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Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

The 1812 Overture and fireworks, as American as ... waitaminute

Every Fourth of July, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is heard all over the United States, timed to the burst of fireworks. How did this Russian composition, celebrating the Russian victory over the French in that War of 1812 (not the war between England and the US), become a staple of the United States' Independence Day celebrations? We can thank the Boston Pops. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 3, 2014 - 28 comments

Why am I screaming for Ice Cream again?

NYT Dining & Wine's Ice Cream Issue:
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jul 2, 2014 - 57 comments

the life and daily struggle of a 72-year-old can collector

surviving in new york city, 5 cents at a time
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 5, 2014 - 29 comments

15 potential headquarters for the Illuminati: theories and conspiracies

The Complex City Guide has a bit of information on 15 possible headquarters for the Illuminati, but it's a slideshow with limited information, and there's a lot of information out there, so let's get into it. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2014 - 74 comments

Why Libraries Matter

A day in the life of New York City's public libraries: Traveling from borough to borough, this short documentary by Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks reveals just how important the modern library is for millions of people. Why Libraries Matter.
posted by cashman on May 17, 2014 - 6 comments

word has it, he got a deal for only $2350/month

An army of NYPD cops on Thursday evicted a homeless man from his Manhattan Bridge "home" — which was complete with a gas heater, hot sauce and beer.
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Apr 17, 2014 - 59 comments

Home. Sweet. Home.

"Squatters took up the fight where the homesteaders had shown the way, occupying abandoned buildings with a more DIY approach. Whereas homesteaders, beholden to the rules of the government programs that sponsored them, hadn’t been permitted to occupy a building until the work was complete, squatters moved in and lived in the raw spaces from the beginning, putting in the time and effort to transform the buildings without the financial support or sanction of the government. They scavenged materials where they could, and employed skill-sharing, learning building skills from those with experience and then passing that knowledge along. By 1989, there were an estimated two-dozen squatted buildings in the Lower East Side."

posted by frimble on Apr 8, 2014 - 10 comments

Hidden treasures, in drying lakes and rivers, and in NYC street cracks

The drought in California has brought about a number of things, from exposing part of Mormon Island, an old mining town that has partially emerged from Folsom Lake (news coverage clip; aerial view of a re-emerged bridge with overly dramatic music; a tour of the exposed ruins), to being good news for gold prospectors. But if there's too much of a crowd in the Sierra Nevada foothills, you can always dig for gold in New York City (alt: YouTube), in the cracks of Midtown's Diamond District with Raffi Stepanian.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2014 - 6 comments

Note: pineapple is an abomination against the Pizza Gods

A Complete Guide to New York City Pizza Styles
Although New York City has long had a clearly defined and ubiquitous style of pizza, the city's appetite for the dish knows no bounds. While New Yorkers can certainly be parochial and protective of their home slice, they can also be open and accepting of different pizza points of view. Here is a look at the predominant forms of pizza found in New York City with information about how they developed over the years, and a glimpse at some of the more eclectic and disparate variations on the theme.

posted by Lexica on Mar 31, 2014 - 127 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

Boy About Town

What 11-Year-Old Kareem Granton Saw During 5 Days Roaming New York City (Warning: Slideshow format, but with original artwork.) [more inside]
posted by Pfardentrott on Mar 24, 2014 - 32 comments

Wall Street Debutants' Big Party

I Crashed a Wall Street Secret Society Initiation
posted by Renoroc on Feb 18, 2014 - 119 comments

Grand by Design

Grand by Design is a Centennial Celebration of Grand Central Terminal. It's a looong page with a lot of nice images and facts from the history of the Grand Central Depot/ Station/ Terminal. (Previously)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 17, 2014 - 6 comments

American Cities: Before and After

Smithsonian Magazine's interactive map series on American cities. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 31, 2014 - 4 comments

NYC events this weekend inc.: Lunar New Year, concerts, football game.

NFL holds Super Bowl in NYC; NYC unimpressed. While the stadium is technically in New Jersey, it is considered equally if not primarily a New York stadium, and the NFL turned Times Square and Broadway into Super Bowl Boulevard Engineered By GMC. Visitors can kick a football, watch television, ride a toboggan, shop, enjoy a free slice of Papa John's pizza, play XBox, take a photo with the oversized Roman numerals 'XLVIII', use relevant Twitter hashtags, and more. It is not decadent and depraved, though Vice and Gothamist would tend to disagree. The Times discusses less vehement disapproval and disappointment, while Business Insider wishes ill upon the city. Ticket sales are faltering relative to recent years, with the new mayor among those skipping out.
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth on Jan 31, 2014 - 104 comments

The New York Filming Locations of The Godfather, Then and Now

Because the film is a period piece, The Godfather actually presents a fascinating record of what 1940s-era New York City locations still existed in the early-1970s. Sadly, many of them are now gone. What still remains? Let’s take a closer look.
posted by timshel on Jan 27, 2014 - 27 comments

Oh cool, a cop on horseback

Here's a tour of the East Village in 1993, courtesy of local Iggy Pop. via
posted by timshel on Jan 20, 2014 - 6 comments

Certainly is nice to see yah

Don Rickles gives a tour of Brooklyn in 1968 (via)
posted by timshel on Jan 5, 2014 - 10 comments

Like the Champs-Élysées!

