8771 posts tagged with music.
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Because we were under the influence [...], we had little choice but to concentrate only on what we were playing and thus, did not move around a great deal.

Master's thesis on My Bloody Valentine's album Loveless (full thesis as pdf, html).
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Sep 25, 2006 - 86 comments

Satchmo in Music City

Country Music in Black and White. Read the story behind the intertwined roots of Jazz and Country when Louis Armstrong famously backed up Jimmie Rodgers for Blue Yodel No. 9. Then see how he came back to the historic Ryman Auditorium to do his final concert with none other than Johnny Cash. Finally be glad that you can see this meeting of giants online.
(last link is an embedded flash movie, some sites have flash, but no noise)
posted by 1f2frfbf on Sep 25, 2006 - 16 comments

Sounds from all around

If you're interested in musical instruments from all over the world, Wesleyan University's Virtual Instrument Museum should not be missed. Instruments are searchable by type (idiophones, aerophones, etc.), by materials (wood, bamboo, etc.), or by geographic region. The photos are very good, and many instruments are represented by excellent MP3 audio clips. And the exhibits (QTVR movies: drag your mouse to see the instrument from all angles) are wonderful.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 25, 2006 - 11 comments

Doo doodoo doodoodoo

When she walks, it's like a samba ... Links to 46 cover versions of the Girl from Ipanema.
posted by carter on Sep 25, 2006 - 38 comments

Indiepop songs about Thatcherism?

A Rough Guide to I Love Music's Rough Guides Never have to AskMe again for mix suggestions.
posted by klangklangston on Sep 23, 2006 - 21 comments

His, Mine, Yours, Ours

Inspired by comments Brian Eno made in his book A Year with Swollen Appendices, Duncan Sheik released White Limousine with two discs: One, a CD labeled Mine and the other a DVD labeled Yours. The former contains his stereo mixes, while the latter contains WAV files of the individual elements of the mixes for each song. Sheik is requesting that people remix his CD to their liking, and has even provided a place for people to upload their efforts. The best remixes will be streamed on the remix site, and some will even be released as downloads.
posted by terrapin on Sep 23, 2006 - 16 comments

make me a playlist!

annoyed by algorithms? finetune radio lets you create your own station and choose the tracks
posted by petsounds on Sep 22, 2006 - 10 comments

"Aroused, His Great Physical Strength Could Kill"

Closer, starring Kirk and Spock, courtesy of T. Jonesy and Killa, creators of the Star Trek Camelot video (previous MeFi link). If you haven't seen the original Nine Inch Nails Closer video directed by Mark Romanek, here it is. Both links YouTube, last link NSFW.
posted by fandango_matt on Sep 22, 2006 - 24 comments

Give My Regards to Yiddishe Broadway

I'm a Jewish Yankee Doodle Dandy and other Yiddish sheet music on topics ranging from the Dreyfus affair to interreligious romance. How Broadway evolved from Yiddish theater.
posted by jonp72 on Sep 22, 2006 - 10 comments

Hundreds of perfectly scanned "classical" music scores in PDF

Partituras - Hundreds of perfectly scanned "classical" music scores (and parts) in PDF. Chose a composer from the pop-up menu in the middle of the page to browse the available works by that composer.
posted by persona non grata on Sep 21, 2006 - 19 comments

Rolling Stone from Texas

'Pavarotti of the Plains' In 1957, Don Walser stopped recording country music and became a National Guardsman, just as rock 'n' roll took over the airwaves. He stayed with the Guard for 39 years, but around 1990, his performances at Henry's in Austin, Texas developed a following. By the end of the decade, he would sign to Sire Records, open for Ministry and the Butthole Surfers, collaborate with Kronos Quartet and be honored with a National Heritage Award. Walser retired from his music career in 2001 because of ill health. He passed away on Wednesday at age 72.
posted by NemesisVex on Sep 21, 2006 - 17 comments

They read the alt-weeklies so you don't have to

SonicLiving is a website which tracks live events (mostly shows) in your home town, and can read in tracks from your last.fm or pandora account to notify you of interesting shows coming up in your area, as long as your area is one of the currently-limited areas they cover. (vide intra)
posted by whir on Sep 21, 2006 - 13 comments

Music is the food of intelligent life?

