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This is a story about a lost cat, by Advance Base.
posted by theodolite on Feb 11, 2015 - 20 comments

The Mystery of Mingering Mike

Hader was a true soul aficionado, with an encyclopaedic knowledge and 10,000 records at home. Which is why he was so amazed to discover 38 albums by a soul singer he had never heard of. His name was Mingering Mike. Hader stared at the record covers. He read the liner notes. There was Mingering Mike’s 1968’s debut, Sit’tin by the Window. The cover art was a painting of a young man in a green T-shirt, good-looking, serious. The comedian Jack Benny had written the liner notes, calling him “a bright and intelligent young man with a great, exciting future awaiting him”.
Jon Ronson looks at the story of Mingering Mike (SLGrauniad), a long-lost soul singer whose records were found at a flea market in 2003, but who turned out to not actually have existed. [more inside]
posted by acb on Feb 11, 2015 - 19 comments

"Garrison Keillor for the young and expensively educated"

Ten years ago, (MeFi's own) John Hodgman (previously) and Jonathan Coulton (previously) created a series of podcasts documenting Hodgman's Little Gray Books spoken-word series:

One: We Remember: How to Generate a Winning Character
Two: We Remember: Secrets of the Secret Agents
Three: We Remember: How to Negotiate All Kinds of Deals and Contracts
Four: We Remember: Hints on Public Singing
Five: We Remember: Brookline: the Town that Has Everything Yet at the Same Time Has Nothing
Six: We Remember: The Countries of Europe Described
Seven: We Remember: How to Observe Presidents Day (Observed)

More about the series here.
posted by carrienation on Feb 11, 2015 - 7 comments

Oops - I had to bodliboodblibeep!

Louis Prima and Keely Smith attempt to sing "I'm In the Mood For Love." From Louis Prima - The Wildest documentary
posted by Mchelly on Feb 11, 2015 - 19 comments

So, um... Happy Valentines Day, I guess...

Put down the boom box: 28 romantic gestures from Film, Television and Music that are actually creepy (SingleLinkAVClub)
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 11, 2015 - 105 comments

Waiting For A Train

A short documentary about Toshio Hirano, The Japanese Jimmy Rodgers.
posted by TheCoug on Feb 10, 2015 - 8 comments

big ass changes, y'all, big ass changes

You say you don't t like jazz? Too much harmonic complexity just winds up making everything sound like scrambled eggs? Well, I've got something gonna make you change your mind. Right here.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 9, 2015 - 37 comments

Proof that The Beatles traveled through time, from 1964 to 1994

Over 50 years ago, The Beatles arrived in New York for their first US visit, but what if ....
Having departed Heathrow on the 7th February 1964, John Lennon, in a playful mood, ordered the pilot to divert the plane via the Bermuda Triangle. Newly declassified documents reveal that Pan Am Flight 101 disappeared from US radar screens shortly after midday, local time. At great expense we have obtained – from reliable Russian mafia sources – an MP3 copy of the black box recorder of that ill-fated Boeing 707. This indicates that as far as those aboard the plane knew, after experiencing severe cyclonic turbulence over the Atlantic Ocean, they re-routed towards New York, believing themselves to have narrowly avoided aeronautical disaster. But on arriving at JFK airport, they were stunned to learn that they had arrived in the year 1994.
That's the premise of An Adventure To Pepperland Through Rhyme & Space, a two-hour ill-trippy musical adventure with golden era hip-hop musicians, from P.E. to Spoonie Gee, Tha Liks to Hieroglyphics and Large Professor to Salt n Pepa, courtesy of Tom Caruna, also the artist behind Enter the Magical Mystery Chamber (previously, and still online)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 9, 2015 - 14 comments

Microtonal Wall

1,500 speakers, each playing a single microtonal frequency, collectively spanning 4 octaves. [more inside]
posted by OverlappingElvis on Feb 9, 2015 - 56 comments

Lossless, lossless, lossless

"You know how every once in a while you buy the $40 bottle of wine instead of the $8 one, thinking you're gonna have a special dinner or something?" Senior Reviews Editor Lee Hutchinson wrote over instant message. "And you get home, and you make the salmon or the pasta or whatever and you light the candles? And you pour the wine, swirl it like they do in Sideways so that it looks like you know what you're doing... you bring it to your lips and after smelling it—it smells like wine—you have a sip? And it's like… yeah, I guess this tastes good or something, but really it just tastes like wine?
"The Pono Player is kinda like that, but for music."
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 9, 2015 - 206 comments

