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361 posts tagged with newyorker.
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"Was it a bad shoot? Or a good shoot?"

Your Son Is Deceased The shooting of Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri, looked almost routine to people in Albuquerque. The city has one of the highest rates in the country of fatal shootings by police, but no officer has been indicted. Of the sixty-three officers who joined the Albuquerque police force in 2007, ten eventually shot people.
posted by joedan on Jan 28, 2015 - 34 comments

Does she get any respect?

Serena Williams, America's greatest athlete (New Yorker)
... But it’s not enough to say that Williams would be more uniformly adored if she were a white woman, or a man. Instead, the failure to fully appreciate her importance is perhaps evidence of our inability to appreciate the stubbornly unfamiliar narrative arc of her career. Williams is underloved because, at times, she has been unlovable and, in the end, mostly unrepentant about it—something that might be admired as iconoclastic in a male athlete, but rarely endears women to a wide audience. ... [T]he great crisis in her public persona came later, in 2009, when she was penalized the final point in her U.S. Open semifinal against Kim Clijsters after berating a line judge over a foot-fault call on the previous serve. Williams is indeed singular: she is likely the only person ever to utter on a professional tennis court, “I swear to God, I’m fucking going to take this fucking ball and shove it down your fucking throat, you hear that? I swear to God.” (Of course, John McEnroe said things that weren’t so different, and he is beloved for it.)
Just the other day, she was asked to twirl in front of male reporters during an interview.
posted by Melismata on Jan 22, 2015 - 214 comments

Where is the Internet’s memory, the history of our time?

“Every time a light blinks, someone is uploading or downloading,” Kahle explains. Six hundred thousand people use the Wayback Machine every day, conducting two thousand searches a second. “You can see it.” He smiles as he watches. “They’re glowing books!” He waves his arms. “They glow when they’re being read!”
The Cobweb: Jill Lepore on whether the internet can be archieved, the Wayback Machine, the downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17, the complications of attempting to put a time dimension on a two dimensional medium and the almost destruction of the footnote. Featuring a cameo by MeFi's favourite archivist, Jason Scott.
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 20, 2015 - 6 comments

Runs smiling face infinitely looped

We Know How You Feel Computers are learning to read emotion, and the business world can’t wait.
posted by infini on Jan 18, 2015 - 61 comments

I am the actual worst.

Let’s Get Drinks
posted by artsandsci on Jan 14, 2015 - 42 comments

"I'll be honest: I don’t want to stay up until 4 AM any more at shows"

Music critic Sasha Frere-Jones is leaving The New Yorker to annotate lyrics at Genius. Here's his first post.
posted by Going To Maine on Jan 13, 2015 - 47 comments

KidZania, KidZania, you’re always in my heart

At Kidzania, the theme-park chain where children pretend to be adults, children from Mexico to Kuwait can learn about responsibility and citizenship by renting go-karts, making Quaker granola bars, delivering packages for DHL, cleaning up dog poop, making plastic gewgaws, and flying planes, but they may not be able to answer the important questions "Is it a school? Is it a nursery? Is it some devil-run thing that isn’t acceptable in our culture?"
posted by snarkout on Jan 13, 2015 - 38 comments

Gone Girl, gun violence, and the media's focus on the media

The New Yorker's "Most-Read" Blog Posts of 2014. The New Yorker's most-read blog posts and magazine stories of 2013. And for the one most-important article in each issue of the magazine (according to one San Franciscan), there's The New Yorkerest. [more inside]
posted by psoas on Dec 30, 2014 - 2 comments

It's as if he were the wind or weather itself.

Vyacheslav Korotki is a man of extreme solitude. He is a trained polyarnik, a specialist in the polar north, a meteorologist.
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 10, 2014 - 7 comments

One flushes and bucks

Rodeo bulls, like the boys who dream of riding them, are unpredictable creatures. They can start out shy and skittish, then suddenly turn ornery. They’ll lie down in the chute one day and try to gore you the next. The most dangerous bull ever ridden, by some accounts, began as a scrawny yellow calf in 1988.
The Ride of Their Lives: Children prepare for the world’s most dangerous organized sport.
– A longform article from The New Yorker
posted by Joe in Australia on Dec 8, 2014 - 7 comments

zugzwang

The Mysterious Disappearance of Peter Winston: How does one of the world’s top chess prodigies just vanish from a New York street? - by Sarah Weinman [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 5, 2014 - 15 comments

The Quiet German

The New Yorker on 'the astonishing rise of Angela Merkel, the most powerful woman in the world.'
posted by Quilford on Nov 27, 2014 - 49 comments

Almost 530,000 words long—still a little shorter than “Infinite Jest.”