Music makes you smarter if you get an early start. Certainly debatable given the incredibly small sample, but perhaps it's a prelude to an emerging 21st-century collaborative scientific suite or symphony that can explain why we love music so much.
posted by persona non grata on Sep 20, 2006 - 22 comments

y2karlTube - Simply Beautiful

Clarence Ashley - The Coo Coo
Skip James - Crow Jane
Howlin' Wolf - How Many More Years
Son House - John the Revelator
Bill Monroe & His Bluegrass Boys - Close By
Houston Stackhouse & Joe Willie Wilkins - Cool Drink Of Water
Muddy Waters - Honey Bee
Bob Wills & The Texas Playboys - Lone Star Rag
Mississipi John Hurt - You Got To Walk That Lonesome Valley
Maybelle & Sara Carter - Cannonball Blues
Al Green - Simply Beautiful
Enjoy. Note that, too, save for Mississippi John Hurt, there is more by each of the above artists linked on each clip's page.
The first is via FaheyGuitarPlayers, the rest were all in a day's surf. On dial-up, even.
posted by y2karl on Sep 20, 2006 - 73 comments

Cheesy Poofs

Futures, organic abstraction in motion in this music video directed by Robert Seidel (previously) for Zero 7.
posted by ijoshua on Sep 20, 2006 - 9 comments

Demi Moore Demo

Demi's Demo from 1982.
posted by eperker on Sep 19, 2006 - 26 comments

General themes are hard to make out, but isolated lines prove problematic.

Pre-marital sex! Eastern religious influences! Nods to Darwinian evolution! Spitefulness! In a world where rock music is poised to corrupt the souls of young America, the music review section of Plugged In Online (developed by Focus on the Family) promises to evaluate music not by melody, rhythm, beat or sound, but by the spirit of Colossians 2:8: "See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of this world rather than on Christ."
posted by apple scruff on Sep 18, 2006 - 69 comments

PLOrk: Yet more music made with computers.

PLOrk is the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, a group of students each wielding a laptop synthesizing multiple instruments. PLOrk makes recording of concerts and on-air performances available online.
posted by monju_bosatsu on Sep 16, 2006 - 3 comments

Young Ricky Skaggs performs with Flatt & Scruggs

In 1961, on the Martha White Show, seven year-old mandolin prodigy Ricky Skaggs performs two songs with Flatt & Scruggs. "Ruby" and "Foggy Mountain Special". [both songs direct to youtube]
posted by kosem on Sep 16, 2006 - 14 comments

The Finest of Worksongs

Tuesday was all about R.E.M. at the Fabulous 40 Watt in Athens, GA. Local musicians came together to celebrate a benefit CD release, a new CD/2CD/DVD release of R.E.M.'s early years, and R.E.M.'s induction into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. The Elephant Six Collective were there (darned near all of them) performing as The Observatory. Patterson Hood played, as did Five-Eight. And to start the show out right, R.E.M. themselves (even my fellow farmer Bill Berry) took to the stage. People in the audience (myself included) were feeling fine.
posted by ewagoner on Sep 15, 2006 - 56 comments

Bob Dylan Annnotated and Tablaturated

Artur J's Annotated Lyrics of Bob Dylans Love and Theft has expanded and now features Annotated lyrics for Street Legal, Knocked Out Loaded, Oh, Mercy and Modern Times. And he is already on top of Dylan's quotes of Henry Timrod on the new album. On a related tip, someone waved a lawyer at Eyolf Østrem, so he removed all his tabs from his Dylan tablature site, My Back Pages. But, fortunately there are some mirrors and the blog of this one has a tab page for Modern Times already.
posted by y2karl on Sep 14, 2006 - 13 comments

Awesome A Capella

UCLA's Awaken A Capella does some strange, beautiful things with the power of combined human voices. From Ave Maria to Mr Roboto, their oeuvre spans the spectrum. More clips, including Like a Prayer and Walk Like an Egyptian, available on their MySpace page. Their version of Imogen Heap's "Hide and Seek," available through KCRW's daily podcast, is sublime.
posted by gottabefunky on Sep 14, 2006 - 42 comments

Takeshi Terauchi and The Bunnys do Beethoven

Japanese Surf Versions of Classical Themes
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Sep 11, 2006 - 14 comments

Nerdcore Hiphop

MC Plus+ [superclass subgenre]
posted by riotgrrl69 on Sep 11, 2006 - 28 comments

Carlos Santana - Europa - Live

Europa (Earth's Cry, Heaven's Smile, YouTube...)
posted by persona non grata on Sep 10, 2006 - 29 comments

Traditional Qaawwali Performances from Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan

Mezmerizing videos of Qawwali master Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan along with lyrics and translation. More performances at youtube: 1, 2, 3, 4.
posted by kosem on Sep 10, 2006 - 24 comments

Her home is a factory.

