275 posts tagged with mexico.
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Dominicans speak only one word. And it is all of the words.

Joanna rants: Types of Spanish Accents [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Nov 16, 2015 - 44 comments

Peter Tosh would be proud

In a 4-to-1 decision, the Mexican Supreme Court has ruled that recreational marijuana use is legal, an enormous change in policy that will impact the drug war, our relations to the US, and pretty much everything about the path our country has been on for decades.
posted by Cobalt on Nov 4, 2015 - 26 comments

How one of the most obese countries on earth took on the soda giants

As debate rages about whether to introduce a sugar tax, this is the story of how Mexico defied its own powerful fizzy drinks industry to impose a tax on soda. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 4, 2015 - 12 comments

Archaeology from the Air, the photographs of Charles and Anne Lindbergh

In 1929, two years after his historic solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne photographed archaeological sites in the American Southwest and Mayan sites in Central America (Google books preview) as a side-gig while Charles helped set North America air mail routes. Almost 80 years later, Erik Berg re-visited those same Southwestern sites, as seen in the exhibition Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time (media bank) and book Oblique Views: Aerial Photography and Southwest Archaeology. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 26, 2015 - 4 comments

They called the wind Patricia

San Patricio & Barra De Navidad will experience equivalent EF5 tornado & 20 foot tsunami at same time. After a remarkable burst of intensification, Hurricane Patricia is headed to the Mexican coast with 200 mile per hour (320 kph) sustained winds. It is the strongest hurricane on record in the Western Hemisphere.
posted by dances_with_sneetches on Oct 23, 2015 - 127 comments

just like swallowing a baby carrot

A drug mule for a Mexican cartel flies into Dayton, OH, gives up a kilo of heroin to federal agents, and provides a narrow glimpse of the current drug trade. (SLWaPo). [more inside]
posted by pjenks on Sep 25, 2015 - 14 comments

"We’re using tactics and equipment that you will see in war zones.”

Death on Sevenmile Road
The rush to militarize the U.S.-Mexico border has tragic consequences in Texas.
posted by andoatnp on Sep 19, 2015 - 30 comments

Squeezebox Stories: tales of the accordion, the instrument that you hug

California has long been home to immigrants from around the world (and from within the U.S.). What is less known, however, is that such longstanding histories of immigration and internal domestic migration have made California a fertile ground for extremely diverse and vibrant accordion musical cultures. With that, here is background on four immigrant populations —Italians, Creoles, Lebanese/Middle Eastern, and Mixtec/Mexican — to give more background the Squeezebox Stories, about an hour of history and tales of the accordion, filtered through customs and cultures found in California. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 12, 2015 - 25 comments

Decade Of Betrayal: Mexican Repatriation In The 1930s

Francisco E. Balderrama on Fresh Air: America's Forgotten History Of Mexican-American 'Repatriation' In the 1930s, during the Depression, about a million people were forced out of the U.S. across the border into Mexico. It wasn't called deportation. It was euphemistically referred to as repatriation, returning people to their native country. But about 60 percent of the people in the Mexican repatriation drive were actually U.S. citizens of Mexican descent. [more inside]
posted by Golden Eternity on Sep 10, 2015 - 31 comments

"We don't have victories anymore."

Mexico v. US Soccer Match Preview
posted by OmieWise on Sep 10, 2015 - 11 comments

Secret Tunnels

Urban Myth Confirmed True as Archaeologists Discover Hidden Tunnels in Mexico "Talk of a maze of underground tunnels beneath the Colonial city of Puebla in Mexico have long been disregarded as mere urban legend. However, city authorities have now confirmed that their existence is no myth. Believed to date back as early as 1531, when the city was founded, the subterranean tunnels are believed to extend as far as 10 kilometers beneath the historic center of the city." (more here (in spanish))
posted by dhruva on Sep 5, 2015 - 15 comments

