174 posts tagged with newyorkcity and nyc.
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Did you say the Hippodrome?

The Delights and Perils of Navigating New York City with a Guidebook from 1899, in which Luke Spencer at Atlas Obscura spends a weekend with the 1899 Baedeker guide to NYC.
posted by Stacey on Nov 19, 2015 - 17 comments

Balancing Safety with Sieverts

"In New York City, the police now maintain an unknown number of military-grade vans outfitted with X-ray radiation, enabling cops to look through the walls of buildings or the sides of trucks ... The NYPD will not reveal when, where, or how often they are used."
posted by tocts on Oct 21, 2015 - 46 comments

The Hart Island Project: history is created through storytelling

Hart Island is a 131 acre island found at the western end of Long Island Sound. From the air, you can see paths, clearings, buildings and docks, but you can't clearly see the Riker's Island inmates who bury the forgotten dead in mass graves. Since 1869, there have been close to a million bodies buried on the 101 acre potter's field, but only recently was the site re-opened to the public. Still, access is limited, and finding a grave site is difficult. That's where the Hart Island Project comes in, by helping to map graves, identify the dead, and allow people to share their memories of loved ones. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 1, 2015 - 4 comments

Stromae Takes America

Since the release of his North American debut album “Racine Carrée,” international superstar Stromae has gone on to sell more than 3.5 million albums, performed for thousands of fans in stadiums across the globe, and for the first time in pop history, will be the first ever French spoken artist to have headlined the prestigious Madison Square Garden in New York City this fall. Here, he travels around NYC to sing "Papaoutai" and meet all his American fans. [more inside]
posted by saul wright on Sep 4, 2015 - 18 comments

A Wiseguy Ossuary

Although most New Yorkers haven't been there, the Hole hides in plain sight. Many pass it on the way to John F Kennedy International Airport, on a bleak road above which jets wheeze in on their final descent toward the runways along Jamaica Bay. Behind a tatty curtain of trees and weeds, there is a strange depression in the land, as if a sinkhole had opened here on the desultory border between Brooklyn and Queens. It looks less like a New York neighbourhood than an Arkansas village, only with housing projects on the horizon instead of the Ozark Mountains. Welcome to the Hole.
posted by Ghostride The Whip on Aug 14, 2015 - 25 comments

"You can go wild on the wall, everything that comes to your imagination"

"The thing I find very exciting is waiting for the subway train and sometimes you'll get a glorious one that arrives decorated like a birthday cake!" Watching My Name Go By is a short 1976 BBC documentary about graffiti, artists, and graffiti artists in New York City. The film is based on Norman Mailer's 1974 essay for Esquire magazine, "The Faith of Grafitti." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 16, 2015 - 5 comments

"Every civilized nation has one or more characteristic drinks"

Odd Drinks To Be Had.
Here, from the December 26, 1893, issue of the New York Sun, is an article about the various drinking establishments of Lower Manhattan, from the Battery up to about 28th Street. Be aware, some of the ethnic attitudes expressed in this piece are very much of their time. You’ll also note peculiarities of style and spelling; those are all in the original.
posted by Lexica on Mar 3, 2015 - 21 comments

The Carver Mobb: New York City Street Football

Essentially two-hand-touch taken to bloodsport level, with two 25-minute halves, a mostly running clock, and referees to nominally control the mayhem, it's the closest these weekend warriors will come to professional sport, though many are high-caliber athletes.
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 24, 2015 - 7 comments

New York: A Documentary Film

The much esteemed eight-part history of New York City "New York: A Documentary Film" is available. (approximate length 17 hrs. 30 min.) [more inside]
posted by cwest on Jan 16, 2015 - 16 comments

gotham from above

Imagine leaning out of an open door of a helicopter 7,500 feet over New York City on a very dark and chilly night... (making of)
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jan 12, 2015 - 4 comments

Taxis, Rainbows and Stars

Earlier this year, Chris Whong made a FOIL request to the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission, receiving fare and trip data for all licensed cabs in New York in 2013. (previously) The data was anonymised, but as Vijay Pandurangan realised, only partially. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Oct 16, 2014 - 13 comments

Gentrification, Inc.

How one developer is attracting the 'right kind of people' to new locales with, among others things, dance parties.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 24, 2014 - 107 comments

When I found out they were black, my world just stopped.

“These are young people who refuse to be put in a box, but are still trying to make sense of themselves. Over the years, the concept of Black rock has been rejected by both Blacks and whites. Afropunk shows that there are other types of Black experiences. It’s exciting to see Blacks who are unafraid to go a different way.” Afropunk Before Afropunk [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Sep 4, 2014 - 8 comments

”Hi Jenny! I’m the doctor who did your abortion on Saturday.”