Ernest Flagg (1857-1947) was an architect in the United States, who worked mostly in New York, and in 1904 had a radical plan to remake Central Park.
New York's Central Park That Never Was [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 4, 2014 - 16 comments

I was mugged and shot, but I also wasn't.

"Am I safe? Is what I have, my memory of the event and your scribbled notes, enough to get this guy? Should I tweet about this?" C. D. Hermelin is mugged in broad daylight in Manhattan’s Financial District.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Dec 12, 2013 - 85 comments

Ooh, pick me up.

The New York City Taxi Drivers 2014 Calendar (via New York Magazine) [more inside]
posted by facehugger on Dec 10, 2013 - 3 comments

“People don’t go nowhere in Brooklyn”

The number of homeless New Yorkers in shelters has risen by more than 69 percent since 2002, when Mayor Bloomberg took office. Each night as many as 60,000 people -- including more than 22,000 children, the highest number since the Great Depression, -- experience homelessness in NYC, and during the course of each year, more than 111,000 different homeless New Yorkers, including more than 40,000 children, will sleep in the city's municipal shelter system. Meet Dasani, one of the city's 'invisible children.' [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 9, 2013 - 112 comments

A Sonic Time Machine

The Roaring Twenties: An Interactive Exploration of the Historical Soundscape of New York City (sound autoplays). via i09, which says The map uses a combination of noise complaints and old reel footage to plot everything from what must have been an exceptionally noisy subway turnstile (complete with notes from the police report) all the way to a carnival barkers in Coney Island, and is a great way to listen in on the everyday life of a New York City gone-by.
posted by davidjmcgee on Dec 9, 2013 - 3 comments

I'm Beginning To Eat The Slice

Do you like Pizza? Do you like The Velvet Underground? Then you might like Mccaulay Culkin's new pizza-themed Velvet Underground tribute band.
posted by Fuzzy Monster on Dec 7, 2013 - 51 comments

"It's the lousy drink," he said, summing things up.

On September 20, 1956, just before the bars closed at 3 a.m., a single-engine plane landed on St. Nicholas Avenue near 191st Street in northern Manhattan. Behind the stick was 26-year-old Tommy Fiztpatrick, who pulled off the no-lights, no-radio "feat of aeronautics" while (allegedly) drunk to (allegedly) win a bar bet. Two years later, when a fellow patron called his story into question, Fitzpatrick did it again.
posted by gottabefunky on Dec 4, 2013 - 43 comments

It didn’t used to be like this.

Why I Am Leaving New York City
posted by griphus on Nov 26, 2013 - 118 comments

'I like to think of Hart Island as New York City’s family tomb'

There are a few ways to end up on Hart Island. One third of its inhabitants are infants—some parents couldn’t afford a burial, others didn’t realize what a “city burial” meant when they checked it on the form. Many of the dead here were homeless, while others were simply unclaimed; if your body remains at the city morgue for more than two weeks, you, too, will be sent for burial by a team of prisoners on Hart Island.
posted by anastasiav on Nov 8, 2013 - 30 comments

But down in the underground, you'll find a series of tubes...

Deep below the streets of New York City lie its vital organs—a water system, subways, railroads, tunnels, sewers, drains, and power and cable lines—in a vast, three-dimensional tangle. Penetrating this centuries-old underworld of caverns, squatters, and unmarked doors, William Langewiesche follows three men who constantly navigate its dangers: the subway-operations chief who dealt with the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, the engineer in charge of three underground mega-projects, and the guy who, well, just loves exploring the dark, jerry-rigged heart of a great metropolis. What Lies Beneath.
posted by Ghostride The Whip on Oct 26, 2013 - 21 comments

They say they thought there were fewer homeless people than before.

If you declare, in a famous poem affixed to the Statue of Liberty, in New York Harbor, “Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me,” you might consider that a certain commitment has been made. (SLNYer)
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Oct 22, 2013 - 31 comments

5th Avenue Blue

NY 41×41 is a very cool Infinite Zoom Illusion Video of Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue created by Paul Trillo. [via] [more inside]
posted by quin on Oct 11, 2013 - 8 comments

We want to have Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Can you make us a reservation?

