8054 posts tagged with music.
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Devo meets Dr. Evil meets the Oompa Loompas

The music video to the song Los Villanos, by a band called Poolpo, is pretty damn joyous. I like it and I hope you like it too.
posted by rorgy on Feb 26, 2015 - 7 comments

So long, Wolfman, so long

Today we bid a sad farewell to the last of the old-school Mississippi Hill Country bluesmen: Mr. Robert Belfour was a purveyor or that gritty, driving, riff-based, often one-chord Hill Country style pioneered by people like Mississippi Fred McDowell, and in more recent years popularized by artists like RL Burnside, Junior Kimbrough and Jessie Mae Hemphill. Let's take a listen, then, as we pay our respects to the "Wolfman", to some of his rocking, soulful blues. Here's Black Mattie, I Got My Eyes On You, Hill Stomp, Go Ahead On, My Baby's Gone, Done Got Old and You Got Me Crying. And here's an hour-long recording from February 2013, via NPR: Robert Belfour: Live In Concert.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 25, 2015 - 13 comments

Brian Eno on the dangers of digital

Digital technology has enhanced music production, recording and distribution in ways unimaginable just a few decades ago, but are we losing something more essential in the process? Chris May (of The Vinyl Factory) talks to ambient pioneer and friend of technology Brian Eno about the dangers of digital dependence in modern music. “It doesn’t just apply with African recordings. It’s a problem everybody is having at the moment. Do I resist the temptation to perfect this thing? What do I lose by perfecting it?"
posted by misterbee on Feb 25, 2015 - 50 comments

small zeppelin

Kashmir + The Ocean performed by 50-plus percussive pre-teens. Straight outa Louisville. Note the seriousness of purpose.
posted by philip-random on Feb 23, 2015 - 39 comments

Still a brand new record for 1990

Flood Live in Australia. They Might Be Giants has released a live cover of their album, Flood. Songs are recorded in reverse order because, you know, Australia.
posted by CrunchyFrog on Feb 23, 2015 - 16 comments

Ganges Delta Blues - from A Meeting By The River

This is a piece of magical music VooDoo by Ry Cooder and VM Bhatt. [more inside]
posted by bobdow on Feb 21, 2015 - 12 comments

Don't call it a comeback, I've been here for years

Flula with his Mama & Papa (on the accordion) - "Mama Said Knock You Out", and Flula with Sir Mix-A-Lot - "Baby Got Back (remix)", more autotunes (playlist).
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 21, 2015 - 11 comments

Every Letter, A Place

SLYT: Jerusalem singer Victoria Hanna's music video - Aleph-bet (Hosha'ana) [more inside]
posted by rosswald on Feb 21, 2015 - 4 comments

Pearl and The Beard (SLYT)

Pearl and The Beard are awesome Blending folk, gospel, pop, and Americana, eclectic Brooklyn-based trio Pearl & the Beard formed in the late 2000s around multi-instrumentalists Jeremy Styles, Jocelyn Mackenzie, and Emily Hope Price. Employing an arsenal that includes glockenspiel, guitar, cello, accordion, melodica, and pitch-perfect three-part harmonies, the band's skillful and soulful brand of acoustic art pop has drawn comparisons to artists like Andrew Bird, Beirut, Bonnie "Prince" Billy, and the Low Anthem.
posted by bobdow on Feb 20, 2015 - 15 comments

I Áⓜ s1𝕋𝕋𝓲6 i𝔫 tⓗẾ ℳo𝕽ǹⒾ𝕟🄶 a𝒯 ⒯h𝔼 𝒟ⅈ𝓝Ⓔ𝐑 0𝗡 Ⓣℋe 𝗖Ớ🆁𝚗Ḛℜ

The Ghost in the MP3 [warning, flashing imagery] — "moDernisT" was created by salvaging the sounds and images lost to compression via the MP3 and MP4 codecs. The audio is comprised of lost mp3 compression material from the song "Tom's Diner" famously used as one of the main controls in the listening tests to develop the MP3 encoding algorithm. Here we find the form of the song intact, but the details are just remnants of the original. The video is the MP4 ghost of a corresponding video created in collaboration with Takahiro Suzuki. Thus, both audio and video are the "ghosts" of their respective compression codecs.
posted by tonycpsu on Feb 19, 2015 - 24 comments

Jim O’Rourke Live in Tokyo in June of 2014 [Part 1] [Part 2] Jim O’Rourke Plays “Women of the World” (Live on Christmas Day, 2013). Jim O’Rourke at Work on the Grizzly Man Soundtrack; Special Appearance by Werner Herzog. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 19, 2015 - 7 comments

"A bone that you can’t swallow and you can’t spit out."

