339 posts tagged with museum.
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Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Monet, and La Japonaise

A program at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts inviting visitors to don a replica kimono from a Monet work has sparked protests over appropriation. Boston Art blog Big, Red & Shiny also has a write-up. [more inside]
posted by PussKillian on Jul 7, 2015 - 77 comments

If it weren't for Edison we'd be watching TV by candlelight

James Comisar has amassed a collection of movie and TV props which he currently houses in storage while he sets up the actual Museum of Television.
posted by growabrain on Jul 6, 2015 - 11 comments

Ballast

For the first time, "the wreckage of a slaving ship that went down with slaves aboard has been recovered." The recovery of artifacts from the 1794 shipwreck is a milestone for the African Slave Wrecks Project, a collaboration by six partner groups (including the National Museum of African-American Art and Culture and the National Parks Service) to find, document, and preserve archaeological remnants of the slave trade. Some of the objects will be included in exhibits in the NMAAHC.
posted by Miko on May 31, 2015 - 7 comments

Emerald. Elegant. Curious. Hidden. Unseen. Dragon. Treasures. Unbound.

The Asians Art Museum is a parody site bringing a cirtical lens to orientalist tropes in art museums, prompted particularly by rhetorical choices of the San Francisco Art Museum's 2009 Lords of the Samurai exhibition [audio]. It highlights the tendency for museums showing Asian art to present their shows as a"a harmless trip to a fantasyland of romanticized premodern Otherness, a place where dreams of Manifest Destiny never have to die?" [more inside]
posted by Miko on May 21, 2015 - 24 comments

"My god, are they going to leave me here to die?"

The late Roger Ebert writes about a piece conceptual artist Chris Burden performed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in 1975. Chris Burden previously on Metafilter.
posted by Juliet Banana on May 11, 2015 - 23 comments

"I usually show at the credit union on Vashon."

Seattle artist Matthew Offenbacher recently won a $25,000 prize. So he and his partner Jennifer Nemhauser decided to do something revolutionary with it. They bought 7 pieces of art by local female and queer artists and donated it to the Seattle Art Museum for its permanent collection: Deed of Gift.
posted by zarq on May 7, 2015 - 11 comments

How deserted lies the city

New York's Museum of Biblical Art is closing June 14th, despite large recent crowds (NYT). Often confused for a evangelical organization, perhaps because of its name, MOBIA is something unique: a secular institution that is serious about placing religious art clearly in the context of the beliefs that inspired it. David van Biema explains what we are losing.
posted by Pater Aletheias on May 5, 2015 - 20 comments

Caution: This is ARt

"How the Whitney might just solve the impossible problem of contemporary art."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 28, 2015 - 16 comments

The High Line's New Museum

A New Whitney It has been interesting to watch the High Line progress from nothing more than a dream to its current wonderful reality mixing green, gleam and grit. Jason's early unauthorized foray introduced many around these parts to the High Line. Now the Whitney moves in.
posted by caddis on Apr 19, 2015 - 11 comments

"Whenever you dig a hole [in Lecce], centuries of history come out"

In 2000, Luciano Faggiano wanted to open a trattoria in Lecce, in the "boot-heel" of Italy. He bought what looked to be a modern building, but he had to open the floors in 2001 to find a leaking sewer pipes that were causing continuous humidity problems. He didn't find pipes, but a subterranean world tracing back before the birth of Jesus: a Messapian tomb, a Roman granary, a Franciscan chapel and even etchings from the Knights Templar. Instead of opening a restaurant, his family has a museum, which is also available to virtually tour on Google Maps.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 17, 2015 - 13 comments

Museum Dance Off 2

Museum Dance Off 2. 28 participating museums have created videos showcasing their staff/interns/volunteers etc. dancing and lip-syncing to their melody of choice. Voting begins on April 20 and runs through April 29, with several museum dance videos highlighted each day, out of which viewers choose one favorite. Those favorites will ultimately battle it out in the next rounds, until only one is left standing. Anyone can vote, from anywhere in the world. Voting rules and videos are at the main link. Here is the official trailer. Smithsonian Magazine article on the competition.
posted by gudrun on Apr 16, 2015 - 3 comments

"My friend here Mr. Burke is going to trounce you all with a vengeance."

The Georgian Celebrity Map (or, A Peek at the Stars of James Gillray’s Caricatures) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 31, 2015 - 10 comments

Let's go exploring!

Bill Watterson, the famously reclusive creator of Calvin & Hobbes, has given his longest interview to date, to be published in the exhibition catalog for the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum's exhibit, Exploring Calvin & Hobbes.
posted by overeducated_alligator on Mar 12, 2015 - 28 comments

the beauty of the visual arts for those unable to see them

“It’s an unbelievable sensation,” Mr. González said. “I’m feeling this painting down to the detail of each fingernail.” (SLNewYorker)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 9, 2015 - 4 comments

Is it an art gallery? A plantation tour? A museum?

