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24 posts tagged with morocco.
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The Aesthetes

The Aesthetes - For the legendary expats of Tangier, a life devoted to beauty reaches full flower in this North African hothouse of history and hedonism.
posted by backseatpilot on Aug 1, 2014 - 4 comments

Beyond The Arab Spring

Stories of Change: - Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia.
An inside perspective from local visual storytellers on everyday life in North Africa.
The Storytellers.
Timeline.
The Stories.
posted by adamvasco on Jul 22, 2014 - 3 comments

The Sahrawis never had a country

Photojournalist Micah Albert and I made the 1,000-mile journey from the Algerian capital, Algiers, to Rabouni to see if we could find evidence of this purported hotbed of extremism in the Polisario-controlled camps. After months of investigation, including two weeks spent in the camps last September, we didn’t uncover a wellspring of terrorists in the desert. Instead, we found a SADR government desperate to maintain its claim over the shores of the Western Sahara and whatever resources might lie there — like the rich fisheries and the mines that provide most of the world’s phosphate. We found a population, inclusive of the Polisario army, that the U.S. government is indirectly, and perhaps unknowingly, spending millions of dollars each year to feed through a multimillion-dollar aid package provided by the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of Food for Peace.
For Foreign Policy David Conrad reports about the forty year struggle for independence in the Western Sahara and the impact the War on Terror, not to mention the threatened discovery of oil have had on the Sahrawi and their struggle.
posted by MartinWisse on Jul 1, 2014 - 6 comments

Gnawa sounds

Sometimes nothing satisfies quite like the funky bass lines you hear played on the ghimbri in Moroccan Gnawa music, not to mention the ecstatic singing. And Hamid Kasri is one of the greatest exponents of the music. Check him out here and here . [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Mar 25, 2014 - 11 comments

Va Va Vroom

The Motorbike Girl Gangs of Morocco: 'Kesh Angels by Hassan Hajjaj
"His confident, upbeat portraits of young women wearing veils and djellabah while posing on motorcycles subvert preconceived notions of Arab women; his subjects are traditionally clad but defiantly modern, bearing bright smiles and the markers of youth, independence, celebration, and fun."
More from the gallery's website.
posted by infini on Mar 2, 2014 - 21 comments

Why shout, when you can whistle? Whistled languages around the world

The Panamanian golden frog that lives near loud waterfalls and the people of both Kuşköy (a small village in Turkey) and La Gomera (an island off the coast of Morocco) have something in common: creative communication in challenging situations. Where the golden frogs communicate by waving, the people of Kuşköy and La Gomera overcome difficult terrain by whistling. The Turkish people call their language "kuș dili" or "bird langage," as it originated in Kuşköy, which itself means "bird village," and the Silbo Gomero language is so organized and thorough that every vowel and consonant can be replaced with a whistle. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 29, 2013 - 15 comments

"I was right. HE KNEW WHERE MATT DAMON WAS."

Erin Faulk (@erinscafe on Twitter) tells the surprisingly compelling tale of going on a quest to find Matt Damon in Morocco, just cuz. (SLStorify)
posted by dry white toast on Jul 18, 2013 - 28 comments

In global politics, playing by the rules doesn’t always help.

Western Sahara: Why Africa’s last colony can’t break free
posted by infini on Jun 19, 2013 - 20 comments

Women on Waves

Women on Waves is a Dutch organization started by a doctor in 1999 to provide abortion services to women in countries where abortion is illegal by performing procedures in international waters. They have traveled to Ireland, Spain, and Portugal, and now have their eyes set on Morocco. But Moroccan authorities are attempting to prevent the ship from docking. The group promises a surprise response. [more inside]
posted by zug on Oct 4, 2012 - 42 comments

Shooting Morocco

Alfonso Calza created this video from photographs he took of the streets, desert, ocean, mountains, and ruins of Morocco.
posted by gman on Aug 28, 2012 - 5 comments

They were all Clad in the Moorish habite Cassocks of Colourd Cloth or silk with buttons and loopes

The Anglo-Moroccan connection originates in the quarrels between the two half-sisters Queen Elizabeth i and Queen Mary i. Elizabeth suspected that Mary's husband, Philip ii of Spain, had designs on England, and she was consequently interested in an ally who could join in attacking Spain. On the Moroccan side, there was considerable enthusiasm for expelling the Spanish and Portuguese from the several Moroccan coastal cities they had conquered. The Moroccans also wanted naval support in case of further encroachment by the Ottoman Turks, who were eager to extend their empire west from Algiers into Morocco. It was for this last reason that the Moroccan sultan Ahmad al-Mansur was unwilling to collaborate with the Ottomans despite Ottoman consideration of an invasion of Spain: He preferred instead an alliance with the English.