100 Years of ...

[more inside]
posted by jillithd on Aug 6, 2015 - 11 comments

The continuing crisis in Mexico - Now with more dead journalists

Last saturday Ruben Espinosa, a Mexican photojournalist, was found dead in his apartment in a middle-class neighborghood in Mexico City. With him, four women were also found dead, three of which lived in the same apartment, and a domestic employee. All five showed signs of torture and had been killed with a shot to the head, execution style. [more inside]
posted by omegar on Aug 3, 2015 - 15 comments

Ghosts of Iguala

The Intercept investigates the Mexican government's account of the September 26, 2014 disappearance of 43 students of the Escuela Normal Rural Raúl Isidro Burgos, also known as the Ayotzinapa Normal School. Part One. Part Two. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on May 15, 2015 - 6 comments

"It’s a class I teach once a year; it fills within 24 hours"

Would you put oregano on your posole?
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 6, 2015 - 16 comments

Tacos in Los Angeles

Tacos 101: Part I: History and Etiquette. Part II: Condiments, Meat, and Tortillas. Part III: The LA Taco Scene. A Beginner’s Guide to Offal Tacos. The Rise of the Compton Taco. Tacopedia: A Complete Guide to the Taco Styles of LA.
posted by Juliet Banana on Mar 27, 2015 - 42 comments

Mexico Mass Graves

Hundreds of mass graves have been discovered across Mexico, but the government isn’t keeping tabs. How many clandestinely buried bodies are rotting under the country’s surface? (SLBF)
posted by josher71 on Mar 26, 2015 - 33 comments

Mummified Remains found on Pico de Orizaba, Mexico's Highest Peak

Mexico mummies: Climbers find eerie head in snow, dig to find mummies embracing The mummies will be transported down the mountain as early Monday. These frozen Mexico mummies will make their descent with climbers who have special cases to keep the frozen mummies intact. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on Mar 8, 2015 - 7 comments

A man may have been kidnapped by Mexican drug cartels for his IT skills

A telecommunications worker has disappeared, and there seems to be evidence that drug cartels are responsible. Missing man Felipe del Jesús Peréz García is one of about 40 IT professionals who have been taken in the region, possibly to maintain communications infrastructure for drug lords.
posted by averysmallcat on Mar 5, 2015 - 17 comments

Tiny Sounds

Gone With A Trace (pop-up audio warning): a 20-min. audio documentary about photographer Richard Misrach (previously) and the objects he finds along the US/Mexico border, which are then turned into musical instruments by Guillermo Galindo. There's an accompanying photo slide on cbc's The Current site.
posted by mannequito on Feb 12, 2015 - 4 comments

SE BUSCA, WANTED: For causing generations in Mexico to read and think

The Mexican political activist and critic Carlos Monsiváis once said that cartoonist Eduardo Del Rio, a.k.a Rius, was more important than the Ministry of Education in getting Mexicans to read. Rius' work forms the basis for a wide-ranging new exhibition at Mexico City's Museo Del Estanquillo, along with the lesser-known output of his spiritual predecessor, Andrés Audiffred. [more inside]
posted by beijingbrown on Jan 12, 2015 - 3 comments

"The contrast between the treatment of produce and of people is stark."

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables — the first in a series of four Los Angeles Times long-form stories about labor conditions discovered during an 18-month investigation of Mexican vegetable farms that supply produce to the United States. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 8, 2014 - 38 comments

Catarina's most elaborate visions took the form of demonic fiestas

There is little trace of the presence of the South Asians who lived and worked in Mexico during the colonial period except for one woman whose legend lives on even today. She was purportedly born Mira in the kingdom of the Gran Mogol, or the Great Mughals, where she was captured by the Portuguese who eventually sold her to the Spanish at the port of Manila.
The 'Mughal Princess' of Mexico: At the South Asian American Digital Archive, Meha Priyadarshini briefly explores the myths and realities of Catarina de San Juan (1606-1688), a religious mystic/visionary who sailed on the Manila galleon to Mexico nearly four hundred years ago and over time became associated in popular legend with a well-known style of dress. The etymological complexity of one keyword involved should not be underestimated and itself tells another story about the history of colonialism.
posted by Monsieur Caution on Nov 28, 2014 - 12 comments

