423 posts tagged with npr.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 423. Subscribe:

case/lang/veirs

The whole album, performed live at OPB in Portland, OR. (SLNPR) Previously.
posted by sutureselves on Jun 22, 2016 - 15 comments

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

Time to celebrate Asian and Pacific Islanders who have enriched America! You can start here, a joint venture by several agencies, and continue below the fold. [more inside]
posted by numaner on May 5, 2016 - 4 comments

Frampton Comes Alive! (on NPR)

Peter Frampton performs a Tiny Desk Concert on NPR for 17 minute of pure joy.
posted by schmod on Apr 28, 2016 - 16 comments

The fight for the future of NPR

A slow-moving bureaucracy. An antiquated business model. A horde of upstart competitors. Can National Public Radio survive?
posted by Kitteh on Apr 18, 2016 - 122 comments

First Listen: Santana IV

Carlos Santana and his band Santana release their 24th album Santana IV next week. NPR offers up a first listen. It reunites most of the Woodstock-era band for the first time in 45 years.
posted by hippybear on Apr 8, 2016 - 31 comments

Mugs of NPR

MugsOfNPR.tumblr.com
posted by zamboni on Mar 30, 2016 - 27 comments

There Are Many Ways To Say I Love You

Singer and educator François Clemmons is probably best remembered by several generations of Americans as Officer Clemmons from Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. On their weekly segment on NPR's Morning Edition today, StoryCorps featured an interview with Clemmons about his original reluctance to play the part in the racially-heated days of the late 1960s, his realization of the importance of presenting a black role model to children, and ultimately his life-long friendship with Fred Rogers. [more inside]
posted by briank on Mar 11, 2016 - 14 comments

First Listen Live: Esperanza Spalding, 'Emily's D+Evolution'

Fulfilling the performance-art vision of her spirit-muse Emily, Esperanza Spalding played the music of her forthcoming album Emily's D+Evolution in concert at BRIC House in Brooklyn, N.Y. [1h3m video] on Thursday, March 3. WFUV and NPR Music presented a live video webstream of the performance as part of the First Listen Live series. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Mar 10, 2016 - 4 comments

"Any kind of performance is valuable, because every person is valuable."

Gaelynn Lea is the winner of NPR Music's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest for her haunting composition, "Someday We'll Linger in the Sun" [more inside]
posted by castlebravo on Mar 4, 2016 - 16 comments

Ya Momma So Black

Ya Momma So Black... [more inside]
posted by cashman on Feb 28, 2016 - 11 comments

After Thirty Years of Guilt - "My Burden Has Been Reduced"

Last month NPR reported a story about Bob Ebeling, one of the NASA engineers who tried, and failed, to stop the Challenger launch thirty years ago. His guilt and depression touched the hearts of many listeners, who wrote Mr. Ebeling, telling him he did all he could and wasn't to blame. Those letters have finally helped him move past the guilt.
posted by blurker on Feb 25, 2016 - 37 comments

Alabama Shakes

Brittany Howard On Small-Town Life, Big-Time Music - "Howard was raised on her father's junkyard in the small town of Athens, Ala. 'It was a really interesting way to grow up', she tells Fresh Air." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 30, 2016 - 14 comments

Symphony No. 4

Perhaps you remember Henryk Górecki's Symphony No. 3 "Symphony Of Sorrowful Songs", which became a surprise international hit after a BBC DJ played its haunting first movement in its entirety one day, shocking and surprising everyone with its slowly building fugue of energy that peaked with the entrance of Dawn Upshaw's soprano voice and then slowly ebbed back down into nothingness again like a musical palindrome. Well, now for something completely different: NPR brings us the a First Listen to the posthumously completed (by his son, from a piano score with notes for orchestration) Symphony No. 4, "Tansman Episodes", which NPR says "pounds, growls, swaggers and confounds."
posted by hippybear on Jan 15, 2016 - 10 comments

"Folks at NPR thought, 'Oh good grief, we're selling out to Hollywood.'"

In 1981, NPR affiliate station KUSC hatched a bold plan to adapt George Lucas’ Star Wars for radio. Easily the most visual film of the last decade, Star Wars as a listening experience seemed like an unlikely idea, but Lucas sold them the rights to adapt the hit movie for one dollar, and opened the Lucasfilm vaults to the show’s producers: Star Wars sound effects would be available to them in their raw form, along with every note of John Williams’ music. The cast was a mixture of original Star Wars cast members, Hollywood veterans, and future TV and movie stars still in the early stages of their careers. Novelist Brian Daley and Director John Madden then turned the first three films into "movies to watch with your eyes closed." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 20, 2015 - 46 comments

A post about grammar and pro sports. What could go wrong?

