433 posts tagged with newyorker.
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The new wave of student activism: the case of Oberlin

"On or about December, 2014, student character changed” The New Yorker looks at millennial politics. Nathan Heller talks to many students.
posted by doctornemo on May 24, 2016 - 82 comments

Making peace with missing out

For music fans, 2016 has quickly become the year of the insta-release. Are you overwhelmed? Excited? Numb and jaded? Checked out entirely? Have you tweeted out your hastily-formed opinion about the latest Big Event album before everyone moves on? Beyoncé, Radiohead and FOMO: How sustainable is the era of the “insta-release?” From March: The Music Critic in the Age of the Insta-Release
posted by naju on May 12, 2016 - 19 comments

Gold for people who already have enough gold

The Semiotics of Rose Gold
posted by BuddhaInABucket on May 5, 2016 - 18 comments

Slovenia's Astonishing Baby Dragons

What’s Behind Slovenia’s Love Affair with a Salamander?
posted by ChuraChura on Apr 28, 2016 - 9 comments

The Raw Appeal Of Game Of Thrones

Thrones of Blood: Binge-watching the most addictive show on television. SLNewYorker [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Apr 14, 2016 - 135 comments

“Whoops, I lost me muff!”

Arno the socialite stayed at the Ritz-Carlton until dawn, keeping Frazier company, and was captured in photos holding her hand while the 17-year-old looks utterly exhausted by the event. (She was.) Five nights earlier, Arno the satirist and his friends—publisher Condé Nast and George Balanchine among them—held a well-publicized debut at the nightclub Chez Firehouse for Miss Wilma Baard. A fashion model, Baard had spent much of her childhood on a Hoboken tugboat captained by her father, so reporters at the event dubbed it the debut of “Tugboat Minnie.” “I think most debutantes are dopes,” she told reporters. While Arno and his friends worked the receiving line in shifts, she stood there for hours, saying only of society that it made “my feet hurt.” - The Double Life of Peter Arno, The New Yorker's Most Influental Cartoonist by Ben Schwartz (NSFW warning: butts)
posted by The Whelk on Apr 6, 2016 - 26 comments

QUEEN.

"[I]f I’m stranded on a desert island, and have ten records to take, I know [Aretha Franklin is] in the collection. For she’ll remind me of my humanity. What’s essential in all of us. And she just sounds so damn good," writes President Obama. "Here’s a tip: when you’re deejaying a party, open with ‘Rock Steady.’ " David Remnick profiles Aretha Franklin for The New Yorker: "Soul Survivor." [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Apr 1, 2016 - 28 comments

Maybe I should have marinated the chicken a little longer

Excessively Candid FoodNetwork.com Recipe Reviews (SLNewYorker)
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Mar 26, 2016 - 21 comments

Toward Truthiness: "After the Fact"

"The era of the fact is coming to an end: the place once held by 'facts' is being taken over by 'data.'...No matter the bigness of the data, the vastness of the Web, the freeness of speech, nothing could be less well settled in the twenty-first century than whether people know what they know from faith or from facts, or whether anything, in the end, can really be said to be fully proved." Jill Lepore's essay for The New Yorker, "After the Fact," looks at the current state of American politics as a symptom of a bigger question: Whose reality is it, anyway? [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Mar 17, 2016 - 49 comments

How 'Dark Money' Shapes US Politics

Jane Mayer takes on the Koch Brothers [1,2,3] - "For decades, billionaire libertarians Charles and David Koch have spent millions trying to reduce the size of government and slash regulations, making the brothers a target of the political Left and campaign finance reformers. But few people have dug deeper into the Koch empire and family history than New Yorker staff writer Jane Mayer, author of the new book 'Dark Money'. Among other revelations, she alleges that the brothers hired private detectives to investigate her after she published articles critical of them. We talk to Mayer about the book and about what the rise of Donald Trump means for the Kochs and their allies." (previously)
posted by kliuless on Mar 14, 2016 - 20 comments

The List

When juveniles are found guilty of sexual misconduct, the sex-offender registry can be a life sentence.--Longform by Sarah Stillman in the New Yorker.
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 7, 2016 - 21 comments

Fishdog River Brewing Co.’s Ultimate I.P.A.