Blood on the Corn

Chuck Bowden's final story,16 years in the making, is a fascinating 3 part read in to the torture and murder of DEA agent Enrique Camarena in 1985. [Part 1][Part 2][Part 3] [more inside]
posted by bigdave on Nov 19, 2014 - 8 comments

Around the clock

The Green Monster: How the Border Patrol became America’s most out-of-control law enforcement agency.
A long-form report from Politico.
posted by Joe in Australia on Nov 16, 2014 - 15 comments

Vintage photo finds

Vintage Photo Finds is a site with vintage photographs. According to creator Joel Snow:
The following pictures were found as negatives at the bottom of a cardboard box at a flea market. I shot them with my SLR on a lightbox and inverted them back to positives with Photshop. I'm not sure if it was a single photographer, or many, but many of the shots show an artistic and creative eye and share a similar style.
[more inside] posted by tykky on Nov 5, 2014 - 9 comments

Crisis in Mexico: the government is killing students - again

Something happened the night of September 26th, 2014 near the town of Iguala, 100 miles from Acapulco, Mexico. According to The New Yorker: “Scores of uniformed municipal police and a handful of masked men dressed in black shot and killed six people, wounded more than twenty, and rounded up and detained forty-three students in a series of attacks carried out at multiple points and lasting more than three hours [...] The forty-three students taken into police custody are now ‘disappeared.” All 43 students, all young men who were studying to become rural teachers, are still missing, presumed dead. [more inside]
posted by omegar on Oct 28, 2014 - 35 comments

All cities are mad, but the madness is gallant.

Planned cities are not a new idea (Palmanova, Italy, 1593). From Washington, D.C. (1791), to Canberra, Australia (1911), to Brasilia, Brazil (1957), planned cities have long been an urban dream (from space), perhaps most frequently applied to national capitals. But they don't always work out as planned. [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Oct 14, 2014 - 34 comments

American mothers around the world

Joanna Goddard has been interviewing American women raising their children in other countries, to hear how motherhood around the world compared and contrasted with motherhood in America. She's talked to parents in Norway, Japan, Congo, Northern Ireland, Mexico, Abu Dhabi, India, England, China, Germany, Australia, Turkey, and Chile. [more inside]
posted by Banknote of the year on Oct 10, 2014 - 50 comments

Hole in the Border

Moving the Mexican Border
The whole point of setting the border between Mexico and the United States at the deepest channel of the Rio Grande was that the river was not supposed to move. That was the thinking in 1848 [...]
[more inside] posted by Joe in Australia on Sep 21, 2014 - 8 comments

The happiest place on earth: TIJUANA!

I am on the western edge of the United States-Mexico border to understand more about the most publicised and most crossed border in the world. Ben Stubbs visits one of the most notorious borders in the world and reflects on Australia's frontier issues.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Sep 11, 2014 - 12 comments

They kicked hetero butt up and down the state of Chihuahua

The Man Without a Mask, The New Yorker on Cassandro and the role of the exótico within lucha libre.
“It was Baby Sharon who encouraged me to step out of Mister Romano,” Armendáriz said. Baby Sharon was an exótico—a luchador who wrestles in drag. Exóticos have been around since the nineteen-forties. At first, they were dandies, a subset of rudos with capes and valets. They struck glamour-boy poses and threw flowers to the audience. As exóticos got swishier and more flirtatious, and started dressing in drag, the shtick became old-school limp-wristed gay caricature. Crowds loved to hate them, screaming “Maricón!” and “Joto!” (“Faggot!”). The exóticos made a delightful contrast with the super-masculine brutes they met in the ring. Popular exóticos insisted that it was all an act—in real life, they were straight. Baby Sharon was among the first, according to Armendáriz, to publicly say that, no, he was actually gay.
[more inside] posted by frimble on Sep 4, 2014 - 11 comments

Two Ancient Mayan Cities Found in Mexican Jungle

A monster mouth doorway, ruined pyramid temples and palace remains emerged from the Mexican jungle as archaeologists unearthed two ancient Mayan cities.
posted by Pr0t35t3r on Aug 26, 2014 - 24 comments

My hat is beautiful! SPLENDID!