Footbal fans ,NOT, writ, so gud. Aficionados of basketball, however, are erudite. Baseball fans are ok. Grammarly has graded a number of comments from sports related websites for grammar and spelling, then tabulated the results by league, team and city.
posted by jacquilynne on Dec 16, 2015 - 17 comments

The Wild Reeds

The Wild Reeds play a tiny desk concert
posted by So You're Saying These Are Pants? on Dec 12, 2015 - 6 comments

NPR’s Book Concierge

Once again, NPR has organized their list of the year's best books into the Book Concierge, a recommendation engine with 29 categories - everything from It's All Geek to Me to The Dark Side to Eye-Opening Reads - available to mix, match, and sort.
posted by everybody had matching towels on Dec 8, 2015 - 11 comments

Walking on Tigers' Tails

“The distance between the station and the train was accurately measured ... I was not nervous as it approached and I leaped without hesitation,” she recalled. She landed safely, but the rocking motion of the train rolled her straight toward the end of the car. Just before being pitched off, “I caught hold of an air vent and hung on.” Then, with a sense of the dramatic, silent film actress Helen Gibson let her body “dangle over the edge to increase the effect on the screen.” [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 4, 2015 - 5 comments

It's Christmas, Charlie Brown

"So as much as A Charlie Brown Christmas is about the significance of the religious tradition as what Christmas is "really about," it sees that tradition at least in part as a gateway to, and an inspiration for, other actions. It doesn't only suggest Christmas is really about the Bible story; it suggests Christmas is also really about friends, dogs, cooperating, the beauty of humble things, singing out loud, and hope." Linda Holmes, "'A Charlie Brown Christmas' At 50," for NPR's Monkey See. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Nov 30, 2015 - 57 comments

"To be alone with the night, and his voice."

"Father Cares: The Last of Jonestown" is a hypnotic, disturbing, and mostly forgotten 1981 radio documentary about Jim Jones and the Peoples Temple. [more inside]
posted by ryanshepard on Nov 18, 2015 - 7 comments

"So many have died to defend what you see here."

You were taught in school that the rain forest is like the lungs of our planet.

It’s not that simple.

posted by zarq on Nov 12, 2015 - 17 comments

Discover something new

"It isn’t easy to discover new podcasts. There are just SO many out there. Sometimes the best approach is to simply turn to a friend and say, 'Hey, what are you listening to these days?'" So, NPR has created earbud.fm, a "friendly guide to great podcasts."
posted by zarq on Nov 3, 2015 - 82 comments

From WHYY In Philadelphia

Terry Gross and the Art of Opening Up
This fall, Gross marks her 40th anniversary hosting "Fresh Air." At 64, she is "the most effective and beautiful interviewer of people on the planet," as Marc Maron said recently, while introducing an episode of his podcast, "WTF," that featured a conversation with Gross. She’s deft on news and subtle on history, sixth-sensey in probing personal biography and expert at examining the intricacies of artistic process. She is acutely attuned to the twin pulls of disclosure and privacy. ‘‘You started writing memoirs before our culture got as confessional as it’s become, before the word ‘oversharing’ was coined,’’ Gross said to the writer Mary Karr last month. ‘‘So has that affected your standards of what is meant to be written about and what is meant to maintain silence about?’’ (‘‘That’s such a smart question,’’ Karr responded. ‘‘Damn it, now I’m going to have to think.’’) [more inside]
posted by Frayed Knot on Oct 25, 2015 - 51 comments

The Saint of Dry Creek

Patrick Haggerty was a teenager in rural Dry Creek, Washington, in the late 1950s. He remembers the day he first had a conversation with his father about being gay. [more inside]
posted by nadawi on Oct 12, 2015 - 8 comments

#15Girls: 15yr old girls seeking to take control and change their fate

Refuse to share a pencil, reject a boy, say no to your imprisoned dad — all of these can get a teen girl killed in El Salvador's gang war - "Aby, whose best friend disappeared, is still staying at home. Her latest aspiration is to be the director of NASA." Warning: Some of the depictions and images in this story are graphic. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Oct 9, 2015 - 18 comments

Visionary of the Year

Why Iraq Needs Music: Zuhal Sultan On Starting The Iraqi Youth Orchestra - "You know, we all need our basic needs — we need food, we need shelter and we need education — but we also need to be human."
posted by kliuless on Oct 8, 2015 - 1 comment

Stereotype Threat, Imposter Syndrome and Stereotype Tax

How Poker Player Annie Duke Used Gender Stereotypes To Win Matches - "By the time she got to that championship game 10 years later, she had also figured out a way to make people pay, quite literally, for the stereotypes they had about her." (previously)
posted by kliuless on Oct 7, 2015 - 66 comments

"Would you? Could you? In a car?" "No, I do not care for that Renoir"

NPR: 3 Questions With The Guy Who Hates Renoir
posted by schmod on Oct 6, 2015 - 138 comments

Ten years ago, over three hundred men, women and children disappeared.