"[B]ecause he stays within the religious world, Lipa Schmeltzer is more of a threat to the Hasidic way of life than those who up and leave the faith." Author Batya Ungar-Sargon on Lipa Schmeltzer, [YouTube, also embedded in article] the Hasidic pop star (and now Columbia University student) facing a conservative backlash from rabbinical authorities in his home community, even as his popularity in the Orthodox world soars. [more inside]
posted by spitbull on Feb 18, 2015 - 28 comments

London Grammar live performance in the KEXP Studios

London Grammar is amazing live in the KEXP Studios English trio London Grammar combine sparse electronic pop in the model of The XX with dramatic, big-voiced lead singer Hannah Reid, whose vocals evoke contemporaries Florence Welch and Natasha Khan of Bat for Lashes. Here, they play a beautifully restrained set and leave the KEXP annpouncer speechless. If you like this, check out their cover of Wicked Game
posted by bobdow on Feb 18, 2015 - 22 comments

Russian Spring

Pussy Riot's new song 'I Can't Breathe', their first in English, is an ‘Industrial ballad’ inspired by Eric Garner. Q&A. Behind the scenes of the video shoot.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 18, 2015 - 4 comments

such is the cost of the Experiment

Why Chance The Rapper Is Forgoing Solo Fame To Make Jazzy Songs With Friends (Chance previously) [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Feb 17, 2015 - 7 comments

Richard Dawson and his music

Black Dog in the Sky; Final Moments of the Universe; The Vile Stuff; Wooden Bag; Poor Old Horse: some songs by the English (specifically Geordie) singer & guitarist Richard Dawson. ‘[A] distinctly English folk equivalent of Captain Beefheart’s deconstruction of the blues,’ opines The Guardian, of his recent album Nothing Important. ‘Syd Barrett’s freewheeling poetry teamed with the guitar strangle of Eugene Chadbourne or Derek Bailey’ hazards Rolling Stone. Of his own work, Dawson has said ‘I have come to think of it as ritual community music. Perhaps you could call that folk music, but it is certainly not in the folk tradition. I hope it belongs to part of a wider tradition of north east artists, people like Jospeh Crawhall, Jack Common, Basil Bunting, John Martin and Peter Beardsley.’
posted by misteraitch on Feb 17, 2015 - 15 comments

Reginald D. Hunter's Songs of the South

In a three-part series on BBC2 in the UK over February and March, Reginald D. Hunter travels across the (USA) south and explores the music and culture. There is a bunch of intriguing clips in advance. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Feb 16, 2015 - 7 comments

Lesley Gore (1946-2015)

Lesley Gore, who sang "It's My Party" (live performance) and "You Don't Own Me," which Wikipedia calls a "proto-feminist" song (live performance + more), died of lung cancer at age 68 today in New York City. [more inside]
posted by John Cohen on Feb 16, 2015 - 78 comments

Boom Bap

Samplestitch maps hip-hop samples (from J. Dilla, 9th Wonder and Kanye West) to keyboard buttons.
posted by box on Feb 16, 2015 - 10 comments

Music Workshop - FEZ

Are you interested in making ambient, drifting, densely-layered electronic music? But don't know where to even start? This is the most thoughtful and gentle introduction I'm aware of, from a fine musician. It's a 45-minute video workshop from Rich Vreeland aka Disasterpeace, composer of the gorgeous, acclaimed Fez soundtrack. Rich composes a Fez-like track on the fly, explaining what he's doing in the process. While he uses Logic and the softsynth Massive in this workshop, his general approach and attention to sound design and synthesis will be applicable to whatever software or hardware you choose to use. (Hat tip to sparkletone for the link. Fez previously on Metafilter.)
posted by naju on Feb 16, 2015 - 36 comments