Conversing with a musician's musician

Ry Cooder shares an hour of vignettes about skipping school in the '50s to teach himself guitar by listenting to hillbilly radio, how he came to work with Flaco Jiminez, being schooled by the old time Cuban musicians in the Buena Vista Social Club recording and more. Music journalist Barry Mazor draws him out about his 50-year career in a delightful and highly entertaining chat - an hour didn't seem nearly long enough.
posted by madamjujujive on Feb 8, 2015 - 6 comments

Dreadful Sorry, Clementine

The Sweptaways, a Swedish group of "20 women singing choir pop songs," offer a unique take on the American folk song "Oh My Darling, Clementine." [more inside]
posted by banal retentive on Feb 8, 2015 - 29 comments

"The black communities were just too difficult to work in"

“[M]uch of the music he recorded this way, including many blues and work songs, are powerful expressions of overlooked cultures. But his quest for a ‘pure’ black music untouched by white influences was problematic... This much is undeniable: right at the time the Civil Rights movement was trying to bring whites and blacks together in a common cause, Lomax drew a hard line between white music and black music that — with help from the record companies — helped keep us apart.” How Alan Lomax Segregated Music.
posted by koeselitz on Feb 8, 2015 - 55 comments

The flamenco of Sevilla

Soleá follows an aspiring flamenco guitarist around the streets of Sevilla. "Ten years playing for dancers, ten years playing for singers, and, afterward, you can begin to become a soloist." A short video from The New Yorker (alt link).
posted by carter on Feb 8, 2015 - 7 comments

1969 was a year giants rocked the earth, and they wanted big amps.

The biggest, loudest, nastiest, heaviest amps the world had ever seen. How The Rolling Stones accidentally ended up using Ampeg amplifiers for their 1969 US tour, creating a sound preserved on their Get Yer Ya Ya's Out album.
posted by colie on Feb 6, 2015 - 88 comments

Slo-flanged psychouts with grandparents and children

In 2013, cell phone footage emerged on the Dangerous Minds blog of The Khun Narin Electric Phin Band playing what appeared to be fuzzed-out, homemade psychedelic rock from the Isan region of northeastern Thailand. The recordings led sound engineer Josh Marcy to track down the band, who turned out to be a loose collective of motorcycle taxi drivers, carpenters, and priests, and field-record an album, the first half of which can be streamed here. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Feb 5, 2015 - 22 comments

The Roundest Pickled Egg

A song about a pickled egg, by British comedy musician Elliot Mason, which devotees of Devo, Information Society, the Tiger Lillies, the sketch show Jam, and/or vintage Dr. Demento may enjoy.
posted by gusandrews on Feb 4, 2015 - 14 comments

some damn fine music from Mauritania

Have you heard Noura Mint Seymali? She's a singer from Mauritania, and neither she nor her band pull any punches. Just fire up "Eguetmar", the first track on her album Tzenni, and dig that gritty, undulating electric guitar: Mauritanian through and through, but reminiscent of the blues and/or psychedelic stylings of the 60s, in just the right way. Then there's the beats: drumming so funky and syncopated, but in such a languidly relaxed way, that it harkens back to the way Ziggy Modeliste worked his drum magic with New Orleans funk legends the Meters. And, of course, Noura's voice: a bold, soaring and self-assured force of nature: stunning. Not to mention her masterful playing of the ardine, a 9-string Mauritanian harp providing delicate, spindly showers of notes that shimmer like droplets on a spider web. Please enjoy: Tzenni.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 4, 2015 - 28 comments

Music Video with thrash and humorous elements

IRON REAGAN - "Miserable Failure" (SLYT)
posted by josher71 on Feb 4, 2015 - 25 comments

Hot Dog: the Music Video

Shred Kelly, a "five-piece "stoke-folk," banjo-driven band from the ski-bum town of Fernie, B.C" have just put out a video for their song Sing to the Night, which may not be the most Canadian video of all time, but it's still a lot of fun, and a bravura piece of one-shot backwards-skiing stoke-folk film-making.
posted by Flashman on Feb 4, 2015 - 19 comments

"Old Man, take a look at yourself, I'm a lot like you."

In the grand tradition of John Belushi and Joe Cocker, we now have Jimmy Fallon and Neil Young.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Feb 4, 2015 - 34 comments

Lady Mondegreen

The science of misheard lyrics (SL New Yorker)
posted by cozenedindigo on Feb 3, 2015 - 49 comments

The music behind the worst album covers (SLYT, partially NSFW)

Some of the music is worse than the worst album covers, which you'd think would be difficult [via]
posted by voferreira on Feb 3, 2015 - 40 comments

"...streets paved with a heart..."