The limits of pop music, and Marxist critical theory, by way of the Gang of Four.
posted by jmhodges on Sep 10, 2006 - 64 comments

Louis Gottschalk

Louis Moreau Gottschalk - an unjustly forgotten American composer of classical music
posted by Gyan on Sep 9, 2006 - 13 comments

Blogmusik: Just beggin' for a takedown!

Blogmusik is just what it says it is: a free internet virtual ipod. Search, find, play, save, make playlists. So good I feel like I am missing something.
posted by BrodieShadeTree on Sep 9, 2006 - 35 comments

You know that cool intro music for Monsters, Inc?

Ever heard of Andy Martin? Probably not. But have you ever watched Family Guy or King of the Hill, or watched movies such as Spiderman, The Day After Tomorrow, or Monsters, Inc? Andy is on all of them. Trombonist Martin is one of many studio musicians (aka session musicians) in the LA area who are called upon day after day to record the music that we take for granted. Although it may not be the most fulfilling job, it pays the bills, and for someone with a talent as relatively obscure as trombone playing (or clarinet playing, or drumming, or anything else), it's one of the few careers left. Even so, drummer Russ Miller reminds us that studio musicians are rapidly being replaced by synthesizers (Hans Zimmer's score for Gladiator, for instance, uses lots of synths in lieu of real players) and that "we don't have the luxury of just playing our instrument like we used to".
posted by rossination on Sep 8, 2006 - 26 comments

The Mellotron

You may have never heard of it, but you've damn near certain heard it. The Mellotron (FortuneCity link) is a keyboard instrument; each of its keys triggers a tape with a pre-recorded instrument on it. It was effectively the world's first sample player. [more inside]
posted by goodnewsfortheinsane on Sep 7, 2006 - 38 comments

44 minute singles, working with the KLF, and now a Podcast!

The Orb, known as one of the principal architects of ambient house, have receded into relative obscurity since the popular heyday of the electronic music movement in the US. Despite changes in the lineup - the group now consists of a duo featuring founding member Dr (Duncan Robert) Alex Paterson and Thomas Fehlmann. Paterson's DJ sets are the stuff of legend and I was pleased as punch that they've just put together a podcast (actually a 50.8mb .zip file containing an mp3) that's available through their minimal website.
posted by beaucoupkevin on Sep 7, 2006 - 36 comments

Woo-ooo-ooo yeah yeah yeah

No language, just sound: How writer Ned Raggett came to ignore the lyrics.
posted by klangklangston on Sep 6, 2006 - 79 comments

The Science of a Human Obsession

Daniel Levitin is a musical neurologist. His new book, This is Your Brain on Music, has an intriguing premise, and a very entertaining website.
posted by owhydididoit on Sep 5, 2006 - 12 comments

Loud Noises Hurt Ears!

"MP3 players should carry warnings that users risk damage to their hearing by having the volume too high, a deafness charity says." Also, for prescription glasses: "If you use these glasses to see things that are disturbing, you could become disturbed." Is this not the height of PC, Western stupidity?
posted by JPowers on Sep 5, 2006 - 74 comments

Musical Context via YouTube

This was the music of my childhood, along with massive infusions of Psalty the Singing Songbook and the Donut Man. During adolescence, my musical range expanded only slightly to include nashville country, teen pop, and the odd intersections between the two. YouTube has been an invaluable resource for expanding my previously limited horizons, from the productions which marked Michael Jackson's rise and fall to the birth and growing pains of the west coast rap scene. My favorite Youtube musical discovery thus far, however, is this pseudo-impromptu live rendition of Arthur's Theme.
posted by The Confessor on Sep 4, 2006 - 20 comments

This is the new [iTunes].

MySpace has announced that it intends to sell the music of nearly 3 million unsigned bands who use the service as an alternative to iTunes. If nothing else, at least Metafilter should see an end to these sorts of links.
posted by Second Account For Making Jokey Comments on Sep 3, 2006 - 54 comments

"Skeet Spirit: A Crunk Tribute to Radiohead" by DJ Gyngyvytus.

"Skeet Spirit: A Crunk Tribute to Radiohead" by DJ Gyngyvytus. And it's free!
posted by JPowers on Sep 2, 2006 - 57 comments

The album's title is taken from a line by the poet Apollinaire

So Much Fire To Roast Human Flesh from Arthur Magazine--an 18-track, multi-artist compilation CD curated by Foster featuring exclusive contributions from some of the more outspoken members of the nation's burgeoning psychedelic folk scene, ... All profits will be distributed to specific counter-military recruitment and pacifist organizations and programs who effectively advise high school students and other Americans at risk of being taken advantage of ... (and you can listen here). Some might remember Arthur vs. Godsmack--their music is heavily featured in recruiting ads.
posted by amberglow on Sep 1, 2006 - 8 comments

iNapsterTunes

Musicast turns your iTunes (mac only) into a music sharing server that conveniently spits out a podcast feed for your friends to subscribe and download all your mp3s from. Download this quick before the RIAA kills the server something might happen to this wonderful app.
posted by mathowie on Aug 30, 2006 - 37 comments

That wild mercury sound.