“I just wanted to be near you”

Sufjan Stevens has released a new track, "No Shade In The Shadow of the Cross", from his forthcoming album Carrie & Lowell. The album is named for Stephens's mother and stepfather, and the musician recently spoke with Ryan Dombal at Pitchfork about his past and the album's origins.
posted by Going To Maine on Feb 16, 2015 - 26 comments

Found Star

But perhaps most intolerable to him was the insistence by the industry itself — "the big businesses that run these corporations and multinationals that own the record companies and all of the conduits through which artists get their music out there" — that he and other artists "whore out" themselves in order to continue to make art. An example? "Things like doing station P.A.s, you know, where you have to go, 'You're hangin' with The Party Pig!' [The Party Pig was the mascot for the LA area's now-defunct KQLZ 100.3 AM.] You know? 'This is Gregg from The New Radicals and you're hangin' with The Party Pig!' [more inside]
posted by smcg on Feb 16, 2015 - 54 comments

The Medieval Citole

Studying and making an early instrument called a citole. Until recently, this style of instrument was not recognized as separate from a gittern.
posted by Peregrine Pickle on Feb 15, 2015 - 26 comments

[EPILEPSY WARNING] This LSD makes me think I'm on this video

The video for composer and electronic musician Dan Deacon's new single "Learning to Relax" is a dazzling display of pulsating colors. [more inside]
posted by JauntyFedora on Feb 15, 2015 - 26 comments

A cappella Cardiacs

A cappella renditions of songs off the Cardiacs album Sing to God, aka the best album you've never heard of. The original double album (Part I, Part II) is arguably the band's magnum opus, inspiring (among other things) parts of Radiohead's OK Computer; these renditions capture some of the glorious derangement of the originals, and add all manner of delightful innovations to the material. Don't miss: Fiery Gun Hand, Insect Hoofs on Lassie, Wireless, Dirty Boy, Nurses Whispering Verses.
posted by rorgy on Feb 14, 2015 - 20 comments

What do we do now? / Now we're ten years older / The bands we loved are dead

After eight years, 57 releases, and a successful kickstarter, the purveyor of soft and sweet indiepop music WeePOP! Records is closing shop today. To celebrate, they've put together a retrospective mix in two parts for your enjoyment: Part 1 and Part 2. [more inside]
posted by vibratory manner of working on Feb 13, 2015 - 7 comments

Shoegazers in their own words

An Oral History of Shoegaze In this oral history, Wondering Sound speaks with the bands and other figures on the margins of “the scene that celebrates itself” to discover from whence this distinctive sound sprung, and why it has stood the test of time.
posted by psmealey on Feb 13, 2015 - 35 comments

Fade To Grey

RIP Steve Strange lead singer of 80's synth pop band Visage and manager of the Blitz club a focal point for the New Romantic movement.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 12, 2015 - 28 comments

Words and Music

Words and Music is an album by the artist David Shrigley (previously on metafilter) and the musician Malcolm Middleton, featuring spoken-word tracks such as A Toast, Monkeys and Story Time (all songs nsfw, full album stream in the first link).
posted by dng on Feb 12, 2015 - 4 comments

The musicians you don’t know will bore you to death

We as a society are expected to believe that live shows are fun, even though they’re basically loud, plotless museum exhibits with no chairs and no rules about whether people should yell a conversation at you. In your innermost self, you know this truth. But if you’d like ammunition to make the case to your friends and loved ones, or if you just need to read it on the internet, what follows is an airtight case as to why live music is the grownup birthday dinner of cultural events.
Live music sucks.
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 12, 2015 - 206 comments

not friendly

This is a story about a lost cat, by Advance Base.
posted by theodolite on Feb 11, 2015 - 20 comments