Building the First Slavery Museum in America - David Amsden, The New York Times
"From their weathered cypress frames, a dusty path, lined with hulking iron kettles that were used by slaves to boil sugar cane, leads to a grassy clearing dominated by a slave jail — an approach designed so that a visitor’s most memorable glimpse of the white shutters and stately columns of the property’s 220-year-old 'Big House' will come through the rusted bars of the squat, rectangular cell. A number of memorials also dot the grounds, including a series of angled granite walls engraved with the names of the 107,000 slaves who spent their lives in Louisiana before 1820. Inspired by Maya Lin’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, the memorial lists the names nonalphabetically to mirror the confusion and chaos that defined a slave’s life."
[more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 27, 2015 - 21 comments

Radios in museums

Do you like radios? And museums? Then you need the radiomuseum.org gazatteer of museums and historical places around the world where you can look at radios and associated technologies!
posted by carter on Feb 25, 2015 - 8 comments

An Ex Axe

"I love you" – WHAT A LIE! LIES, DAMN LIES! Yes, it's like that when you are young, naïve and in love. And you don't realize your boyfriend started dating you just because he wanted to take you to bed! I got this teddy bear for Valentine's. He survived on top of my closet in a plastic bag, because it wasn’t him who hurt me, but the idiot who left him behind.
-- "I love you" Teddy bear
2002 Zagreb, Croatia
"I love you" Teddy bear is one of the exhibits at The Museum of Broken Relationships. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 12, 2015 - 11 comments

Save Dippy vs Team Whale

Since 1979 the main hall in London's Natural History Museum has been dominated by a plaster cast of a fossil of a Diplodocus (apparently called 'Dippy'). It has been announced that is to be replaced by the skeleton of a Blue Whale. There has been somewhat of a reaction.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 1, 2015 - 23 comments

33 Million Things

Shelf Life is the first episode in a new video blog from the American Museum of Natural History, in which scientists, curators, and collection specialists take you behind-the-scenes at the Museum. Bonus interview: Atlas Obscura.
posted by carter on Dec 9, 2014 - 3 comments

The Phantasmagoric Work of Mr. Gober

Robert Gober's 40-year survey "The Heart is Not a Metaphor" is now on view at the MoMA, and it's a fantastic freakin' spectacle to the eye.
posted by ourt on Oct 20, 2014 - 10 comments

Because collect-and-cage is boring

Why I hate museums.
posted by shivohum on Sep 27, 2014 - 83 comments

Free Museum Day!

Nothing to do tomorrow (Sept. 27th, 2014)? Well, it's Museum Day Live, and you can score free admission for two at over 1,500 museums in the United States by registering at Smithsonian.com. (Search here to determine if there are any participating museums in your area.)
posted by HuronBob on Sep 26, 2014 - 18 comments

Mona Lisa in a weekend

Mark Landis is an art forger who seems to be driven not by money, but by the desire to be a philanthropist. [more inside]
posted by PussKillian on Sep 19, 2014 - 20 comments

Whispers in the Gallery

Self-described collector of sounds and artist John Kannenberg records the sounds that echo through museums (usually thought of as spaces where silence is enforced) and creating works that "investigate the psychogeography of museums and archives, the processes of making and observing art, the psychology of collection, and the human experience of time." [more inside]
posted by PussKillian on Aug 6, 2014 - 3 comments

Save The Sounds!

The Museum Of Endangered Sounds [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 6, 2014 - 35 comments

The Digitized Medieval Manuscripts App

The DMMapp (Digitized Medieval Manuscripts App) is a website that links to more than 300 libraries in the world. Each one of these contains medieval manuscripts that can be browsed for free. The DMMapp is a product of Sexy Codicology, an independent project focused on medieval illuminated manuscripts and social media. It maintains a great blog about medieval manuscripts, especially those that are available online.
posted by jedicus on Aug 5, 2014 - 6 comments

How to Mount a Horse in Armor and Other Chivalric Problems

Just how heavy and cumbersome was medieval armor? Who wore it? What did it look like? To find out, watch How to Mount a Horse in Armor and Other Chivalric Problems, an entertaining, informative, and deliciously snarky presentation by Dirk H. Breiding, assistant curator of the Department of Arms and Armor at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. [more inside]
posted by jedicus on Aug 2, 2014 - 16 comments

Mr. Ed's Elephant Museum

Who wants elephants and candy? Inspired by the post on the troll museum... if you're ever driving Route 30 in Pennsylvania, heading towards Gettysburg, you may pass by Mister Ed's Elephant Museum and Candy Emporium. [more inside]
posted by jenfullmoon on Jul 24, 2014 - 4 comments

The Museum of Middle School

The avant garde tweener, now 14 and headed to high school, has opened an online museum devoted to "honoring a rather ignored stage in anthropology-- Middle School" [more inside]
posted by zymoglyphic on Jul 10, 2014 - 18 comments

"A neon sign starts and ends with a line."

