184 posts tagged with newspapers.
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The editor-at-large of The Spectator has resigned in protest at the publication of an anti-American article.

The editor-at-large of The Spectator has resigned in protest at the publication of an anti-American article. There has already been some discussion of this here but the British press seems to be tearing itself apart about how much to support the War on Terror, and what viewpoints it's acceptable to express. The offending article will presumably appear here sometime in the next few days, though its content is somewhat predictable given the views of the author. Funny quote: "I want to be in the magazine more often than I seem to be". Maybe the price of freedom is eternal whingeing.
posted by Gaz on Mar 13, 2002 - 11 comments

A print journalist admits her fear of blogs

A print journalist admits her fear of blogs "What the blog threatens to do is dislodge the traditional news media's corner on the "scoop" market. With their unorthodox reporting strategies and lightning-fast publishing schedules, blogs are making it clear that you don't need to have some big, fancy newspaper job to break stories. In fact, you don't even need to write stories; you can just throw a couple of sentences up on your site with some telling links. And you can quote that naked boy in your bed who knows how to hack protocols. Whatever."
posted by ezfowler on Mar 1, 2002 - 23 comments

Newspapers lose the web war.

Newspapers lose the web war. While newspapers recognized the risk the web posed to their core business, they often erred by forcing their new online ventures into the mold set by their pre-existing business model. A look at what made newspapers succeed or fail online from a Harvard Business School professor. (Warning: business-speak; via CNet.) Has your local newspaper done a good job on the web?
posted by mcwetboy on Feb 1, 2002 - 8 comments

An analysis of some of the web's limitations

An analysis of some of the web's limitations as a medium for publishing newspapers' content. It focuses on NewsStand, the service offering the NYTimes, the International Herald Tribune and others in PDF format, and says some interesting things about the respective formats' ease of use and ability to guide readers to what they're looking for. (It has me thinking, is HTML/CSS just too limited to do certain things well?)
posted by mattpfeff on Jan 8, 2002 - 13 comments

Why Don't People Read Newspapers from Other Countries?

Why Don't People Read Newspapers from Other Countries? The early promise of the Web was that it would create a smaller world. Yet, most individuals read their local newspaper or their favorite national newspaper online. For example, most people I speak to are surprised that there are English newspapers in Pakistan- there are at least two good ones- Dawn and The Friday Times. I see a lot of posts on MeFi from UK papers such as The Guardian and also from Australian papers. How about the English newspapers from the rest of the world? Have we stopped browsing?
posted by SandeepKrishnamurthy on Dec 4, 2001 - 45 comments

Here Comes the Sun

Here Comes the Sun Beware NY Times. Watch your flanks NY liberal establishment. Lord Conrad Black to back Smarter Times Ira Stoll and co in new conservative daily paper. Will they make it? (PS. Apparently are looking for editorial staff "willing to work long hours in an entrepreneurial, start-up environment") Start spreadin' the news, these little town blues are melting away, it's up to you, New York, New York...
posted by Voyageman on Dec 4, 2001 - 15 comments

Ask the ombudsman.

Ask the ombudsman. Are newspapers revealing too much information? too little? A news ombudsman receives and investigates complaints from newspaper readers or listeners or viewers of radio and television stations about accuracy, fairness, balance and good taste in news coverage. He or she recommends appropriate remedies or responses to correct or clarify news reports. Michael Getler: Internal Critic with Big Audience: how the Washington Post's Ombudsman does his job. An ombudsman is someone who handles complaints and attempts to find mutually satisfactory solutions. Ombudsmen can be found in government, corporations, hospitals, universities and other institutions. The first ombudsman was appointed in 1809 in Sweden to handle citizens' complaints about the government. It is pronounced "om-BUDS-man" and is Scandinavian in origin.
posted by Carol Anne on Oct 30, 2001 - 2 comments

There's now an electronic version of The New York Times for people who like to read the paper version of The New York Times on their computer. (Yes, you read that correctly.) Is this really necessary? Who would use such a service, much less pay 65ยข an issue for it?
posted by mrbula on Oct 23, 2001 - 40 comments

Columnists Fired After Criticizing Bush

Columnists Fired After Criticizing Bush Two columnists for dailies in Texas and Oregon have been fired after writing pointed opinion pieces critical of President Bush's handling of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
posted by stevis on Oct 1, 2001 - 20 comments

The Washington Post calls it "An Attack on the World."

