341 posts tagged with newyorkcity.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 341. Subscribe:

Yo pipsqueaks!

What Makes a New York City Kid?
posted by strelitzia on Oct 22, 2016 - 12 comments

City of Women

What if the New York City subway map paid homage to some of the city’s great women? It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” is a song James Brown recorded in a New York City studio in 1966, and, whether you like it or not, you can make the case that he’s right. Walking down the city streets, young women get harassed in ways that tell them that this is not their world, their city, their street; that their freedom of movement and association is liable to be undermined at any time; and that a lot of strangers expect obedience and attention from them. “Smile,” a man orders you, and that’s a concise way to say that he owns you; he’s the boss; you do as you’re told; your face is there to serve his life, not express your own. He’s someone; you’re no one.
posted by strelitzia on Oct 13, 2016 - 4 comments

Tongues for the Memory

After 80 years, the original Carnegie Deli is closing this December. A bit more background information on the NYC landmark at Smithsonian.com.
posted by Iris Gambol on Oct 2, 2016 - 41 comments

Can we call it a "Jewish accent" rather than, say, a "New York accent"?

Why Linguists are Fascinated by the American Jewish Accent
Intonation, pitch, phrasing, cadence, conversational style and behavor patterns, use of non-English words and locally-specific references (and so much more) all combine to produce what we call the American Jewish Accent. [more inside]
posted by I_Love_Bananas on Sep 29, 2016 - 79 comments

"That business, more or less, stinks."

There are 24,000 restaurants in New York City. Gary Sernovitz invested in one, wrote about why he did, and came to the conclusion that investing in a Manhattan restaurant brings with it only "The Thrill of Losing Money". [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Sep 22, 2016 - 86 comments

LinkNYC changes tack

Over the past few months, LinkNYC has installed hundreds of its free high-speed wi-fi kiosks in Manhattan, and dozens more in Queens and the Bronx. In addition to wi-fi, the kiosks provide USB charging for phones, and—via a small built-in tablet—free phone calls, maps, and access to the web. They'd be supported via advertising on the big HD screens on each side and would cost taxpayers nothing. Or that was the idea, anyway... [more inside]
posted by Sokka shot first on Sep 15, 2016 - 105 comments

The Gradual Atlantis

When Will New York Sink? Even locals who believe climate change is real have a hard time grasping that their city will almost certainly be flooded beyond recognition: The deluge will begin slowly, and irregularly, and so it will confound human perceptions of change. Areas that never had flash floods will start to experience them, in part because global warming will also increase precipitation. High tides will spill over old bulkheads when there is a full moon. People will start carrying galoshes to work. All the commercial skyscrapers, housing, cultural institutions that currently sit near the waterline will be forced to contend with routine inundation. And cataclysmic floods will become more common, because, to put it simply, if the baseline water level is higher, every storm surge will be that much stronger. {...} Like a stumbling boxer, the city will try to keep its guard up, but the sea will only gain strength. [more inside]
posted by Doktor Zed on Sep 7, 2016 - 83 comments

Men In Hats

Charles W. Cushman's Kodachrome pictures of NYC in the 1940s
posted by The Whelk on Sep 1, 2016 - 30 comments

“You can tell by their finger movements,”

Subway Reads: Free E-Books, Timed for Your Commute [The New York Times] “On Sunday, Subway Reads started delivering novellas, short stories or excerpts from full-length books to passengers’ cellphones or tablets. The idea is for riders to download a short story or a chapter and read it on the train. Subway Reads will even let riders choose what to read based on how long they will be on the subway — a 10-page selection for a 10-minute ride, a 20-page selection for a 20-minute excursion, a 30-page selection for a 30-minute trip. Delays not included.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 31, 2016 - 6 comments

Subway Simulator 2016

Brand New Subway is a browser game that lets you build the New York City subway system, either starting from scratch or working from an existing model (including a few past and future plans). Predictably, this leads to all sorts of idiosyncratic designs which score poorly on the game's metrics for ridership and cost, but do much better on metrics such as Number of Figure 8s Through Hoboken. [more inside]
posted by Copronymus on Aug 3, 2016 - 57 comments

Underground, underwater

In Zarrilli's view, there is no time to waste. By 2030 or so, the water in New York Harbor could be a foot higher than it is today. That may not sound like much, but New York does not have to become Atlantis to be incapacitated. Even with a foot or two of sea-level rise, streets will become impassable at high tide, snarling traffic. The cost of flood insurance will skyrocket, causing home prices in risky neighborhoods to decline. (Who wants to buy a house that will soon be underwater?) - Can New York City Be Saved In The Era Of Global Warming? - Rolling Stone.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 11, 2016 - 34 comments

“I’m not going to mess with your milk. That is such a personal thing.”