"Once illuminated, the line transforms: It mimics and abstracts, glows and flickers, and implores and distracts." An online museum of Hong Kong's neon signs.
posted by spitefulcrow on May 26, 2014 - 7 comments

Intergalactic Spaceboat of Light and Wonder

Matthew Inman of The Oatmeal sure loves his Tesla Model S. He also thinks that, for using Tesla's name for his company, the least Elon Musk could do was help fund a Tesla museum. Musk agreed.
posted by gottabefunky on May 14, 2014 - 116 comments

a part of the museum, a cemetery, a forensics lab, or a tomb

How to Honor the Dead We Cannot Name: The problems with the Sept. 11 memorial museum.
posted by davidstandaford on May 13, 2014 - 47 comments

fiction in the form of art gallery plaques

"Card Tricks by James Hannaham recommended by Jennifer Egan"
"By invoking the existence of artworks involving the gallery space, the people inside it, and the larger world (quite literally), Hannaham performs an ingenious reversal: the subject illuminated by the plaques ends up being us, the reader-viewers. And our experience of reading and viewing them—in what order we choose, in what state we’re in that day or night, in what company, in what mood, in what weather, is the narrative."
posted by davidstandaford on May 5, 2014 - 3 comments

GATAACGCGGATGCGTAT

The Animated Genome is a spirited 5-minute film that uses graphics to explain the makeup of your genome and how it affects life and health. It's part of Genome: Unlocking Life's Code, an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History.
posted by grouse on Apr 25, 2014 - 6 comments

American Museum of Natural Unlocks 1000's Of Old Photos

The American Museum of Natural History will unlock thousands of old photos from their vault, they announced this week. The new online image database (officially launching on Monday the 28th) will take you behind the curtain, delivering images that span the 145-year history of the Museum. The collection features over 7,000 images—many never before seen by the public—and includes photos, rare book illustrations, drawings, notes, letters, art, and Museum memorabilia. They say "it’s like stepping into a time machine and seeing a long ago NYC or just catching glimpses of ghosts from a forgotten world now seen only by researchers and Museum staff." Previously. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 24, 2014 - 6 comments

Greetings From Interzone

David Cronenberg: a virtual exhibition based on an exhibit at the Toronto International Film Festival.
posted by brundlefly on Apr 7, 2014 - 5 comments

Travelers

The Dead Zoo Gang "Over the last several years, millions of dollars worth of antique rhino horns have been stolen from natural history museum collections around the world. The only thing more unusual than the crimes is the theory about who is responsible: A handful of families from rural Ireland known as the Rathkeale Rovers." (Via)
posted by zarq on Apr 2, 2014 - 22 comments

Necessary Fictophones

Since the taxonomical work of Erich Moritz von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs* in the early twentieth century, organologists have classified musical instruments into four major categories, each distinguished by its primary sound-producing mechanism: idiophones (vibrating body), membranophones (vibrating membrane), chordophones (vibrating strings) and aerophones (vibrating air columns). Beyond these basic divisions, scholars have proposed such logically consistent additions as electrophones (for electronic instruments) and corpophones (for the human body as a source of sound). We propose a seventh category: fictophones, for imaginary musical instruments. Existing as diagrams, drawings or written descriptions, these devices never produce a sound. Yet they are no less a part of musical culture for that. Indeed, fictophones represent an essential if hitherto unrecognized domain of musical thought and activity, and it is in order to catalog these conceptual artifacts that we have established the first institution of its kind: The Museum of Imaginary Musical Instruments.
posted by carsonb on Mar 5, 2014 - 19 comments

Whale Ho

The Charles W. Morgan is the world's last remaining wooden whaleship. Her unusually long career included 37 whaling voyages between 1841 and 1921. Over the past few years, she's received a full restoration by the skilled shipwrights at the Mystic Seaport Museum Shipyard, and is in the final stages of outfitting for her 38th voyage, an ambituous plan to make her seaworthy enough to sail her one final time and visit her original homeport of New Bedford, MA, along with many of the ports she frequented in her working days, before she returns to her permanent berth. Among the crew will be one stowaway, a crew member chosen via a selective process including a video application, who'll use video and social media to tell the stories of the voyage, the crew, the accompanying scholars and artists, and what it's like to make amends with whales.
posted by Miko on Feb 15, 2014 - 21 comments

Science Guy versus "God" Guy

Bill Nye is debating the head of the Creation Museum tomorrow. Ken Ham, founder of Northern Kentucky tourist attraction "Answers in Genesis" Creation Museum, has challenged Science Guy Bill Nye to a duel, errr, a debate. Nye, while tolerant of Ham's religious beliefs, draws the line at creationism creeping into science curriculum. More pre-event throwdowns are here. [more inside]
posted by tizzie on Feb 3, 2014 - 350 comments

