3 posts tagged with movie by alexoscar.
Displaying 1 through 3 of 3.

Related tags:
+ (363)
+ (90)
+ (84)
+ (73)
+ (56)
+ (53)
+ (50)
+ (41)
+ (41)
+ (40)
+ (30)
+ (29)
+ (29)
+ (29)
+ (28)
+ (24)
+ (23)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (21)
+ (20)
+ (20)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (16)
+ (16)
+ (15)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)


Users that often use this tag:
The Whelk (47)
zarq (33)
filthy light thief (27)
Artw (22)
reenum (14)
miss lynnster (13)
Joe Beese (13)
Brandon Blatcher (11)
the man of twists ... (11)
philip-random (10)
flapjax at midnite (9)
Rhaomi (9)
Sticherbeast (7)
AlonzoMosleyFBI (7)
XQUZYPHYR (6)
Blazecock Pileon (5)
flatluigi (5)
cthuljew (5)
Fizz (5)
Charlemagne In Swe... (5)
mathowie (4)
planetkyoto (4)
gottabefunky (4)
grumblebee (4)
bwg (4)
Chinese Jet Pilot (4)
hippybear (4)
davidjmcgee (4)
Trurl (4)
stbalbach (3)
kliuless (3)
feelinglistless (3)
boost ventilator (3)
kirkaracha (3)
mr_crash_davis (3)
psychotic_venom (3)
blue_beetle (3)
veedubya (3)
Paragon (3)
tellurian (3)
shivohum (3)
boo_radley (3)
JPowers (3)
Effigy2000 (3)
grobstein (3)
Afroblanco (3)
zamboni (3)
cashman (3)
Pope Guilty (3)
crossoverman (3)
P.o.B. (3)
not_on_display (3)
Blasdelb (3)
alexoscar (3)
Lovecraft In Brooklyn (3)
Egg Shen (3)
Going To Maine (3)
bobbyelliott (2)
The Deej (2)
infini (2)

"...the way of nature, and the way of grace."

For Roger Ebert, it's a prayer that made him "more alert to the awe of existence." For Rober Koehler, it's a kitschy New Age con. For Richard Brody, it perfectly captures the essence of a generation by depicting a character thinking "back to the musings and fantasies of childhood, which are the product of a wondrous and fantastic view of science formed by popular-science books for children and by the commercial artists whose illustrations adorned them." For Stephanie Zacharek, it's "a gargantuan work of pretension." For Ignatiy Vishnevetsky, it's "a creation myth in the guise of a crypto-autobiography" that invents a universe of its own only to destroy it. For J. Hoberman, it's lifeless and dull, "essentially a religious work and, as such, may please the director's devotees, cultists, and apologists." It spent thirty years in development, three in editing and, yes, it contains dinosaurs. The Tree of Life, written and directed by famously reclusive Zoolander fan and "JD Salinger of American movies" Terrence Malick , won the Palme d'Or at this year's Cannes Film Festival. Tomorrow, it comes out in the United States. [more inside]
posted by alexoscar on May 26, 2011 - 64 comments

 

As Michael Cera said in that movie about Twitter, “We don’t even know what this is yet.”

Have you ever gotten lost in the Myst-inspired architecture of Anthology Film Archives’ website, or struggled awkwardly with the Chinese puzzle box-construction of BAMcinematek’s calendars? Have you ever circled the block at Lincoln Plaza in search of the secret entrance to the fabled Walter Reade Theater? (Hint: look behind the waterfall.) Have you found yourself asking time and again, “What the fuck is Union Docs?”
The brainchild of critic Paul Brunick, Alt Screen is a new site billed as "a comprehensive digital resource covering film exhibitions and related special events in the New York City area." The contributing editors include blogger Jim Emerson, Ignatiy Vishnevetsky [previously] and Nathan Lee (apparently coming out of retirement).
posted by alexoscar on Apr 10, 2011 - 8 comments

"Serge Daney was the end of criticism as I understood it."

Serge Daney (1944 - 1992) is often cited as one of the greatest film critics. After joining the legendary film magazine Cahiers du cinéma (which he would eventually edit) at age 20, Daney wrote extensively on the changing place of movies in culture, on directors new and old and on television, war and even sports. He founded the film magazine Trafic before dying of AIDS in 1992.

Though some of his essays have been officially translated and a small book of his writings has been published in English, the vast majority of his work remains untranslated into English. That hasn't stopped a devoted group of cinephiles from taking matters into their own hands. [more inside]
posted by alexoscar on Dec 13, 2010 - 12 comments

Page: 1