$7 for Corn Flakes? Cereal Gets Makeover at Kellogg’s Store in Times Square [The New York Times] In a brave new world of breakfast food, replete with to-go bars and microwaveable sandwiches, companies like Kellogg’s and General Mills have seen their cereal sales decline over the past decade. Now, in hopes of helping its customers to rethink cereal, Kellogg’s plans to open a branded boutique in Times Square on Monday, charging Manhattan prices — as much as $7.50 — for bowls of Frosted Flakes and Raisin Bran. The cereal will be garnished with foodie flair — like lemon zest and green tea powder — to help justify those prices. “It’s all about honoring tradition but looking differently at a bowl of cereal,” said Anthony Rudolf, who will operate the store, called Kellogg’s NYC.
posted by Fizz on Jul 3, 2016 - 125 comments

"How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" "Ride your bike there!"

NYC Streets Metamorphosis looks back at the transformation of Times Square, Herald Square, the Brooklyn waterfront and other locations around NYC that are shifting away from their automobile-centric past. From Streetfilms, a part of the Streetsblog network.
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 22, 2016 - 2 comments

“Let me tell you about this business. Every truck has a bat inside.”

“You will never see a Mister Softee truck in Midtown,” he continued. “If you do, there will be problems, and you won’t see him there very long.” [SLNYT]
posted by Chrysostom on May 31, 2016 - 54 comments

Current Location: Unknown

Misplaced.Design Eleven New York City landmarks have been misplaced, their current location unknown. Photographs of unclear origin appear to show them scattered across the globe – on sand dunes, mud flats, “lunar” plains, and rocky beaches. Nobody knows exactly what happened or why
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Apr 28, 2016 - 9 comments

Living just enough, just enough for the city

1993, Manhattan – someone films test footage for an early HD video format called D-VHS.
SLYT, make sure to switch to 1080p60 for best quality
posted by timshel on Apr 25, 2016 - 35 comments

the far away shore

Vilray Bolles and Damon Hankoff perform On A Slow Boat to China in the NYC Subway
posted by Potomac Avenue on Apr 8, 2016 - 3 comments

Cafe Grumpy and more: NYC coffee shops

28 Outstanding Coffee Shops in New York City - Levi Dalton and Marguerite Preston, The Eater, 2015 (with map)
The 10 best coffee shops in New York City - Liz Clayton, The Thrillist, 2015
10 Hottest Coffee Shops in NYC - Megan O. Steintrager, Zagat, 2015
The best coffee shops in New York - Time Out, 2014
101 Places to Find Great Coffee in New York - interactive map
And of course, there's an app for that.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 30, 2016 - 23 comments

The cupcake is malevolent.

"Being a fascist collaborator has never tasted so sweet.": Performance artist Penny Arcade on cupcakes and New York City at the Poetry Project's 2016 New Year's Day marathon benefit reading.
posted by frumiousb on Jan 2, 2016 - 10 comments

"The secret of happiness is here"

Off-Broadway's "Daddy Long Legs" musical (based on the novel that inspired the 1955 movie) is livestreaming tonight's 8 pm ET New York performance right now. [more inside]
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Dec 10, 2015 - 20 comments

Did you say the Hippodrome?

The Delights and Perils of Navigating New York City with a Guidebook from 1899, in which Luke Spencer at Atlas Obscura spends a weekend with the 1899 Baedeker guide to NYC.
posted by Stacey on Nov 19, 2015 - 17 comments

There's a font for every broken heart on Broadway

13 miles of typography on Broadway from A to Zabar's, New York City's showiest street shows off its signage (and yes, it includes an example of Broadway font)
posted by oneswellfoop on Nov 17, 2015 - 6 comments

March of the balloon animals

1929-1964, Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade (SL Mashable)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 9, 2015 - 23 comments

Balancing Safety with Sieverts

"In New York City, the police now maintain an unknown number of military-grade vans outfitted with X-ray radiation, enabling cops to look through the walls of buildings or the sides of trucks ... The NYPD will not reveal when, where, or how often they are used."
posted by tocts on Oct 21, 2015 - 46 comments

An $18 grilled cheese sandwich?