"When we started developing the recipe for the Ultimate I.P.A., back in 2004, we had one goal: to concoct an ale so utterly undrinkable that the craft-beer community would have no option but to shower it with praise." [SLNewYorker]
posted by schmod on Feb 18, 2016 - 93 comments

Indignant Comments Below

"Last season, this thing was not a thing,” says trend spotter, a freelance expert." 'Trend Piece' by Rosemary Counter.
posted by The Whelk on Feb 16, 2016 - 42 comments

I’m going to call my sister & order sushi. You should do something, too.

Valentine's Day Poems for Married People - by John Kenney (SLNewYorker) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 14, 2016 - 23 comments

one weird trick that makes a novel addictive

Catherine Nichols on the technique of adaptation. [more inside]
posted by flex on Feb 8, 2016 - 27 comments

"...preferably under the wheels of an M103 bus."

"Ed Koch once said that "to be a New Yorker you have to live here for six months, and if at the end of the six months you find you walk faster, talk faster, think faster, you're a New Yorker." On the search to find the realest answer (is it "until you cry on the subway"?), we decided to hit the pavement to ask locals to finish the sentence for us. "
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 8, 2016 - 50 comments

20/20 vision in the world of high-end art

A painting commissioned for the firm’s hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary, “Transport Through the Ages,” hung above the reception desk. Bouvier insists that he never used confidential information from his logistics business to buy and sell paintings. None of the thirty-five works that he sold Rybolovlev were in storage with Natural Le Coultre. “I have the information not because I am a shipper,” he said. “It is because I am clever.”
The high-end of the art market is full of mystery, built on trust, reputation, and secrecy. What happens when someone starts turning all of that on its head? An art shipper, Russian oligarch, and a Rothko in The Bouvier Affair. (Sam Knight, for The New Yorker)
posted by redct on Feb 2, 2016 - 12 comments

I hope we can still be cousins

You may have seen the work of cartoonist Matthew Diffee in The New Yorker. The guy has a twisted sense of humor. But not all of his work makes in into the august magazine. So he collected some of his rejected ideas, and others from fellow cartoonists like Roz Chast and Gahan Wilson into The Best of the Rejection Collection: 293 Cartoons That Were Too Dumb, Too Dark, or Too Naughty for The New Yorker. Here's a selection.
posted by gottabefunky on Jan 21, 2016 - 20 comments

The story of my success, if it is anything, is a paean to laziness.

Internet hero Frank Chimero conquers the New Yorker
posted by Diablevert on Jan 12, 2016 - 15 comments

Ashima Shiraishi, Rock-Climbing Wonder

Ashima Shiraishi is a fourteen-year-old New Yorker who has been called the most talented rock climber in the world.
posted by mossicle on Jan 11, 2016 - 41 comments

Existential Riddles

"Which is heavier, a ton of feathers or a ton of gold? Everything is equal in a cruelly indifferent universe." Existential Riddles by Ethan Kuperberg.
posted by jcreigh on Jan 5, 2016 - 17 comments

It couldn't have happened to a nicer guy

The Sudden But Well-Deserved Fall of Rahm Emanuel. By Rick Perlstein, New Yorker. Puts the rising number of calls for Emanuel to resign as mayor of Chicago in context.
posted by Halloween Jack on Jan 4, 2016 - 62 comments

Here children are killed at public expense.

The Best Facts I Learned from Reading books in 2015. "Last year, I learned a piece of information so startling that I spent months repeating it to anyone who would listen."
posted by blue_beetle on Jan 4, 2016 - 49 comments

“...things get broken, and sometimes they get repaired,”

Debate erupts as Hanya Yanagihara's editor takes on critic over bad review of A Little Life. [The Guardian] The editor of Hanya Yanagihara’s bestselling novel A Little Life has taken to the pages of the New York Review of Books to defend his author from a review that claimed the novel “duped” its readers “into confusing anguish and ecstasy, pleasure and pain”. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Dec 4, 2015 - 30 comments

The New Yorker's Animated Cover

This week’s cover, “Mirror:” a collaboration between The New Yorker (Ware) and the radio program “This American Life" (Glass) and Hanna Rosin.
posted by OmieWise on Nov 30, 2015 - 26 comments

I’m sweet, I’m red, and I plop out of a can.