An 'Extreamly Civile' Diplomacy: a short history of early Anglo-Moroccan relations
via the always wonderful @bintbattuta
posted by timshel on Jan 13, 2012 - 7 comments

Júzcar, the Smurfy blue Spanish town

Júzcar is a little Spanish village that voted to stay blue, but their buildings weren't always that hue. In fact, if you view the Google maps, you'll see the traditional whitewashed walls, as you'd expect for one of the (former) White Towns of Andalusia. It happened in advance of Global Smurfs Day, to celebrate the birthday of Peyo (25 June 1928 – 24 December 1992), the Belgian creator of the Smurfs comics. The town was chosen by Sony as the site for the international debut of its new Smurfs movie, who offered to pay for the town to become temporarily blue. The citizens unanimously voted to accept the offer. In September, the 221 residents voted to keep the town blue, as the media coverage was huge, and tourism was boosted from 300 summer tourists to thousands. More photos. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 12, 2012 - 21 comments

Beyond Digital: bringing some of Morocco's off-line culture to the online world at large

Beyond Digital is a collaborative project between eight members who have come together to explore the culture and music of Morocco, which is often poorly represented online to the world at large, thus "beyond digital." The team put together a 9 minute "behind-the-scenes" look at their work, or you skip the preview and jump into their YouTube channel, articles on The Fader, and more on their website. Highlights: a collection of Moroccan percussion loops, a photo essay on Morocco's changing culture, and a collaboration between Moroccan musician Hassan Wargui (Imanaren) and Nettle, a "band project" by DJ/rupture. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 5, 2011 - 2 comments

Chefchaoen, Morocco is Blue, but not sad

All Azure: The Monochromatic City of Chefchaoen, Morocco
posted by hippybear on Jun 26, 2011 - 21 comments

No Baggage Challenge

Rolf Potts will travel through 12 countries in 42 days, with his current location updated here. He intends to do all this with no luggage, no backpack, no man purse -- not even a fanny pack. [via mefi projects]
posted by gman on Sep 15, 2010 - 51 comments

Far Blue Horizon

Morocco by Motorbike. The perfect escape for a lazy weekend day. Just watch out for ancient tombs. [more inside]
posted by Eideteker on Jan 30, 2010 - 10 comments

The forgotten people

Western Sahara has the dubious distinction of being the subject of probably the most forgotten-about post-colonial conflict in the world. Until 1975, the Spanish government considered Western Sahara a Spanish province, just as much an integral part of its territory as any of its provinces in the Iberian peninsula. However, at the beginning of the 70s, a burgeoning pro-independence movement, and increasing appetites of its Northern and Southern neighbours, Marocco and Mauritania, led to a UN visiting mission in early 1975, which found that "there was an overwhelming consensus among Saharans within the Territory in favour of independence and opposing integration with any neighbouring country". This finding was given additional support by an opinion by the International Court of Justice supporting the Sahrawis right to self-determination against the claims of neighbouring nations. [more inside]
posted by Skeptic on Nov 30, 2009 - 35 comments

to morocco

One Last Journey. "Cars these days, they're like washing machines." (Not Clarkson...)
posted by parmanparman on Jan 24, 2008 - 13 comments

Get Down From There This Instant

Moroccan Argan Trees threatened by climbing goats.
More pictures of goats in trees.
posted by Partial Law on Jan 5, 2007 - 50 comments

Thick Description

Pioneering Anthropologist Clifford Geertz Dies. An era ends.
posted by Seth_Messinger on Oct 31, 2006 - 55 comments

Armchair travel

Images of daily life Photoessays of daily life in Morocco, Yemen and Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, and Hong Kong. [An update on a plep thread from 2003, and some nice armchair travel for a Sunday morning]
posted by carter on Dec 4, 2005 - 8 comments

Hi mom!

Iwan.com has lots of nice photos of interesting places and people and an inoffensive site layout.
posted by ab'd al'Hazred on Dec 1, 2005 - 21 comments

Like Burning Man, but with less drugs and more goats

"She didn't seem to care for the hawker selling goats' heads. But she did stop when a young, well-dressed fellow ambled over to her and said: 'You have captured my liver.'" This and other stories from a very well-detailed article on the three-day dating festival of the Berbers of Morocco.
posted by XQUZYPHYR on Sep 12, 2003 - 5 comments

Chris and Erin's Wild Ride

In May 1999, Chris and Erin Ratay quit their jobs, sold their Upper West Side Manhattan apartment, and shipped their motorcycles to Morocco to begin a trip around the world. Now, four years, 50 countries, and 100,000 miles later, they're back home. They've kept a continuously updated web journal over the past four years, available here. Ignore the unfortunate font and JavaScript choices and read this couple's incredible story.
posted by grrarrgh00 on Aug 11, 2003 - 7 comments

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