In a new podcast from APR, host Lia Haddock investigates the disappearance of over 300 men, women and children from the research community of Limetown, TN. What makes the Limetown tragedy unique, what makes it worth a continuing discussion, in spite of the collective moving on, is the complete lack of context. In the ten years since, no one group or individual has taken responsibility. No explanations have been uncovered or given with any credibility and, most tragically, no survivors have been found. [more inside]
posted by thsmchnekllsfascists on Sep 25, 2015 - 55 comments

First Listen: Cast Recording , 'Hamilton'

"This is musical theater made by someone who knows rap to be all our cultural lingua franca, whose sense of humor is legible to people like us. It is songwriting done within rap's regulations and limitations. It's a work of historical fiction that honors the sentiments of rap, a play off collective memory that feels overwhelming personal." NPR is now streaming the Cast Recording of the hit broadway play Hamilton (previously).
posted by DynamiteToast on Sep 21, 2015 - 182 comments

Because we're young and we're reckless; Parting is such sweet sorrow.

Famed Shakespearean actor Sir Patrick Stewart recently appeared on NPR to perform a dramatic rendition of T. A. Swift's classic work, Blank Space.
posted by schmod on Sep 16, 2015 - 19 comments

One doesnt build a safety net for a race of predators. One builds a cage

In his latest essay for The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates (previously) examines "The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration." [more inside]
posted by DynamiteToast on Sep 14, 2015 - 37 comments

"We" aren't on the travel soccer team."

How Schools Are Handling An 'Overparenting' Crisis via NPR
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 6, 2015 - 128 comments

Cue the Foreigner song...

NPR flagstation WNYC's data team is on a quest for the longest possible NYC subway ride. And they suckered Jody Avirgan (538/AskRoulette/UltimateFrisbee) into riding all 11+ hours of it. He's live tweeting the experience, and will also be on WNYC's Brian Lehrer show (which he used to produce) tomorrow to talk about it. Got a question about the NYC subway? Go ahead and tweet him!
posted by ericbop on Sep 3, 2015 - 8 comments

White God

How did they get those dogs to do that? "Hundreds of dogs rise up against their oppressors in this visually stunning, one-metaphor-fits-all Hungarian drama... a film featuring 274 dogs, no CGI, and a pair of canine protagonists who consistently out-emote their human co-stars."
posted by kliuless on Aug 9, 2015 - 32 comments

Kim Konquers NPR. NPR Unhappy.

NPR Ombudsman Elizabeth Jensen says her job brings her "one reliable source of joy: the Monday morning email—there's at least one each week—from a listener outraged by whatever bad taste joke Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! has told on its latest episode." But last week's Monday morning email came in droves, because WWDTM's bad taste joke for the weekend of June 13th was having Kim Kardashian West on the show. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Jun 21, 2015 - 318 comments

What's the deep history of birdiness?

Scientists say they have reversed a bit of bird evolution in the lab and re-created a dinosaurlike snout in developing chickens.
posted by curious nu on May 13, 2015 - 28 comments

Holly Herndon

Holly Herndon "takes technology, including the Internet, as a starting point rather than a stumbling block. Where some would discount online culture as a distraction—or, worse, false consciousness—for Herndon, it's just a place we all call home. As such, it works its way directly into her music, both as subject and content. Featured on her forthcoming album Platform, the uneasy single "Home", which she calls "a love song for prying eyes," is dedicated to the NSA; "Chorus", meanwhile, utilizes a software program that eavesdrops on her browser and folds its audio into a shuddering percussive thrum." The whole album is available to stream here. [more inside]
posted by dng on May 11, 2015 - 5 comments

Getting What You Paid For

The hidden FM radio inside your pocket -- and why you can't use it. [more inside]
posted by flatluigi on Apr 17, 2015 - 105 comments

Who the Hell Is Stromae?