YuMex - Yugoslav Mexico is a 45-minute documentary by Miho Mazzini about Yu-Mex, the genre of music comprising Yugoslav interpretations of Mexican music.
posted by Sticherbeast on Aug 4, 2014 - 12 comments

Mexican DREAMers - Life after return

They grew up in America, were deported or returned to Mexico for other reasons and faced challenges and opportunities alike. A recently funded kickstarter for a book called "Los Otros Dreamers" tells the struggles and hopes of the other DREAMers. Nancy Landa, a deported honors graduate of California State University, who has lived in Tijuana and London since her deportation in 2009, is about to begin a research project collecting the experiences of voluntary and involuntary returns to Mexico after a long time in the U.S. To help in a country that is foreign to them the Mexican nonprofit Dream in Mexico supports young people who just arrived in Mexico. The German Der Spiegel interviewed three young deportees and how returning to Mexico after a lifetime in the U.S was both, a culture shock and an opportunity for a better life. [in German]
posted by travelwithcats on Jul 22, 2014 - 3 comments

that’s fine. i’m going to figure out a way to do this on my own

the rise of the DIY abortion in texas
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jul 1, 2014 - 107 comments

2014 FIFA World Cup: From the Round of 16 to the Winner

With the completion of the group stages, three quarters of the matches in the 2014 FIFA World Cup have been played. Now, it's a straight round-by-round elimination for the remaining 16 teams in their quest to reach the final. There's been biting, alternative commentary, mood swings, (allegedly) sulky England players, exciting matches, the USA vs Ronaldo, Europeans taking early return flights, deep analysis, a fantasy league and many goals - but who will finally lift the trophy in Rio's Estádio do Maracanã on Sunday 13th July? [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Jun 26, 2014 - 1838 comments

The reporter called the poverty level wages "Sanbornomics."

Take Me to Sanborns: Swiss Enchiladas and Race in Mexico City.
One afternoon early in their stay, [Jack] Johnson and Etta – who was white – walked into the famous Sanborns cafe in Mexico City's historic center for lunch. But before they could even place their order, owner Walter Sanborn refused to serve Johnson on racial lines. Johnson went and found a few of the generals he had met and told them what happened. They returned to Sanborns together and all sat down at the counter. They ordered ice cream. Everybody was served except for Johnson.
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Jun 23, 2014 - 53 comments

Colorado River once again--briefly--flows to the sea

On March 23, the floodgates of the Morelos Dam, near Yuma, Arizona opened, unleashing a three-day "pulse" into the dry Colorado River delta. The waters recently reached the Sea of Cortez, and a group of scientists and journalists were there to raft it. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jun 14, 2014 - 18 comments

Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe

Crawling the lost tracks of Latin America. Artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene, a.k.a. "Los Ferronautas," converted a car into a retro-futuristic rail vehicle they dubbed SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada, "Manned Railway Exploration Probe") to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador.
posted by gottabefunky on Jun 12, 2014 - 7 comments

Why the Zapatistas are stronger than ever

Marcos stepping down demonstrates the strength of this autonomous community. On May 2, 2014, José Luis Solís López, better known as Galeano was murdered in the community of La Realidad in the Mexican state of Chiapas. Galeano was murdered by three gunshots after he, unarmed, was surrounded by paramilitary troops and refused to surrender. The attack took place on the eve of a meeting that the Zapatistas had planned to hold with other indigenous organizations and indigenous people of Mexico during which spokesperson Subcomandante Marcos had planned possibly to reappear after a public absence of nearly six years. During the attack, a number of people were injured, and a Zapatista school and health clinic in La Realidad, both of which were symbols of the movement’s autonomy, were destroyed. [more inside]
posted by whyareyouatriangle on Jun 4, 2014 - 14 comments