The Mystery of Mingering Mike

Hader was a true soul aficionado, with an encyclopaedic knowledge and 10,000 records at home. Which is why he was so amazed to discover 38 albums by a soul singer he had never heard of. His name was Mingering Mike. Hader stared at the record covers. He read the liner notes. There was Mingering Mike’s 1968’s debut, Sit’tin by the Window. The cover art was a painting of a young man in a green T-shirt, good-looking, serious. The comedian Jack Benny had written the liner notes, calling him “a bright and intelligent young man with a great, exciting future awaiting him”.
Jon Ronson looks at the story of Mingering Mike (SLGrauniad), a long-lost soul singer whose records were found at a flea market in 2003, but who turned out to not actually have existed. [more inside]
posted by acb on Feb 11, 2015 - 19 comments

"Garrison Keillor for the young and expensively educated"

Ten years ago, (MeFi's own) John Hodgman (previously) and Jonathan Coulton (previously) created a series of podcasts documenting Hodgman's Little Gray Books spoken-word series:

One: We Remember: How to Generate a Winning Character
Two: We Remember: Secrets of the Secret Agents
Three: We Remember: How to Negotiate All Kinds of Deals and Contracts
Four: We Remember: Hints on Public Singing
Five: We Remember: Brookline: the Town that Has Everything Yet at the Same Time Has Nothing
Six: We Remember: The Countries of Europe Described
Seven: We Remember: How to Observe Presidents Day (Observed)

More about the series here.
posted by carrienation on Feb 11, 2015 - 7 comments

Oops - I had to bodliboodblibeep!

Louis Prima and Keely Smith attempt to sing "I'm In the Mood For Love." From Louis Prima - The Wildest documentary
posted by Mchelly on Feb 11, 2015 - 19 comments

So, um... Happy Valentines Day, I guess...

Put down the boom box: 28 romantic gestures from Film, Television and Music that are actually creepy (SingleLinkAVClub)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 11, 2015 - 105 comments

Waiting For A Train

A short documentary about Toshio Hirano, The Japanese Jimmy Rodgers.
posted by TheCoug on Feb 10, 2015 - 8 comments

big ass changes, y'all, big ass changes

You say you don't t like jazz? Too much harmonic complexity just winds up making everything sound like scrambled eggs? Well, I've got something gonna make you change your mind. Right here.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 9, 2015 - 37 comments

Proof that The Beatles traveled through time, from 1964 to 1994

Over 50 years ago, The Beatles arrived in New York for their first US visit, but what if ....
Having departed Heathrow on the 7th February 1964, John Lennon, in a playful mood, ordered the pilot to divert the plane via the Bermuda Triangle. Newly declassified documents reveal that Pan Am Flight 101 disappeared from US radar screens shortly after midday, local time. At great expense we have obtained – from reliable Russian mafia sources – an MP3 copy of the black box recorder of that ill-fated Boeing 707. This indicates that as far as those aboard the plane knew, after experiencing severe cyclonic turbulence over the Atlantic Ocean, they re-routed towards New York, believing themselves to have narrowly avoided aeronautical disaster. But on arriving at JFK airport, they were stunned to learn that they had arrived in the year 1994.
That's the premise of An Adventure To Pepperland Through Rhyme & Space, a two-hour ill-trippy musical adventure with golden era hip-hop musicians, from P.E. to Spoonie Gee, Tha Liks to Hieroglyphics and Large Professor to Salt n Pepa, courtesy of Tom Caruna, also the artist behind Enter the Magical Mystery Chamber (previously, and still online)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 9, 2015 - 14 comments

Microtonal Wall

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves. [more inside]
posted by OverlappingElvis on Feb 9, 2015 - 56 comments

Lossless, lossless, lossless

"You know how every once in a while you buy the $40 bottle of wine instead of the $8 one, thinking you're gonna have a special dinner or something?" Senior Reviews Editor Lee Hutchinson wrote over instant message. "And you get home, and you make the salmon or the pasta or whatever and you light the candles? And you pour the wine, swirl it like they do in Sideways so that it looks like you know what you're doing... you bring it to your lips and after smelling it—it smells like wine—you have a sip? And it's like… yeah, I guess this tastes good or something, but really it just tastes like wine?
"The Pono Player is kinda like that, but for music."
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 9, 2015 - 206 comments