Save the Heart of Lake Oswego: The Music Video [more inside]
posted by OverlappingElvis on Feb 2, 2015 - 13 comments

Things that sounded like what I heard on the news

Mark Mothersbaugh's Synth Collection (via)
posted by frimble on Feb 2, 2015 - 9 comments

Give me a beat

Audience can clap but ain't got no swing? No problem (if you're Harry Connick Jr.). (SLYT)
posted by swift on Feb 2, 2015 - 96 comments

"...a salute to the infinite..."

Carbon 7 is three musicians collaborating to produce cooperative music in real time. [via mefi projects] Metafilter's own Devils Rancher has provided access to some really great music that he's done with Austin musicians as collaborative, real-time recordings. It's loose, noodle-y, riff-y wonderfulness. Check out "Soundtrack to an Eclipse", and for fun you can see what the night sky looked like over Austin on the date it was recorded.
posted by ersatzkat on Feb 2, 2015 - 2 comments

Something out of nothing

A Sunday morning is a fine time to listen to Leonard Bernstein discuss Brahms' 4th symphony, complete with crackling vinyl noise.
posted by Wolfdog on Feb 1, 2015 - 8 comments

Jeff Porcaro

“It is no exaggeration to say that the sound of mainstream pop/rock drumming in the 1980s was, to a large extent, the sound of Jeff Porcaro.” — AllMusic [more inside]
posted by MattMangels on Feb 1, 2015 - 17 comments

1976 was a crap year for music, but it got better as I got older.

Rediscover your musical past. Enter your birthday with day and year and this fun site gives you what was popular from your date of birth right up to when you graduated college (provided that you went at all or didn't graduate like me).
posted by Kitteh on Jan 30, 2015 - 55 comments

How the War on Drugs targeted Billie Holiday

The Hunting of Billie Holiday. "How Lady Day found herself in the middle of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics’ early fight for survival." [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jan 29, 2015 - 9 comments

If You Want, We Can Pretend To Be Crows. No? Okay.

Jeff Bridges (The Dude himself) has released an album called Sleeping Tapes. It's a collaboration with Squarespace to raise money for No Kid Hungry. It's also deeply, deeply weird.
posted by Fuzzy Monster on Jan 29, 2015 - 61 comments

if only Soundcloud was higher quality than 128kbps

Aphex Twin is (apparently) unloading over 100 rare and unreleased tracks from his 20+ year vault, now streaming for free on Soundcloud. [more inside]
posted by SmileyChewtrain on Jan 29, 2015 - 77 comments

In C Mali

A documentary-esque, full-length music video for Africa Express's rendition of Terry Riley's In C.
The recording includes: Adama Koita on kamel n’goni; Alou Coulibaly on Calabash; Andi Toma on assorted percussion and kalimba; André d Ridder on violin, baritone-guitar, and kalimba, as well as conducting; Badou Mbaye (perhaps) on djembe and other percussion; Brian Eno, Bijou, and Olugbenga on vox; Cheick Diallo on flutes; Damon Albarn on melodica; Defily Sako and Modibo Diawara on kora; Guindo Sala on imzad; Kalifa Koné and Mémé Koné on balafon; and Nick Zinner and Jeff Wootton on guitar.
Olugbenga's diary of the trip. The WSJ on the group's origins. Previously
posted by Going To Maine on Jan 28, 2015 - 15 comments

“I’m sorry, I’m just so happy to see another brown person at Fest!”

Pilot Viruet writes about being black and punk. [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on Jan 27, 2015 - 14 comments

Albums That Never Were

Albums That Never Were [more inside]
posted by goethean on Jan 26, 2015 - 24 comments

SCREAM CHOIR

I thought this was ridiculous......until I realized that Artaud might have loved it. So maybe it's great. (SLYT) [more inside]
posted by crazylegs on Jan 24, 2015 - 16 comments

Genesis' The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway turned forty recently

The sixth Genesis studio album (and their last with Peter Gabriel), it's a two record, 94 minute conceptual monster which, "... tells of how a large black cloud descends into Time Square, straddles out across 42nd Street, turns into a wall and sucks in Manhattan Island. Our hero named Rael crawls out of the subways of New York and is sucked into the wall to regain consciousness underground." [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Jan 24, 2015 - 37 comments

reeeee~wind!!