Jenny Kutner wrote an article about her upcoming abortion; after her abortion, her doctor wrote her back.
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Sep 2, 2014 - 46 comments

Apartment Houses of the Metropolis

10 Elaborate Floor Plans from Pre-World War I New York City Apartments
posted by nadawi on Aug 18, 2014 - 35 comments

NYC's push to change elite high school admissions

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for changing the admissions criteria of NYC's elite high schools, arguing that relying solely on a single exam (the SHSAT) "creates a “rich-get-richer” dynamic that benefits the wealthy, who can afford expensive test prep. However, the reality is just the opposite. It’s not affluent whites, but rather the city’s burgeoning population of Asian-American immigrants — a group that, despite its successes, remains disproportionately poor and working-class — whose children have aced the exam in overwhelming numbers." [more inside]
posted by gemutlichkeit on Jul 20, 2014 - 73 comments

Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

The 1812 Overture and fireworks, as American as ... waitaminute

Every Fourth of July, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is heard all over the United States, timed to the burst of fireworks. How did this Russian composition, celebrating the Russian victory over the French in that War of 1812 (not the war between England and the US), become a staple of the United States' Independence Day celebrations? We can thank the Boston Pops. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 3, 2014 - 29 comments

the life and daily struggle of a 72-year-old can collector

surviving in new york city, 5 cents at a time
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 5, 2014 - 29 comments

15 potential headquarters for the Illuminati: theories and conspiracies

The Complex City Guide has a bit of information on 15 possible headquarters for the Illuminati, but it's a slideshow with limited information, and there's a lot of information out there, so let's get into it. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2014 - 74 comments

Why Libraries Matter

A day in the life of New York City's public libraries: Traveling from borough to borough, this short documentary by Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks reveals just how important the modern library is for millions of people. Why Libraries Matter.
posted by cashman on May 17, 2014 - 6 comments

word has it, he got a deal for only $2350/month

An army of NYPD cops on Thursday evicted a homeless man from his Manhattan Bridge "home" — which was complete with a gas heater, hot sauce and beer.
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Apr 17, 2014 - 59 comments

Hidden treasures, in drying lakes and rivers, and in NYC street cracks

The drought in California has brought about a number of things, from exposing part of Mormon Island, an old mining town that has partially emerged from Folsom Lake (news coverage clip; aerial view of a re-emerged bridge with overly dramatic music; a tour of the exposed ruins), to being good news for gold prospectors. But if there's too much of a crowd in the Sierra Nevada foothills, you can always dig for gold in New York City (alt: YouTube), in the cracks of Midtown's Diamond District with Raffi Stepanian.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2014 - 6 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

Boy About Town

What 11-Year-Old Kareem Granton Saw During 5 Days Roaming New York City (Warning: Slideshow format, but with original artwork.) [more inside]
posted by Pfardentrott on Mar 24, 2014 - 32 comments

Grand by Design

Grand by Design is a Centennial Celebration of Grand Central Terminal. It's a looong page with a lot of nice images and facts from the history of the Grand Central Depot/ Station/ Terminal. (Previously)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 17, 2014 - 6 comments

American Cities: Before and After

Smithsonian Magazine's interactive map series on American cities. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 31, 2014 - 4 comments

NYC events this weekend inc.: Lunar New Year, concerts, football game.

NFL holds Super Bowl in NYC; NYC unimpressed. While the stadium is technically in New Jersey, it is considered equally if not primarily a New York stadium, and the NFL turned Times Square and Broadway into Super Bowl Boulevard Engineered By GMC. Visitors can kick a football, watch television, ride a toboggan, shop, enjoy a free slice of Papa John's pizza, play XBox, take a photo with the oversized Roman numerals 'XLVIII', use relevant Twitter hashtags, and more. It is not decadent and depraved, though Vice and Gothamist would tend to disagree. The Times discusses less vehement disapproval and disappointment, while Business Insider wishes ill upon the city. Ticket sales are faltering relative to recent years, with the new mayor among those skipping out.
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth on Jan 31, 2014 - 104 comments

The New York Filming Locations of The Godfather, Then and Now

Because the film is a period piece, The Godfather actually presents a fascinating record of what 1940s-era New York City locations still existed in the early-1970s. Sadly, many of them are now gone. What still remains? Let’s take a closer look.
posted by timshel on Jan 27, 2014 - 27 comments

Oh cool, a cop on horseback

Here's a tour of the East Village in 1993, courtesy of local Iggy Pop. via
posted by timshel on Jan 20, 2014 - 6 comments

Certainly is nice to see yah

Don Rickles gives a tour of Brooklyn in 1968 (via)
posted by timshel on Jan 5, 2014 - 10 comments

Like the Champs-Élysées!

Ernest Flagg (1857-1947) was an architect in the United States, who worked mostly in New York, and in 1904 had a radical plan to remake Central Park.
New York's Central Park That Never Was [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 4, 2014 - 16 comments

Ooh, pick me up.