Paul Ford explains the long road to HTML5 and the web standardisations process in the New Yorker.
In “Gathering of the Player Men at Buffalo,” the Music Trade Review described a heady scene in which Mr. P. B. Klugh, speaking for the Cable Company, said that it had adopted “the nine-to-the-inch scale” and that “they were not open to argument on the subject, as such a scale had given entire satisfaction.” Swayed, the manufacturers resolved the issue in favor of Klugh. As a result, we now live in a world where nine-holes-per-inch piano rolls are the standard. You would be a fool to build a player piano to any other metric.
Of course, the Web page is far more complex. It requires dozens of standards, governing words, sounds, pictures, interactions, protocols, code, and more. The role of Web parliament is played by the W3C, the World Wide Web Consortium. This is a standards body; it organizes meetings that allow competing groups to define standards, shepherding them from a “working draft” to “candidate recommendation” and “proposed recommendation,” and finally, if a standard has been sufficiently poked and prodded, granting the ultimate imprimatur, “W3C recommendation.”

posted by frimble on Nov 24, 2014 - 11 comments

VERSION 2.0: “New Testament” expansion pack. Adds Jesus features.

1.6 “Sodom and Gomorrah” N.S.F.W. glitch identified and removed. Bible now free of “Homosexuality” virus. . .
2.7 “Jesus AutoSave” feature. Restores Jesus to previously saved form three days after data loss. . .
6.9 Limited-edition Kanye West Messiah edition available. “Yeezus” features added. . .

"Bible System Updates" by Megan Amram for Shouts & Murmurs (The New Yorker)
posted by Atom Eyes on Nov 20, 2014 - 15 comments

Wasting Time on the Internet 101

The New Yorker's Kenneth Goldsmith tells why he's planning to teach a course called "Wasting Time on the Internet" at the University of Pennsylvania. [more inside]
posted by ourt on Nov 18, 2014 - 29 comments

“the human element was vital for this series”

“Best Before End”: Photographing Energy Drinks [The New Yorker] In “Best Before End,” Stephen Gill in processes film negatives in a variety of popular energy drinks. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Nov 17, 2014 - 3 comments

good game

I confess to being bewildered, still, by what is often said to be the greatest game of StarCraft II ever played. Fall, 2013. New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom. Scarlett vs. Bomber. Third game in a best-of-three series, a quarter-final in a tournament sponsored by Red Bull. It lasted about forty minutes, although I gathered, from the live commentary on the video that I have watched many times, that it nearly ended far sooner. A couple of minutes in, there came this exchange:

“Uh-oh. Oh, my God! Scarlett is going gas!”

“Oh—oh, God!”

“Gas pool! And it’s a double proxy. Bomber is walking into the worst possible situation.”

posted by cthuljew on Nov 17, 2014 - 101 comments

On Gluten

Against the Grain
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Nov 1, 2014 - 114 comments

Where stray or personal thoughts have intruded, you may delete them.

"Black Box," a futuristic spy story by Jennifer Egan. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Oct 31, 2014 - 13 comments

Music is the cup that holds the wine of silence

“Select a note,’’ [Robert Fripp] told them, “and then, in silence, establish a relationship with that note. Keep it within you until you can no longer contain it and must give it voice.’’