"The way to kill a complex city is to chase out all the poor people – and their food" "When greed makes a place like New York, London or San Francisco unaffordable, the non-wealthy leave, and the city loses the smells and tastes that made it great." [SLGuardian]
posted by gucci mane on Oct 1, 2015 - 57 comments

The Hart Island Project: history is created through storytelling

Hart Island is a 131 acre island found at the western end of Long Island Sound. From the air, you can see paths, clearings, buildings and docks, but you can't clearly see the Riker's Island inmates who bury the forgotten dead in mass graves. Since 1869, there have been close to a million bodies buried on the 101 acre potter's field, but only recently was the site re-opened to the public. Still, access is limited, and finding a grave site is difficult. That's where the Hart Island Project comes in, by helping to map graves, identify the dead, and allow people to share their memories of loved ones. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 1, 2015 - 4 comments

Stromae Takes America

Since the release of his North American debut album “Racine Carrée,” international superstar Stromae has gone on to sell more than 3.5 million albums, performed for thousands of fans in stadiums across the globe, and for the first time in pop history, will be the first ever French spoken artist to have headlined the prestigious Madison Square Garden in New York City this fall. Here, he travels around NYC to sing "Papaoutai" and meet all his American fans. [more inside]
posted by saul wright on Sep 4, 2015 - 18 comments

surviving in a hungry sea of white noise

Brooklyn's Afropunk festival has gone from a small gathering of friends celebrating an underground documentary to a massive, celebrated boutique fashion and mainstream music cornucopia. Some say they have sold out. But in Pitchfork, author Hanif Abdurraqib, (previously) makes a case that it still represents something very real and important to black youth culture.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 21, 2015 - 9 comments

A Wiseguy Ossuary

Although most New Yorkers haven't been there, the Hole hides in plain sight. Many pass it on the way to John F Kennedy International Airport, on a bleak road above which jets wheeze in on their final descent toward the runways along Jamaica Bay. Behind a tatty curtain of trees and weeds, there is a strange depression in the land, as if a sinkhole had opened here on the desultory border between Brooklyn and Queens. It looks less like a New York neighbourhood than an Arkansas village, only with housing projects on the horizon instead of the Ozark Mountains. Welcome to the Hole.
posted by Ghostride The Whip on Aug 14, 2015 - 25 comments

"You can go wild on the wall, everything that comes to your imagination"

"The thing I find very exciting is waiting for the subway train and sometimes you'll get a glorious one that arrives decorated like a birthday cake!" Watching My Name Go By is a short 1976 BBC documentary about graffiti, artists, and graffiti artists in New York City. The film is based on Norman Mailer's 1974 essay for Esquire magazine, "The Faith of Grafitti." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 16, 2015 - 5 comments

My Blue Polyester Prison

The NYPD uniform is as iconic as it is polarizing. Wearing it makes me a target for both praise and censure—neither of which I, in most cases, did anything to deserve. My character becomes a many-sided die, the cast contingent on the preconceptions and experiences of whoever is looking. With each person I encounter I wonder how it’s going to be: Am I an oaf? A hero? A pawn? A tyrant?
An anonymous female NYPD officer reflects on what it's like to wear the blue.
posted by Cash4Lead on Jul 8, 2015 - 23 comments

“Today we have been told — yet again — our lives have no value.”

Cleveland Police Officer Acquitted of Manslaughter in 2012 Deaths [New York Times]
A police officer who climbed onto the hood of a car after a chase in 2012 and fired repeatedly at its unarmed occupants, both of them black, was acquitted of manslaughter on Saturday by an Ohio judge. The trial of the white officer, Michael Brelo, following harrowing episodes in communities such as Baltimore, Staten Island and Ferguson, Mo., played out amid broader questions of how the police interact with African-Americans and use force, in Cleveland and across the country.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on May 24, 2015 - 52 comments

Confessions of a location scout.

"That’s when I realised we were looking for something that only exists in the movies." (slTheGrauniad)
posted by Kitteh on May 12, 2015 - 51 comments

The Sandhogs

Eighty years ago, New York City needed another tunnel under the Hudson River. The Holland Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge could no longer handle the mounting traffic between New Jersey and Manhattan. Thus began construction of the Lincoln Tunnel. But this is not a story about the Lincoln Tunnel. This is about the men who made it. The Sandhogs.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Apr 18, 2015 - 10 comments

“For me, to live in Pakistan is to know extremes of hope and despair.”