"...judging from the looks on all of your faces, I seem to be the only one who thought there was a problem. Am I correct? Wow. All right. Unbelievable." The Cranberry Sauce Has Something To Say (SLNewYorker)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 26, 2015 - 37 comments

The Space Doctor and his Big Idea

A man who draws pictures for the computer explains the space doctor's big idea about time and space using only simple words. [more inside]
posted by schmod on Nov 19, 2015 - 29 comments

"I wanted to go to Heaven.”

[Megan] Phelps-Roper spent the summer and the fall in an existential spiral. She would conclude that everything about Westboro’s doctrine was wrong, only to be seized with terror that these thoughts were a test from God, and she was failing. “You literally feel insane,” she said. Eventually, her doubts won out. “I just couldn’t keep up the charade,” she said. “I couldn’t bring myself to do the things we were doing and say the things we were saying.” - How a prized daughter of the Westboro Baptist Church came to question its beliefs. (content warning : extreme homophobic & anti-Semitic language)
posted by nadawi on Nov 16, 2015 - 64 comments

“The aims of life are the best defense against death.”

The Art of Witness by James Wood [The New Yorker] How Primo Levi survived.
“Primo Levi [wiki] did not consider it heroic to have survived eleven months in Auschwitz. Like other witnesses of the concentration camps, he lamented that the best had perished and the worst had survived. But we who have survived relatively little find it hard to believe him. How could it be anything but heroic to have entered Hell and not been swallowed up? To have witnessed it with such delicate lucidity, such reserves of irony and even equanimity? Our incomprehension and our admiration combine to simplify the writer into a needily sincere amalgam: hero, saint, witness, redeemer.”
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Nov 2, 2015 - 8 comments

“That one is ridiculed by its fellow-birds for its stupidity”

The improbable emergence of Nell Zink.
posted by holmesian on Oct 25, 2015 - 9 comments

It started with bedtime. A coldness. A formality.

"Cold Little Bird," a very good and very disturbing story by Ben Marcus. [SLNYer]
posted by gottabefunky on Oct 23, 2015 - 77 comments

"If this was the law of Nature, why waste any time in awe or pity?”

Thoreau was kind of a dick. Actually, more than "kind of." He was, in fact, a huge, total dick. (OK, he was a strident and powerful abolitionist. But somehow he managed to be a dick about that too.) [more inside]
posted by neroli on Oct 13, 2015 - 111 comments

“Nobody ages like anybody else.”

What old age is really like. Getting beyond "Generic Old Man" and "Eccentric Old Woman" by examining literature by 'natives' of old age.
posted by BuddhaInABucket on Oct 2, 2015 - 6 comments

Hi, I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn.

A New Caption That Works for Every New Yorker Cartoon (SLTheAtlantic). (via Frank Chimero). [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Sep 22, 2015 - 49 comments

Take *that*, assholes

A Modest Proposal - David Sedaris talks about the pros and cons of getting hitched
posted by a lungful of dragon on Sep 21, 2015 - 30 comments

Inside Apple's design studio with Jony

Ian Parker from the New Yorker managed to secure time with and access to Apple's chief designer, Sir Jonathan Ive so as to write this extended profile of the man, his obsessively secretive workplace - and his dislike of orangey-brown..
posted by rongorongo on Sep 10, 2015 - 44 comments

I guess they thought that amassing land was important.

My Nephew Has Some Questions (Jesse Eisenberg in The New Yorker)
posted by davidjmcgee on Sep 3, 2015 - 33 comments

The Birds: Why the passenger pigeon became extinct

"One hunter recalled a nighttime visit to a swamp in Ohio in 1845, when he was sixteen; he mistook for haystacks what were in fact alder and willow trees, bowed to the ground under gigantic pyramids of birds many bodies deep." In his new book about the passenger pigeon, the naturalist Joel Greenberg sets out to answer a puzzling question: How could the bird go from a population of billions to zero in less than fifty years? (SLNewYorker.) [more inside]
posted by Rangi on Sep 3, 2015 - 48 comments

The New Markov

The Verge has developed a way to game the New Yorker cartoon caption contest (previously: 1 2 christ what an asshole 4), in the sense that roulette and chuck-a-luck are games.
posted by BiggerJ on Aug 30, 2015 - 31 comments

Istanbul’s city planners have a problem: too much history

If fifteen houses are built on top of one another, which one is the most important? The Big Dig, a long read about shipwrecks under Istanbul, archaeological "surplus", Neolithic footprints, elephants fed to lions, and the collision of modern city planning imperatives with a glut of priceless antiquities. SLNewYorker. [more inside]
posted by RedOrGreen on Aug 26, 2015 - 16 comments

“Turtles are allowed, but no photography.”