The Washington Post calls it "An Attack on the World." In addition, the London Times has a graphic of a world map that shows the number of people killed in last week's attacks from other countries.
posted by Taken Outtacontext on Sep 19, 2001 - 5 comments

The Tragedy in Cartoons.

The Tragedy in Cartoons. One of the more interesting effects of a national tragedy is that it always somehow causes the nation's editorial cartoonists to suffer massive, collective brain damage. Across the country, they rush to their easels and whip up cheesy, embarrassing caricatures of Uncle Sam crying. Or the Founding Fathers crying. Or - in this case - a comparison to Pearl Harbor. Or - if your local cartoonist is feeling particularly creative - the always crowd-pleasing weeping Statue of Liberty. As Cagle notes, "Fully half the nation's cartoonists drew the same cartoon on the same day." Including Cagle himself. A tragedy in cartoons indeed. Some psychiatrist really ought to study this phenomenon.
posted by aaron on Sep 14, 2001 - 20 comments

The Examiner spells it out.

The Examiner spells it out. As a newspaper page designer (for a much smaller, tamer paper), I wonder what you all think of the San Francisco Examiner's semi-profane but heartfelt front-page headline. On one hand, it's editorializing, but on the other, it expresses what an awful lot of people are thinking. I think I like it, but I also know it'd never get printed in a lot of papers, including my own.
posted by diddlegnome on Sep 13, 2001 - 23 comments

Special editions

Special editions Poynter.org has begun posting pdfs of newspaper front pages from around the country. Oddly, the San Fran Examiner's special edition front isn't up. Does anyone else have a link to it? How has your local paper handled it?
posted by ice_cream_motor on Sep 12, 2001 - 5 comments

WTC Editorial cartoons

WTC Editorial cartoons I don't know if they trivialize or symbolize, but they're often part of the artifacts we use to remember events like this.
posted by owillis on Sep 11, 2001 - 14 comments

The New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books site has been sensibly redesigned. You no longer have to page through essays, and there are now links to related articles from the magazine's archives.
posted by pracowity on Aug 4, 2001 - 7 comments

Cancel the Paper.

Cancel the Paper. Do you subscribe your local daily paper? (If it's not NY or DC or LA.) If so, do you actually read it? Did you ever subscribe? If so, why did you quit? What about the local alternative (weekly or otherwise)?
posted by jdbanks on Aug 1, 2001 - 37 comments

The Onion returns!

The Onion returns! Now, if only they'll print more Smoove B...
posted by solistrato on Jul 17, 2001 - 20 comments

Is the NY Times ranking its stories by "popularity" as they say, or as this writer suggests, what's "interesting"?
posted by lowblow on Jun 6, 2001 - 3 comments

Save the papers?

Save the papers? Nicholson Baker, in his new book Double Fold, tries to convince libraries and anyone else who will listen that we need to keep original newspapers to preserve the historical record. He's even started the nonprofit American Newspaper Repository so that libraries would sell their old papers to him.
posted by amyscoop on Apr 23, 2001 - 7 comments

I stole this link from Slate, which ran the news under the headline L A Times circulation drops
posted by u.n. owen on Mar 30, 2001 - 2 comments

Is this the future of web?

Is this the future of web? Is it me or are many Internet sites starting to mimmick newspapers? Large banner ads, aken to the full page spreads of newspapers and magazines. Oversized headlines. What next? Have major sites abandoned the internet as a separate medium?
posted by igloo on Mar 22, 2001 - 9 comments

Amazoning the news

Amazoning the news It seems weird at first, but maybe I would want to see the news this way... Anyone want to do it? (via nublog)
posted by owillis on Mar 20, 2001 - 5 comments

"Brown Students Steal Univ. Paper"

"Brown Students Steal Univ. Paper" File Under: When headlines get into this weird intentional?/unintentional? pun thing.
posted by Outlawyr on Mar 19, 2001 - 19 comments

The NYTimes looks back upon its 5 years of existence on the Web. There's even a small Flash movie detailing how the front page has changed over the years. When the heck did the Web start getting old?
posted by jkottke on Jan 21, 2001 - 28 comments

Nader Pro and Con (omnibus).