Virgincita Plis, the Hello Kitty of Mexico

Amparo "Amparin" Serrano turned the much-revered Our Lady of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico, into its Hello Kitty. In the early 2000s, Amparin drew a cute cartoon version of the Virgin and asked for protection, an inexpensive cell phone, and removal of her cellulite (Google auto-translate; original Spanish article), and it went from there (auto-translation; original page). Now, Serrano and her Distroller company have teamed up with Walmart and other large chain stores, and the brand has also expanded into the US.
posted by filthy light thief on May 17, 2014 - 29 comments

Minute 319

Last November, after five years of remarkable negotiations that unfolded far from the Delta, representatives from the U.S. and Mexico agreed to a complex, multi-part water deal that will give them desperately needed flexibility for weathering the drought. More surprisingly, the two nations will join the team of environmental organizations to release a flood of more than 105,000 acre-feet of water – 3.8 million big-rig tankers' worth – into the Delta's ancient floodplain, and chase it with a smaller, permanent annual flow to sustain the ecosystem.

It is the unlikeliest of times to pull off a deal like this. Rather than hoarding all the water for themselves in this drought –– the river supplies some 35 million people –– the West's largest water agencies have pledged to send some all the way to the sea. That move is, to some extent, a long-overdue acknowledgment that the U.S. bears responsibility for the impacts its dams have caused beyond its borders. And after years of fruitless court fights in the U.S. by environmental groups, the Mexican government finally insisted that water for the Delta be a cornerstone of the broader deal.
For High Country News, Matt Jenkins describes the most ambitious water sharing plan ever created between Mexico and the United States (single page print version). For much more about this project and the water issues surrounding it, there's Eli Rabett's roundup of John Fleck's blogposts about this. (Or read the tl;dr version by Alex Harrowell.)
posted by MartinWisse on May 10, 2014 - 9 comments


NPR Took A 2,428-Mile Road Trip Along The Mexico Border: Here's What They Saw
posted by empath on Apr 3, 2014 - 21 comments

RIP Axolotl

It looks like axolotls are gone forever. This may not mean much to you if you aren't into amphibians, but if you read Mad Magazine back in the day the word might conjure up some memories, or even a poem. [more inside]
posted by kinnakeet on Jan 29, 2014 - 77 comments

DEA and the cartel

DEA Negotiated With Mexican Drug Cartel Members "An investigation by El Universal (in spanish) found that between the years 2000 and 2012, the U.S. government had an arrangement with Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel that allowed the organization to smuggle billions of dollars of drugs while Sinaloa provided information on rival cartels."
posted by dhruva on Jan 13, 2014 - 65 comments

There's no such thing as cruelty free cocaine

'I submit that the drug trade—and specifically cocaine—is among the worst things that the human mind ever invented.' The gruesome human cost of a fun little party treat.
posted by nerdfish on Jan 2, 2014 - 143 comments

La Mujer Mono

Behold! The Heartbreaking, Hair-Raising Tale Of Freak Show Star Julia Pastrana, Mexico’s Monkey Woman
posted by desjardins on Dec 20, 2013 - 7 comments

My face fills the screen

Buried deep among the hundreds of old scripts in RKO Pictures’ archives was a 1941 melodramatic gem about an amnesia-stricken man who wakes up in the middle of a revolution in Mexico. Never produced, the screenplay for “The Way to Santiago” is credited to Orson Welles.
posted by dobbs on Dec 11, 2013 - 6 comments

Why shout, when you can whistle? Whistled languages around the world

The Panamanian golden frog that lives near loud waterfalls and the people of both Kuşköy (a small village in Turkey) and La Gomera (an island off the coast of Morocco) have something in common: creative communication in challenging situations. Where the golden frogs communicate by waving, the people of Kuşköy and La Gomera overcome difficult terrain by whistling. The Turkish people call their language "kuș dili" or "bird langage," as it originated in Kuşköy, which itself means "bird village," and the Silbo Gomero language is so organized and thorough that every vowel and consonant can be replaced with a whistle. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 29, 2013 - 15 comments

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