"'It's metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up.'" Louis Menand on the mercurial nature of Bob Dylan's interviews.
"Dylan's sound [is] 'very much like a dog with his leg caught in barbed wire.'" Nat Hentoff's profile of Dylan for the New Yorker from 1964.
posted by OmieWise on Aug 30, 2006 - 32 comments

Folk Music is Not Brown!

Colour Player: at last, you can organize your music by its color.
posted by signal on Aug 29, 2006 - 12 comments

Ruined Music.

We've all got one... Almost everyone's got a song with a story - a song that's been ruined by something awful associated with it. This site is the place to share your story...
posted by blaneyphoto on Aug 29, 2006 - 43 comments

Good for Goodie

However interesting your life is, it probably pales in comparison to Moondog. A homeless, blind composer who transcribed in braille, he went from a career as a street corner musician in New York, to sitting in Carnegie Hall for rehersals at the invitation of Artur Rodzinski, he was invited to Germany and wrote a symphony for four conductors: "The Overtone Tree", he was covered by Janis Joplin and worked with Julie Andrews. (mi)
posted by 1f2frfbf on Aug 29, 2006 - 13 comments

Prison Songs

That's the Sound of the Man Working on the Chain Gang Among all genres of American folk music, prison songs may be the most viscerally compelling. They evolved from plantation songs and field hollers of slaves in the American South before the civil war (whose origins can in turn be traced to patterns found in the music of West Africa) but their tone and content is quite different. Limitless in length, bitter and pained, offering little hope of freedom or redemption, these songs were first heard during Reconstruction. Harsh and unevenly enforced laws incarcerated legions of black American men, consigning them to long sentences of labor for minor offenses like insult, fistfighting, and shoplifting. To shore up a tanking Southern economy, prisons leased convict labor to plantation owners as a low-cost replacement for slave labor. When reform efforts brought that to an end, state governments became the contractors. Sweetheart deals awarded lucrative contracts to prisons to provide labor for rebuilding the railroads and highways of the war-destroyed South. Slavery in all but name, these work conditions gave rise to a body of music that is one of the most significant antecedents of the blues. In hundreds of variants, cadenced to axe-fall, hoe stroke, or the drop of a maul, the songs set a working pace a man could sustain from dawn to dusk, while remaining fast enough to satisfy an armed 'Captain' on horseback.
posted by Miko on Aug 27, 2006 - 33 comments

Aciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiid

Raves not dead! The British subculture the government tried so hard to kill is alive and well in Cornwall and Essex.
posted by Artw on Aug 27, 2006 - 74 comments

Dub Selector

Dub Selector - a flash based dub...sampler toy thingie. 9 tracks to play with.
posted by Bugbread on Aug 27, 2006 - 19 comments

Just a girl?

Muse + 120% pitch shift = Gwen Stefani
posted by mr.marx on Aug 26, 2006 - 77 comments

y2karl's 78 RPM jukebox-o-rama

For murder ballads, here's your Mississippi John Hurt's Louis Collins and your Grayson & Whitter's Ommie Wise. Then, for some early white blues bottleneck guitar, here's your Frank Hutchison's K. C. Blues. Not to mention Charley Patton's Screamin' And Hollerin' The Blues. All courtesy the Internet Archives 78 RPM tag. where there is way more--like Bix Beiderbecke's first record, Davenport Blues, Louis Armstrong's Ain't Misbehavin' and Geeshie Wiley's Last Kind Words, among many others. Then, for more, Nugrape Records has an mp3 page. The standout there, at least for me, is Gus Cannon's Poor Boy Long Ways From Home. As for their namesake, the Nugrape Twins, well, the Archive has the mp3 of I've Got Your Ice Cold Nugrape. And don't let me omit mentioning PublicDomain4U. They have Mississippi John Hurt's Frankie, for one. Tyrone's Record and Phonograph Links will lead you to more 78 RPM goodness. And don't forget the inestimable and erudite vacapinta first directed us to Dismuke's Virtual Talking Machine.
posted by y2karl on Aug 25, 2006 - 48 comments

Boop Boop Ba Doo

Helen Kane. (Wikipedia bio.) They based Betty Boop on her. MP3 files. WAV files. Podcast.
posted by Astro Zombie on Aug 25, 2006 - 11 comments

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