"A good rewind is that rare thing in life: a product of the moment. If the timing is right, a rewind will bring excitement to the dancefloor, a celebration of the music being played, an energy charge for the place and the people." Laurent Fintoni goes deep on the history of pulling the record back across a variety of genres, from reggae and dub, to dubstep and hip-hop.
posted by raihan_ on Jan 23, 2015 - 5 comments

aphextwin

Diskhat ALL Prepared1mixed [snr2mix] Computer Controlled Acoustic Instruments Pt2
posted by Artw on Jan 22, 2015 - 25 comments

Mop Top Not

In the early 60s, the Beatles' signature haircuts rapidly became de rigueur for any and all rock bands seeking a crack at the big time. Conformity to the new look became, almost overnight, the norm. One band, though, said later for all that, and went for a truly radical look. That band, of course, was The Eggheads. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 22, 2015 - 48 comments

This is the thread about threads that dance across your screen

For your viewing pleasure: one music video made with sewing and embroidery tools, one music video made of sewing and embroidery tools.
posted by ocherdraco on Jan 21, 2015 - 6 comments

There'll be a hell of a Mardi Gras in heaven next month

It's time to say so long to legendary Mardi Gras Indian Big Chief Bo Dollis, who, for many years, led his Wild Magnolias through the streets of the Crescent City. Handa Wanda, Big Chief, Ho Na Nae and Jockomo Jockomo. Oops Upside Your Head [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 20, 2015 - 16 comments

Song name haiku

Song name haiku Pop in an artist, and it will generate haiku based on their song titles. Reload for more. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by mathowie on Jan 20, 2015 - 51 comments

That's Not What Joe Strummer Had in Mind

​​"From the pictures and videos that accompany the NBC News and Buzzfeed stories, the crowd appears to have been predominantly white... which explains why they're described in the media as 'celebrating' rather than 'rioting'. But every time this happens – that is to say, every time sports fans, predominantly of the white variety, go on rampages after wining (or losing) various championships – many of us with a few gray hairs on our heads are reminded of the Clash's seminal punk anthem, 'White Riot,' which was released as a 7-inch single (that would be on vinyl, kids) in March 1977, and was later included on both the UK and the US versions of the band's debut album, The Clash."​ Whites Riot: That’s Not What Joe Strummer Had in Mind, by David Von Ebers (TwiB! / Valid magazine).
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 19, 2015 - 28 comments

The trigonometry of relationsips. Who is responsible...?

Lusine's "Two Dots", illustrated by Britta Johnson.
posted by loquacious on Jan 19, 2015 - 8 comments

"Something different? What can we do different? Okay..."

​​Ella Fitzgerald - Air Mail Special (Club Des Belugas Remix) [SLYT]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 18, 2015 - 9 comments

The Bombay Royale, music for daring Bollywood-style adventures

Snakes! Bullets! Super secret agents! Bandits! Monkeys and tigers! Espionage and romance! Are you excited yet? Are you on the edge of your seat? Does this sound like a movie to you? Ah, these are the recurring themes in some of classic Bollywood’s greatest cinematic extravaganzas, where acting and plot took a backseat to some of the craziest, over-the-top song and dance scenes ever committed to celluloid. Enter The Bombay Royale, a local 11-piece musical powerhouse who have taken the themes and soundtracks from these films and have infused them with all the colour, production and energy one would expect from a four-plus hour Bollywood movie. The Bombay Royale had first set down to do strictly covers from the gilded ‘60s era of Bollywood, but soon evolved into writing their own material.
Sit down with Parvyn Kaur Singh AKA "The Mysterious Lady," one of the singers of the band, for an introduction to the cast of characters behind the albums You Me Bullets Love (Soundcloud; track-by-track description with musical director and saxophonist Andy Williamson, AKA "The Skipper") and The Island of Dr. Electrico (Soundcloud; a review of the Bollywood inspired surf / disco / funk album). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 18, 2015 - 12 comments

The Blues of Arabia: The history of sawt al-khaleej

If you climb into a taxi in Doha, capital of Qatar, and Arab music is on the driver’s radio, the station may well be 99.0, Sawt al-Khaleej, one of the most popular and powerful radio and digital streaming broadcast networks in the region. Based in Doha, its name translates to “Voice of the Gulf”—a fitting name for a network that seeks to appeal to a broad, Arabic-speaking audience with pan-Arab popular music up and down the eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, from Kuwait to Oman. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Jan 18, 2015 - 7 comments

Road trip

Yini Bo by French band / collective Le Peuple de l'Herbe (SLYT)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 18, 2015 - 7 comments

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