What do an alpaca, a turtle, a snake, a pig, and a turkey have in common? They're all animals that New Yorker writer Patricia Marx passed off as emotional support animals, with varying results.
posted by carrienation on Aug 9, 2015 - 67 comments

Shirley Jackson on writing

The New Yorker has recently put online three short essays on writing by novelist and short story writer Shirley Jackson, author of The Lottery and The Haunting of Hill House. They are Memory and Delusion, On Fans and Fan Mail and Garlic in Fiction, where she sets out her methodology of writing fiction. You can read one of Jackson's short stories on The New Yorker's website, Paranoia, and an interview she did with her son.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 4, 2015 - 12 comments

Learning to Speak Lingerie

"Days start late, and nights run long; they ignore the Spring Festival and sell briskly after sundown during Ramadan. Winter is better than summer. Mother’s Day is made for lingerie. But nothing compares with Valentine’s Day, so this year I celebrated the holiday by saying goodbye to my wife, driving four hours to Asyut, and watching people buy underwear at the China Star shop until almost midnight." Chinese lingerie merchants in Egypt. (New Yorker via Longform)
posted by pravit on Aug 3, 2015 - 10 comments

Ronald Reagan and Reading Proust

"Maybe the story is the difference between the writers on the panels and the writers in the audience. That story is the creation of a celebrity class. That story is the fine line between jealousy and envy: I want everything you have versus I want everything I can have. Or is the story simply vanity?" Choire Sicha of the Awl reports on (and attempts to schmooze through) the two-day New Yorker literary festival
posted by The Whelk on Jul 28, 2015 - 4 comments

"Poets of the world, ignite! You have nothing to lose but your brains!"

Joe Gould died well over half a century ago after having been gone from his haunts in Greenwich for half a decade. He had been a fixture in the Village for decades, friend to famous writers and artists, living in penury while saying he was working on a massively long work called Oral History of Our Time (coining the term [pdf] "oral history" in the process) from which only a few short pieces were ever published. In the 40s he became famous thanks to a profile called "Professor Sea Gull" written by star New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell. After Gould's death, Mitchell wrote another profile in 1964, "Joe Gould's Secret", where Mitchell said that the Oral History only existed in Gould's mind. After that article, Mitchell never published again in his lifetime despite being on The New Yorker's staff until his death in 1996. Since then, various further secrets have been unearthed about Gould, diaries from the 40s, the identity of Gould's mysterious patron, and now New Yorker writer Jill Lepore has written about Gould's whereabouts in the last years in his life, and much else, in a sad profile called Joe Gould's Teeth. [Joe Gould previously]
posted by Kattullus on Jul 21, 2015 - 10 comments

Cascadia Subduction Zone

An earthquake will destroy a sizable portion of the coastal Northwest. The question is when.
posted by Artw on Jul 13, 2015 - 269 comments

Megasoid, 2007-2009 (or, RIYL BANGERZZZZZZZZ, LAZER BASS, & THE AUGHTS)

Megasoid started in the winter of 2006/2007 as a Montreal-based mobile soundsystem making aggressive street-bass and remix music. For the following 3 years Vaughn Robert Squire and Hadji Bakara spent their time playing their music out of vans, throwing amps in basements for live sets, lugging modular synths to rooftops of hotels, and setting up big PAs under bridges and at after-hours spots [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Jul 10, 2015 - 6 comments

No. 21: Who is making all this coffee?

What I Assume Honoré de Balzac Thought After Drinking Each of His 50 Daily Cups of Coffee (SLNewYorker) [more inside]
posted by joechip on Jul 9, 2015 - 50 comments

The roads of Chittenden County

Until this year, Vermont had never formally decommissioned any roads. Ever. This has had some implications.... [via jessamyn's Twitter]
posted by Chrysostom on Jul 1, 2015 - 24 comments

Made of the Same Metal

The Families Who Negotiated With ISIS - "Until recently, they had not known of one another, or of the unexpected benefactor who had brought them together. They were the parents of five Americans who had been kidnapped in Syria." [more inside]
posted by sallybrown on Jul 1, 2015 - 6 comments

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