Mad Science Museum: you'll be living on a diet of exclamation points

Alex Boese is interested in hoaxes, as you can tell from his Museum of Hoaxes website (lots previously), but he also enjoys tracking down weird science stories like Evan O'Neill Kane's self-appendectomy and Allan Walker Blair's black widow bite experiment on himself, as collected at the Mad Science Museum online.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 3, 2014 - 3 comments

A Cabinet of Curiousities

Triumph of the Strange
Is curiosity, however, even a coherent concept? What, if anything, unites the walrus and the Rolodex? According to Dillon and Warner, curiosity is lustful and avaricious, yet as playful as Alice in Wonderland. It distracts itself by flirting with astonishment yet is driven to exacting inspection. It loves secrecy and enigma yet is insatiably questioning and bent on decipherment. It adores intricacy and ingenuity, only to find how evanescent, incommunicable, and random they can be. It's harmless fun and has "an innocent eye"—a central theme, suggested by the Hayward Gallery curator Roger Malbert—yet leads to dangerous revelations. Or maybe it makes dangerous revelations because of this innocence: It follows its own hunches because it doesn't see where they lead. Think of the character Jeffrey Beaumont in Blue Velvet: "I'm seeing something that was always hidden."
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 2, 2014 - 6 comments

"Its structural perfection is matched only by its hostility."

Slate visits the H.R. Giger Museum in Gruyères, Switzerland (Official museum website).
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jan 2, 2014 - 17 comments

a museum deep underground in a salt mine

Salina Turda: salt mines turned subterranean history museum. "What was once an enormous salt mine in Turda, Romania, has now been carefully renovated by the regional Cluj county council into the world’s first salt mining history museum. The Salina Turda salt mines were excavated in the 17th century, proving a crucial source for salt that brought the Romans much wealth. Today, the Durgau lakes at the mine’s surface – responsible for much of the salt deposits in the area – are popular tourist attractions that guarantee a steady flow of visitors all year around. A trip down the vertical shafts that once transported thousands of tons of salt will slowly reveal the immense scale of the excavated earth, made blatantly clear upon reaching the very bottom of the mine which is covered in a sand-like layer of salt."
posted by moonmilk on Nov 30, 2013 - 26 comments

I'll have a burger and some of those yellow oily things.

The complexities of French Fries. We have the secret history, most outrageous, and the best. Now we've taken all the fries and put them in a fry museum, the newly opened Frietmuseum." Everything you've ever wanted to know about the fry."
posted by Xurando on Nov 3, 2013 - 46 comments

Creepy things in a museum? Never!

Including the wind-up friar automaton repeatedly claiming his faults and not one but two creeping baby dolls, the Smithsonian lists the 11 collection objects giving them the creeps this Halloween.
posted by Katemonkey on Oct 31, 2013 - 10 comments

Opening Day of The Guggenheim Museum

Opening Day of The Guggenheim Museum, 3:34 of color film shot on October 21, 1959 in NYC. “Buildings & Crowd” captures the their excitement as lines formed down Fifth Avenue. The end of the film highlights the inaugural exhibition within the rotunda. With works by Jean Arp, Constantin Brancusi, Marc Chagall, Stuart David, Max Ernst, Paul Klee, and Vasily Kandinsky.
posted by R. Mutt on Oct 21, 2013 - 2 comments

Suited for Space

The Smithsonian's National Air and Space museum is running an exhibit showing the ingenuity of design inherent in the spacesuits used by NASA astronauts. It includes some very cool x-ray photographs of the equipment by Mark Avino. [via]
posted by quin on Sep 4, 2013 - 16 comments

A “quiet” liquidation of 119 cars.

Using "under-the-radar" auctions, the Petersen Museum in L.A. is selling much of its classic car collection to finance an exterior renovation.
posted by xowie on Aug 1, 2013 - 20 comments

This is not a bad place, not the hell it had been..."

"Founded in 1912 as a farm colony of Brooklyn State Hospital, the Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens [New York] became, by mid-century, a world unto itself. At its peak, it housed some 7,000 patients. They tended gardens and raised livestock on the hospital’s grounds. The hospital contained gymnasiums, a swimming pool, a theater, a television studio, and giant kitchens and laundries where patients were put to work. Today, Creedmoor, still run by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has only a few hundred patients" and houses The Living Museum, an 'art asylum within an asylum' where patients can create and exhibit their art. But what is life like inside the institution itself? In 2010, Katherine B. Olsen spent weeks interviewing staff and patients. Her essay, published this week, 'Something More Wrong' takes us inside Creedmoor's women's ward. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 29, 2013 - 7 comments

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