Entirely true stories from two hotel concierges in Times Square. (SLTumblr)
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 8, 2013 - 319 comments

INTERNET 1897: A Series of Pneumatic Tubes, Some of Which Contain Cats

Between 1897 and 1953, the New York City post office used a system of pneumatic tubes to move up to 30% of its mail around the city. Among the first things sent whizzing across Manhattan during the inauguration of the system: a black cat. Via the links in that Atlantic article, you can find other strange aspects to the story. For example, there was a pneumatic subway in use in NYC by 1870 — The Beach Pneumatic Transit covered an entire block for three years!
posted by not_on_display on Oct 8, 2013 - 28 comments

I ♥ I ♥ NY

By now, the story is well known. A man sits in the backseat of a cab, sketching on a notepad as night falls over a crumbling city. He scribbles the letter I. He draws a heart. And then an N, and then a Y. Right away he knows he’s got something. This is it, he thinks. This is the campaign. The man was a designer named Milton Glaser. The city was New York. The year was 1977. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 5, 2013 - 25 comments

flown in to Japan to assess the damage done by Godzilla

As Thomas Pynchon's new novel Bleeding Edge's Sept. 17th release date approaches, New York Magazine's Vulture blog offers a capsule biography of the man. (SLVulture) [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Sep 2, 2013 - 43 comments

Energy crisis, industrial pollution, Kodachromes and more...

From The Atlantic, a series of photography that documents America in the 1970s: the Pacific Northwest | New York City | the Southwest | Chicago's African-American community | Texas [more inside]
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 29, 2013 - 20 comments

The past and the present are one

Ghosts of the past revisit little-changed streets and avenues of New York City in Famous Daily News photos brought back to life.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 22, 2013 - 19 comments

Strangers feeding strangers

Mealku is a service designed to help people obtain home-cooked meals, by connecting strangers online. It's sort of like AirBNB for leftovers as takeout meals, though right now it's only in New York City. An article from The Atlantic Cities describes Ted D’Cruz-Young's vision for the network and addresses concerns. “There’s always food left over. It’s nice to know it could be someone’s dinner", said one fan.
posted by knile on Aug 14, 2013 - 63 comments

WANTED: MACHO MEN WITH MUSTACHES

Looking around the room, the producers were thinking the same thing. Belolo grabbed a napkin and jotted down: “Indian, Construction Worker, Leatherman, Cowboy, Cop, Sailor.” Morali walked over to the Indian (Rose was, in fact, Lakota) who’d enticed them into the bar. He wasn’t shy. “Hey you, Indian—you want to be in a group?” (SLTheBeliever)
[more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Aug 1, 2013 - 32 comments

Lincoln Highway, the first (attempt at a) transcontinental US highway

On July 1, 1913, a group of automobile enthusiasts and industry officials established the Lincoln Highway Association "to procure the establishment of a continuous improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to lawful traffic of all description without toll charges," and to be a lasting memorial to Abraham Lincoln. The Lincoln Highway efforts started about three years before the first federal road act would provide funding to states to improve the broad network of roads. Never officially finished, the first transcontinental highway eventually became renumbered as various interstate and US routes. To celebrate its centennial, there was a cross-country tour in June. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 17, 2013 - 33 comments

"Hint: It's not about the kids."

In 2002, now-disgraced stock analyst Jack Grubman (previously) was the central figure in a preschool-placement scandal in New York's famously Wall Street connected 92nd Street Y.
The Price Of Perfection
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 16, 2013 - 34 comments

Liquid City

"For 400 years, New York has embraced, spurned, ignored, harnessed, and feared the water that made its greatness possible. Now our relationship must get even more complex." [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 8, 2013 - 19 comments

Subjective Cartography

If New York Were A Blank Slate, How Would You Fill It In? is a piece on Becky Cooper's book Mapping Manhattan: A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story in Maps by 75 New Yorkers both famous and not. Cooper's Map Your Memories tumblr. Found from Brain Pickings, which has much more. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 19, 2013 - 6 comments

Another world beneath the surface

Second Avenue Subway: New York's Excavation Project Looks Like A Moonscape (slide show)
posted by slogger on Jun 17, 2013 - 43 comments

America's 10 Worst Prisons

"'If you can't do the time, don't do the crime.' So goes the old saying. Yet conditions in some American facilities are so obscene that they amount to a form of extrajudicial punishment." Mother Jones is profiling "America's 10 Worst Prisons." Facilities were chosen for the list based on "...three years of research, correspondence with prisoners, and interviews with reform advocates." [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 14, 2013 - 88 comments

In a City of Hipstercrites

How I Became a Hipster (SLNYT)
posted by shivohum on May 2, 2013 - 155 comments

"how much of this distress existed pre-Sandy?"

After Sandy, a great and complex city reveals traumas new and old. "Occupy Sandy" represented a disaster cooperativism in opposition to "disaster capitalism" (previously: 1, 2, 3) [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 17, 2013 - 4 comments

Meet me at Hoyt & Schermerhorn at 3 on the dot

Street signs at NYC intersections featuring rap lyrics about them.
posted by dry white toast on Mar 25, 2013 - 27 comments

Pork sticky rolls are a REAL THING.

Here's the recipe for chef Hadley Schmitt's famous Pork Sticky Rolls with Dijon-Maple Glaze and Parsnip Icing served at Northern Spy Food Company, East Village, NYC.
posted by ericb on Mar 8, 2013 - 17 comments

NYC Past

NYC Past Large-format historical photos of New York City.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken on Mar 5, 2013 - 13 comments

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