Nader Pro and Con (omnibus). The L.A. Weekly brings you about 20 prominent liberals' statements on whether they are voting Nader or Gore, and why ... captures pretty much all of the nuances in once place.
posted by MattD on Nov 2, 2000 - 0 comments

Bush receives more newspaper endorsements.

Bush receives more newspaper endorsements. Also, editors are predicting a Bush win. While I wince and grimace at the thought of that man in office, I also think the editors are deluded in thinking they have much influence over their readers' voting habits.
posted by Mo Nickels on Nov 2, 2000 - 7 comments

In the public interest or irresponsible journalism?

In the public interest or irresponsible journalism? One of our infamous tabloid newspapers published the names, locations and pictures of convicted paedophiles yesterday, the police have condemned what they did, the paper claims it is in the public interest and that the police don't do enough to protect us.....[more inside]
posted by Markb on Jul 24, 2000 - 7 comments

Journaux munis d'un blog

Journaux munis d'un blog The Guardian has a Weblog, as does The Age in Oz. Any other coelecanth media taking the plunge?
posted by joeclark on Jun 1, 2000 - 0 comments

Stupid new marketing word of the day: "Advertorial" (spotted on this NY Times page). Here's a screenshot - what exactly are they trying to say? Do their advertisements now contain editorial copy that should help shoppers make a more informed decision, or are they just trying to fool us into thinking these advertisements have more credibility because they are "editorialized"? (disclaimer: I hate marketing BS)
posted by mathowie on May 31, 2000 - 14 comments

Moonies buy UPI; Helen Thomas quits.

Moonies buy UPI; Helen Thomas quits. I've seen some, but not much, coverage of the fact that the Unification Church-owned Washington Times has purchased up the venerable United Press International. Although the UPI's been a cripped orginazation for years, I'm still disturbed to see it disappear into the maw of the crazier-than-you-think Times. Helen Thomas, the senior member of the White House press corps and all-around cool person, bailed immediately.
posted by snarkout on May 19, 2000 - 8 comments

The Corporatization of Weblogs Has Begun, it is decreed

The Corporatization of Weblogs Has Begun, it is decreed The current Editor & Publisher introduces blogging to its newspaper-editor audience and points out two blogs actually written by newspaper columnists. I do indeed agree that Weblogging is a viable new medium of expression for dead-tree media, and agree even more strongly that special-interest journalistic blogs are in desperate need. (I'm planning one myself, and wouldn't it be great to read dueling blogs on the same topic from rival newspapers?) I just worry that the column will have an illocutionary effect, i.e., it will cause something to happen just by uttering words, rather like "I now pronounce you married." In this case the words I worry about are "The corporatization of Weblogs has begun." I can hear Rushkoff griping about the good old days already. And I'd gripe along with him.
posted by joeclark on Mar 8, 2000 - 3 comments

HighWired.com

HighWired.com helps high schools put their newspapers (and classrooms and other information) online -- but i wonder if putting articles like this one, which tell personal information about students, online is a good idea. following that logic, i guess it's good that it's difficult to search high wired or find a list of all the high school newspapers that it hosts. if you poke around a bit, you can find many papers and it's good for a laugh.
posted by palegirl on Feb 2, 2000 - 0 comments

The San Francisco Examiner is up for sale?

The San Francisco Examiner is up for sale? I didn't even know this. I'm surprised no dotcoms have swooped in to buy the dead trees media. Apparently, they need a buyer very soon, or the paper will merge with the SF Chronicle. Will SF become yet another one-newspaper city? Sad...
posted by mathowie on Jan 29, 2000 - 1 comment

The People's Daily

The People's Daily - Like news, but not fact or truth? Then check out the China's government newspaper. Let's see what lies are coming 'American pig-dogs' today.
posted by tdecius on Sep 5, 1999 - 0 comments

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