"Surviving a Weekend with the Wizard of Prog Rock"
posted by oakroom on Oct 31, 2014 - 19 comments

“The desserts are over there,”

Supping At Sea: [The New Yorker] The ups and downs of cruise-ship cuisine.
posted by Fizz on Oct 27, 2014 - 61 comments

The Naysayers

Alex Ross writes for the New Yorker: Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and the critique of pop culture.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 27, 2014 - 32 comments

What the garbageman doesn't know

After a New Yorker piece (previously) on one of Cairo's trash collectors went viral in Cairo, several issues regarding consent of the illiterate Sayyid, as well as possible threats against him, have come up. The author, Peter Hessler, responded in a Facebook post to some of these issues, but it seems that the story is more complicated with accusations that Hessler did not adequately inform Sayyid of what had been written, resulting in retaliation by the people he works for.
posted by sherief on Oct 27, 2014 - 14 comments

The Obama Legacy

The Obama Brief: The President considers his judicial legacy. (SL New Yorker)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 20, 2014 - 30 comments

She says I’m always “Apollo 13 this” and “Lunokhod that”

Tom Hanks, somewhat of an authority on going to the moon, wrote about it in The New Yorker. (You, too, can write like Tom Hanks!)
posted by emelenjr on Oct 20, 2014 - 19 comments

Da da da Dead

Beethoven's bad influence - Alex Ross ponders if veneration of him stifled his successors.
posted by Gyan on Oct 14, 2014 - 27 comments

Some say Ebola is the Milosevic of West Nile virus.

Teju Cole on Ebola media hysteria (SLNewYorkerHumor)
posted by matildaben on Oct 8, 2014 - 30 comments