The New York City Taxi Drivers 2014 Calendar (via New York Magazine) [more inside]
posted by facehugger on Dec 10, 2013 - 3 comments

A Sonic Time Machine

The Roaring Twenties: An Interactive Exploration of the Historical Soundscape of New York City (sound autoplays). via i09, which says The map uses a combination of noise complaints and old reel footage to plot everything from what must have been an exceptionally noisy subway turnstile (complete with notes from the police report) all the way to a carnival barkers in Coney Island, and is a great way to listen in on the everyday life of a New York City gone-by.
posted by davidjmcgee on Dec 9, 2013 - 3 comments

It didn’t used to be like this.

Why I Am Leaving New York City
posted by griphus on Nov 26, 2013 - 118 comments

'I like to think of Hart Island as New York City’s family tomb'

There are a few ways to end up on Hart Island. One third of its inhabitants are infants—some parents couldn’t afford a burial, others didn’t realize what a “city burial” meant when they checked it on the form. Many of the dead here were homeless, while others were simply unclaimed; if your body remains at the city morgue for more than two weeks, you, too, will be sent for burial by a team of prisoners on Hart Island.
posted by anastasiav on Nov 8, 2013 - 30 comments

They say they thought there were fewer homeless people than before.

If you declare, in a famous poem affixed to the Statue of Liberty, in New York Harbor, “Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me,” you might consider that a certain commitment has been made. (SLNYer)
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Oct 22, 2013 - 31 comments

5th Avenue Blue

NY 41×41 is a very cool Infinite Zoom Illusion Video of Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue created by Paul Trillo. [via] [more inside]
posted by quin on Oct 11, 2013 - 8 comments

We want to have Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Can you make us a reservation?

Entirely true stories from two hotel concierges in Times Square. (SLTumblr)
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 8, 2013 - 319 comments

INTERNET 1897: A Series of Pneumatic Tubes, Some of Which Contain Cats

Between 1897 and 1953, the New York City post office used a system of pneumatic tubes to move up to 30% of its mail around the city. Among the first things sent whizzing across Manhattan during the inauguration of the system: a black cat. Via the links in that Atlantic article, you can find other strange aspects to the story. For example, there was a pneumatic subway in use in NYC by 1870 — The Beach Pneumatic Transit covered an entire block for three years!
posted by not_on_display on Oct 8, 2013 - 28 comments

I ♥ I ♥ NY

By now, the story is well known. A man sits in the backseat of a cab, sketching on a notepad as night falls over a crumbling city. He scribbles the letter I. He draws a heart. And then an N, and then a Y. Right away he knows he’s got something. This is it, he thinks. This is the campaign. The man was a designer named Milton Glaser. The city was New York. The year was 1977. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 5, 2013 - 25 comments

Energy crisis, industrial pollution, Kodachromes and more...

From The Atlantic, a series of photography that documents America in the 1970s: the Pacific Northwest | New York City | the Southwest | Chicago's African-American community | Texas [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 29, 2013 - 20 comments

Lincoln Highway, the first (attempt at a) transcontinental US highway

On July 1, 1913, a group of automobile enthusiasts and industry officials established the Lincoln Highway Association "to procure the establishment of a continuous improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to lawful traffic of all description without toll charges," and to be a lasting memorial to Abraham Lincoln. The Lincoln Highway efforts started about three years before the first federal road act would provide funding to states to improve the broad network of roads. Never officially finished, the first transcontinental highway eventually became renumbered as various interstate and US routes. To celebrate its centennial, there was a cross-country tour in June. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 17, 2013 - 33 comments

"Hint: It's not about the kids."

In 2002, now-disgraced stock analyst Jack Grubman (previously) was the central figure in a preschool-placement scandal in New York's famously Wall Street connected 92nd Street Y.
The Price Of Perfection
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 16, 2013 - 34 comments

Liquid City

"For 400 years, New York has embraced, spurned, ignored, harnessed, and feared the water that made its greatness possible. Now our relationship must get even more complex." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 8, 2013 - 19 comments

America's 10 Worst Prisons

"'If you can't do the time, don't do the crime.' So goes the old saying. Yet conditions in some American facilities are so obscene that they amount to a form of extrajudicial punishment." Mother Jones is profiling "America's 10 Worst Prisons." Facilities were chosen for the list based on "...three years of research, correspondence with prisoners, and interviews with reform advocates." [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 14, 2013 - 88 comments

In a City of Hipstercrites

How I Became a Hipster (SLNYT)
posted by shivohum on May 2, 2013 - 155 comments

Meet me at Hoyt & Schermerhorn at 3 on the dot

Street signs at NYC intersections featuring rap lyrics about them.
posted by dry white toast on Mar 25, 2013 - 27 comments

Pork sticky rolls are a REAL THING.

Here's the recipe for chef Hadley Schmitt's famous Pork Sticky Rolls with Dijon-Maple Glaze and Parsnip Icing served at Northern Spy Food Company, East Village, NYC.
posted by ericb on Mar 8, 2013 - 17 comments

NYC Past

NYC Past Large-format historical photos of New York City.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken on Mar 5, 2013 - 13 comments

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