Conversing with a musician's musician

Ry Cooder shares an hour of vignettes about skipping school in the '50s to teach himself guitar by listenting to hillbilly radio, how he came to work with Flaco Jiminez, being schooled by the old time Cuban musicians in the Buena Vista Social Club recording and more. Music journalist Barry Mazor draws him out about his 50-year career in a delightful and highly entertaining chat - an hour didn't seem nearly long enough.
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 8, 2015 - 6 comments

Dreadful Sorry, Clementine

The Sweptaways, a Swedish group of "20 women singing choir pop songs," offer a unique take on the American folk song "Oh My Darling, Clementine." [more inside]
posted by banal retentive on Feb 8, 2015 - 29 comments

"The black communities were just too difficult to work in"

“[M]uch of the music he recorded this way, including many blues and work songs, are powerful expressions of overlooked cultures. But his quest for a ‘pure’ black music untouched by white influences was problematic... This much is undeniable: right at the time the Civil Rights movement was trying to bring whites and blacks together in a common cause, Lomax drew a hard line between white music and black music that — with help from the record companies — helped keep us apart.” How Alan Lomax Segregated Music.
posted by koeselitz on Feb 8, 2015 - 55 comments

The flamenco of Sevilla

Soleá follows an aspiring flamenco guitarist around the streets of Sevilla. "Ten years playing for dancers, ten years playing for singers, and, afterward, you can begin to become a soloist." A short video from The New Yorker (alt link).
posted by carter on Feb 8, 2015 - 7 comments

1969 was a year giants rocked the earth, and they wanted big amps.

The biggest, loudest, nastiest, heaviest amps the world had ever seen. How The Rolling Stones accidentally ended up using Ampeg amplifiers for their 1969 US tour, creating a sound preserved on their Get Yer Ya Ya's Out album.
posted by colie on Feb 6, 2015 - 88 comments

Slo-flanged psychouts with grandparents and children

In 2013, cell phone footage emerged on the Dangerous Minds blog of The Khun Narin Electric Phin Band playing what appeared to be fuzzed-out, homemade psychedelic rock from the Isan region of northeastern Thailand. The recordings led sound engineer Josh Marcy to track down the band, who turned out to be a loose collective of motorcycle taxi drivers, carpenters, and priests, and field-record an album, the first half of which can be streamed here. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Feb 5, 2015 - 22 comments

The Roundest Pickled Egg

A song about a pickled egg, by British comedy musician Elliot Mason, which devotees of Devo, Information Society, the Tiger Lillies, the sketch show Jam, and/or vintage Dr. Demento may enjoy.
posted by gusandrews on Feb 4, 2015 - 14 comments

some damn fine music from Mauritania

Have you heard Noura Mint Seymali? She's a singer from Mauritania, and neither she nor her band pull any punches. Just fire up "Eguetmar", the first track on her album Tzenni, and dig that gritty, undulating electric guitar: Mauritanian through and through, but reminiscent of the blues and/or psychedelic stylings of the 60s, in just the right way. Then there's the beats: drumming so funky and syncopated, but in such a languidly relaxed way, that it harkens back to the way Ziggy Modeliste worked his drum magic with New Orleans funk legends the Meters. And, of course, Noura's voice: a bold, soaring and self-assured force of nature: stunning. Not to mention her masterful playing of the ardine, a 9-string Mauritanian harp providing delicate, spindly showers of notes that shimmer like droplets on a spider web. Please enjoy: Tzenni.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 4, 2015 - 28 comments

Music Video with thrash and humorous elements

IRON REAGAN - "Miserable Failure" (SLYT)
posted by josher71 on Feb 4, 2015 - 25 comments

Hot Dog: the Music Video

Shred Kelly, a "five-piece "stoke-folk," banjo-driven band from the ski-bum town of Fernie, B.C" have just put out a video for their song Sing to the Night, which may not be the most Canadian video of all time, but it's still a lot of fun, and a bravura piece of one-shot backwards-skiing stoke-folk film-making.
posted by Flashman on Feb 4, 2015 - 19 comments

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