What the Garbageman Knows

On a different floor, we picked our way across a landing covered with rotting food; a pile of trash bags had been ripped apart by stray cats. “This one’s a foreigner,” Sayyid explained. “I’m not supposed to touch her garbage. The landlord isn’t happy with her; there’s some kind of fight. He told me not to remove her trash.” (SLNewYorker) [more inside]
posted by Corduroy on Oct 7, 2014 - 24 comments

~~~~(;,,;)~~~~

Why not eat octopus? [New Yorker]
"I like to think of an octopus as a blobby, eight-fingered hand with a mind of its own. And then I’m suddenly not so keen on the idea of eating it."

posted by Fizz on Oct 3, 2014 - 73 comments

Before The Law

In Before The Law, Jennifer Gonnerman, writing for The New Yorker, tells the story of Kalief Browder, who was unjustly accused of taking a backpack. He spent the next three years on Rikers Island before the charges were dismissed.
posted by ob1quixote on Oct 1, 2014 - 16 comments

how the rich fly

what it's like to fly the $23,000 Singapore Airlines Suites Class (includes lots of photos) [more inside]
posted by flex on Sep 30, 2014 - 175 comments

"Nothing fades away anymore."

The Solace of Oblivion by Jeffrey Toobin [The New Yorker] "In Europe, the right to be forgotten trumps the Internet."
posted by Fizz on Sep 22, 2014 - 22 comments

“Oh, this is where the science I like is.”

How Long Does It Take to Get to Tatooine? [The New Yorker] "We use much more brainpower on subjects that interest us."
posted by Fizz on Sep 20, 2014 - 17 comments

We Are The Robots

The Vocoder, a short New Yorker video (11:30) about the military origins of the vocoder. The vocoder—the musical instrument that gave Kraftwerk its robotic sound—began as an early telecommunications device and a top-secret military encoding machine.
posted by ultraviolet catastrophe on Sep 18, 2014 - 14 comments

"our healthy but preposterous need to make lists"

The Perfect Beat is an article by The New Yorker's music critic Sasha Frere Jones where he lays out the reasoning behind his "Perfect Recordings" project, essentially a list of 200 songs that fit his personal criteria for perfection. The lists are available as Twitter timelines (volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5), Spotify playlists (volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5) or as one 200 song Rdio playlist. Frere-Jones answered some questions about the project and spoke about a few individual songs in The Guardian.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 8, 2014 - 46 comments

Why can't our education system be more like theirs?

In China, there are now more than 200 Waldorf elementary schools, filled with the children whose parents are looking for a more child-centered alternative to the test-driven state education system. Why can't Chinese schools be more like American schools? Meanwhile, in America, Stephen Pinker argues that Harvard and other elite universities are wasting their resources on athletes and musicians, and should select students by standardized test scores, the way Chinese colleges do. Why can't American schools be more like Chinese schools?
posted by escabeche on Sep 7, 2014 - 56 comments

"...that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow."

Why Walking Helps Us Think: [The New Yorker] In a variety of ways, going for a stroll keeps our brains on their toes.
posted by Fizz on Sep 6, 2014 - 25 comments

“...every angel has a past and every sinner has a future.”

Staten Island’s Pill Problem: [The New Yorker] "New York City is the heroin capital of the country, and the epidemic has hit its most tranquil borough the hardest."
posted by Fizz on Sep 1, 2014 - 18 comments

instructions from Superman's dad

"But not doing things too disastrously is not some minimal achievement; it is a maximal achievement, rarely managed." Does it help to know history?
posted by theodolite on Aug 29, 2014 - 46 comments

I have only the vaguest memory of a life before fear.

Lena Dunham writes about her childhood anxieties, and growing up in therapy. (SLNewYorker)
posted by magstheaxe on Aug 26, 2014 - 131 comments

The Troll Slayer

A profile of classicist Mary Beard, and, among other things, her decision to confront sexist detractors online. "The real issue, she suggested, is not merely guaranteeing a woman’s right to speak; it is being aware of the prejudices that we bring to the way we hear her. Listening, she implied, is an essential element of speech."
posted by OmieWise on Aug 25, 2014 - 22 comments

A heart rather than a phone call.

A Memoir Is Not a Status Update by Dani Shapiro [The New Yorker] "What would have become of me if I had come of age as a writer during these years of living out loud?"
posted by Fizz on Aug 18, 2014 - 20 comments

“May cause dizziness, sexual nightmares, and sleep crime.”

[...] others resist sleep and embrace the woozy, out-of-body license. To some, this is an opportunity to take part in what Rachel Uchitel, a former girlfriend of Tiger Woods, has reportedly described as “crazy Ambien sex.” [more inside]
posted by the young rope-rider on Aug 16, 2014 - 138 comments

Reasoning with your muscles.

Every Good Boy Does Fine: A life in piano lessons. [SLNewYorker]
posted by Lutoslawski on Aug 11, 2014 - 16 comments

The radiance of life

"Woolf often conceives of life this way: as a gift that you've been given, which you must hold onto and treasure but never open. Opening it would dispel the atmosphere, ruin the radiance—and the radiance of life is what makes it worth living. It's hard to say just what holding onto life without looking at it might mean; that's one of the puzzles of her books. But it has something to do with preserving life's mystery…" Virginia Woolf's Idea of Privacy
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 10, 2014 - 11 comments

Nina Simone's raised voice

“My skin is black,” the first woman’s story begins, “my arms are long.” And, to a slow and steady beat, “my hair is woolly, my back is strong.” Singing in a club in Holland, in 1965, Nina Simone introduced a song she had written about what she called “four Negro women” to a young, homogeneously white, and transfixed crowd. “And one of the women’s hair,” she instructed, brushing her hand lightly across her own woolly Afro, “is like mine.”
posted by ChuraChura on Aug 6, 2014 - 23 comments

Poking the Jazz Hive

On July 31st the New Yorker posted on Shouts and Murmurs: "Sonny Rollins: In His Own Words BY DJANGO GOLD". Plenty of people were not pleased. Including, yes, Sonny Rollins himself. (The editor's note on Shouts and Murmurs was added afterwards and was not part of the initial publishing of the piece)
posted by josher71 on Aug 5, 2014 - 91 comments

The truth is stranger than fiction

From behind the New Yorker's temporarily removed paywall, a postmodern murder mystery from Poland in 2007.
posted by ellieBOA on Jul 25, 2014 - 10 comments

"wait for a bunch of old ideas to die in order for a church to live"

A Church Divided Over Marriage Equality
The Church’s rules against homosexuality have divided Methodists for forty years. Attempts to abolish or even soften these rules have failed at every General Conference, the quadrennial meeting of the denomination, since they were first added, in 1972, to the Book of Discipline, which contains the Church’s laws and doctrine.

"And They Will Know We Are Christians by Our Love"
"Methodists should call meeting on gay divide, pastor says"
"Ranks of defiant United Methodist clergy rise"
"Defrocking of Minister Widens Split Over Gays"
posted by davidstandaford on Jul 23, 2014 - 22 comments

Guy Walks Into a Bar

And the bartender's, like, "No kidding. You think I wished for a twelve-inch pianist?" So the guy processes this. (SLNewYorker) [more inside]
posted by Metroid Baby on Jul 23, 2014 - 138 comments

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