlier Mefi thread, there are a handful of medical marijuana referendums in various states. Possibly the most interesting is Nevada's constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana for medicinal use. It looks like this will become the law of the land (scroll all the way down). Arizona seems to have a few more NARCs (Proposition 203) than it does free-thinkers. In South Dakota, it looks like an industrial hemp initiative (bottom) has failed (Initiated Measure 1). How are the pot-legalization crusaders doing in your own home state?
posted by Hammerikaner on Nov 5, 2002 - 40 comments

History of Medicine

History of Medicine The (US) National Library of Medicine has a fine collection of online exhibits on subjects as diverse asDream Anatomy, 500 years of Paracelsus, America's first woman MD, a brief history of caesarian section, Islamic and Chinese medicine, and much more....
posted by plep on Nov 4, 2002 - 5 comments

William James, The Nitrous Oxide Philosopher

William James, The Nitrous Oxide Philosopher The fascinating history of laughing gas has always included goofy moments and famous users (Samuel Coleridge and Peter Roget among them), but few took the drug as seriously as American philosopher William James. He wrote an 1882 essay about the "intense metaphysical illumination" nitrous provided. Of course, laughing gas has dangers, can kill you if used stupidly, and can also send you to jail. But is hippie crack always bad? Or are there times when it might actually be kind of appropriate? [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Oct 11, 2002 - 21 comments

Tiny camera reveals the inside story for patient.
This is pretty dam clever. Girl swallows pill size camera, and doctors 40 miles away investigate her condition. Echos of Inner Space and The fantastic voyage
posted by monkeyJuice on Oct 11, 2002 - 6 comments

Digital Clendening

Digital Clendening The University of Kansas Medical Center has an interesting archive of images and text relating to the medical profession. I'm not sure how I happened on this (I was just cleaning out my bookmarks - some google search found this but I don't recall what I was searching for).
posted by substrate on Oct 10, 2002 - 6 comments

Page: 1 ... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14