Globalization is a brutal phenomenon. It brings us mass displacement, wars, terrorism, unchecked financial capitalism, inequality, xenophobia, climate change. But if globalization is capable of holding out any fundamental promise to us, any temptation to go along with its havoc, then surely that promise ought to be this: we will be more free to invent ourselves. In that country, this city, in Lahore, in New York, in London, that factory, this office, in those clothes, that occupation, in wherever it is we long for, we will be liberated to be what we choose to be.
- Discontent and Its Civilizations (excerpt), by Mohsin Hamid (previously); reviewed [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 19, 2015 - 31 comments

"Every civilized nation has one or more characteristic drinks"

Odd Drinks To Be Had.
Here, from the December 26, 1893, issue of the New York Sun, is an article about the various drinking establishments of Lower Manhattan, from the Battery up to about 28th Street. Be aware, some of the ethnic attitudes expressed in this piece are very much of their time. You’ll also note peculiarities of style and spelling; those are all in the original.
posted by Lexica on Mar 3, 2015 - 21 comments

The Carver Mobb: New York City Street Football

Essentially two-hand-touch taken to bloodsport level, with two 25-minute halves, a mostly running clock, and referees to nominally control the mayhem, it's the closest these weekend warriors will come to professional sport, though many are high-caliber athletes.
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 24, 2015 - 7 comments

New York: A Documentary Film

The much esteemed eight-part history of New York City "New York: A Documentary Film" is available. (approximate length 17 hrs. 30 min.) [more inside]
posted by cwest on Jan 16, 2015 - 16 comments

gotham from above

Imagine leaning out of an open door of a helicopter 7,500 feet over New York City on a very dark and chilly night... (making of)
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jan 12, 2015 - 4 comments


The Partisan Review, a critical magazine founded by William Phillips and Philip Rahv (and Kenneth Fearing) and originally created as an arm of the American Communist Party was 'more a literary event than a literary magazine,' that lost its purpose after perestroika: The Death of a Literary Magazine. But even in death, the archives are not 'down the memory hole', but rather digitized and available online. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 30, 2014 - 3 comments

Lose yourself

Dérive is a smartphone app inspired by the Situationists that encourages you to wander your city. You can use the general deck, use one for Abu Dhabi, Biella, Ithaca, Johannesburg, Kampala, New York City, Paris or San Francisco, or make your own
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 19, 2014 - 16 comments

I used to pedal my bike up Snake Road and trap muskrats in the salt pond

Following Hook Creek past ghost towns and discarded highways to the lost waterways of New York City. - By Nathan Kensinger
posted by Potomac Avenue on Dec 5, 2014 - 2 comments

Kosciuszko, Van Wyck, and Spuyten Duyvil

How to Pronounce New York (and Northern New Jersey)
posted by Navelgazer on Dec 2, 2014 - 85 comments

If everyone sees your dickpic hanging in a gallery except you is it art?

In light of Dries Verhoeven's public art of his Grindr interactions (since cancelled), Arne Svenson's show, "The Neighbors" (previously) and Future Femme's piece, Show Me More: A collection of DickPix, and amid questions of legality and ethics, the Guardian examines art, consent and privacy.
posted by frimble on Oct 30, 2014 - 11 comments

Taxis, Rainbows and Stars

Earlier this year, Chris Whong made a FOIL request to the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission, receiving fare and trip data for all licensed cabs in New York in 2013. (previously) The data was anonymised, but as Vijay Pandurangan realised, only partially. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Oct 16, 2014 - 13 comments

Gentrification, Inc.

How one developer is attracting the 'right kind of people' to new locales with, among others things, dance parties.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 24, 2014 - 107 comments

“There are eight million stories in the naked city.”

No, the above quote is not the answer to “How many total episodes are there of the various “Law & Order” franchises?”. In actuality, those nine words conclude one of the most exciting films of the 1940’s (and the direct ancestor of Dick Wolf’s prolific franchise). Welcome to “The Naked City”. [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Sep 14, 2014 - 12 comments

Windows on the World That Was

In June 2001, Estonian immigrant Konstantin Petrov got a job as an electrician for Windows on the World, the famous restaurant in the World Trade Center. The New Yorker has an article about the recent discovery of a trove of photographs he took during lulls in his shifts, an incredible record of the complex before the events of thirteen years ago. [more inside]
posted by theartandsound on Sep 10, 2014 - 16 comments

When I found out they were black, my world just stopped.

“These are young people who refuse to be put in a box, but are still trying to make sense of themselves. Over the years, the concept of Black rock has been rejected by both Blacks and whites. Afropunk shows that there are other types of Black experiences. It’s exciting to see Blacks who are unafraid to go a different way.” Afropunk Before Afropunk [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Sep 4, 2014 - 8 comments

”Hi Jenny! I’m the doctor who did your abortion on Saturday.”

Jenny Kutner wrote an article about her upcoming abortion; after her abortion, her doctor wrote her back.
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Sep 2, 2014 - 46 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7