"All over SXSW, kiosks were plastered with posters that posed a provocative question: "Who the hell is Stromae?" It's a question you wouldn't ask in many places outside North America. " NPR's SXSW showcase at Stubb's BBQ attempted to answer the question for an American audience who aren't necessarily too familiar with the superstar Belgian musician/rapper/fashion designer. [more inside]
posted by yasaman on Mar 27, 2015 - 20 comments

"Spirit of my silence I can hear you / But I’m afraid to be near you"

Sufjan Stevens's new album Carrie and Lowell can be streamed in its entirety at NPR and The Guardian. Four (very) early reviews. Previously
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 23, 2015 - 35 comments

Bending in delightful and vulgar ways

A Girl, A Shoe, A Prince: The Endlessly Evolving Cinderella - Linda Holmes, NPR's Monkey See:
"The idea that animates the classic Cinderella is that the prince would not be free to consider Cinderella a desirable mate if he first saw her as she is, but he can meet her under false pretenses and fall in love with her. And, most importantly, once achieved, that love will be durable enough to survive her reversion to her real identity. Getting him to literally recognize her — getting him to look at a woman in rags and realize she's the woman he wants to marry — seems to function as sort of a stand-in for him proving that he can overlook her low status and choose her as a partner. Whether that's more a fantasy of romantic love or a fantasy of economic security, power and rescue from a lifetime of washing floors may depend on who's telling it and who's hearing it and when."
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 15, 2015 - 28 comments

A New Hope For Radio

The extended NPR produced adaptation of 'A New Hope' for your listening pleasure. [more inside]
posted by bq on Mar 9, 2015 - 13 comments

Spinal Zap

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nursing assistants suffered back and other musculoskeletal injuries more than any other occupation in 2013. NPR's Daniel Zwerdling investigated the root cause for many of these injuries: Lifting and moving patients. [more inside]
posted by Gelatin on Feb 12, 2015 - 12 comments

RIP Richard Sher

Richard Sher, host of NPR radio game show Says You!, has died at 66. [more inside]
posted by starvingartist on Feb 10, 2015 - 28 comments

Vocal Color in Public Radio: "authentically black, but not too black"

This summer during the Transom Traveling Workshop on Catalina workshop, I produced my first public radio piece. While writing my script, I was suddenly gripped with a deep fear about my ability to narrate my piece. As I read the script back to myself while editing, I realized that as I was speaking aloud I was also imagining someone else’s voice saying my piece. The voice I was hearing and gradually beginning to imitate was something in between the voice of Roman Mars and Sarah Koenig. Those two very different voices have many complex and wonderful qualities. They also sound like white people. My natural voice — the voice that I most use when I am most comfortable — doesn’t sound like that.
On the sound of public media, on the air and in the podcast world, from Chenjerai Kumanyika, communications professor and hip-hop artist. (via NPR) See also: All Things Considerate, How NPR makes Tavis Smiley sound like Linda Wertheimer.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 30, 2015 - 33 comments

The blind tyranny of low expectations

Daniel Kish is blind. He navigates the world without a cane; he climbs trees; he even rides a bicycle. NPR's new show/podcast Invisibiilia took over This American Life for the episode Batman, which explores how, perhaps, it is society's expectations about blindness which limits their ability to see. Transcript is available, but listening is the best way to really get the full impact. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Jan 15, 2015 - 15 comments

"It’s hard to stay away from religion when you mess with acid."

Robert Stone, Novelist of the Vietnam Era and Beyond, Dies at 77 [New York Times]
"Robert Stone, who wrote ambitious, award-winning novels about errant Americans in dangerous circumstances or on existential quests — or both — as commentary on an unruly, wayward nation in the Vietnam era and beyond, died on Saturday at his home in Key West, Fla. He was 77.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 12, 2015 - 17 comments

"discard anything that doesn’t spark joy"

De-cluttering your house with love: "Marie Kondo has built a huge following in her native Japan with her “KonMari” method of organizing and de-cluttering. Clients perform a sort of tidying-up festival: time set aside specifically to go through belongings. Each object is picked up and held, and the client needs to decide if it inspires joy. If it doesn’t, it needs to go." [more inside]
posted by flex on Jan 11, 2015 - 143 comments

The Secret History Of Thoughts

Locked-In Man - "Martin Pistorius spent more than a decade unable to move or communicate, fearing he would be alone, trapped, forever. NPR's new show Invisibilia tells how his mind helped him create a new life."
posted by kliuless on Jan 11, 2015 - 21 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 9