8 posts tagged with ossuary.
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Digging and living below Naples: buried history of Bourbon Tunnel

An aqueduct, an escape route, an air raid shelter, and an impound lot. Naples Bourbon Tunnel descends 30 meters into the bowels of Monte Echia and travels through 500 years of Neapolitan history. But since the 1970s, these tunnels were forgotten, until local geologists Gianluca Minin and Enzo De Luzio were told about them by a man who had sheltered in them during World War II. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 18, 2016 - 6 comments

Empire de la Mort: honoring the dead around the world

"Do you ever marvel at how there is not a single part of the planet that has not been died upon?" Dr. Paul Koudounaris probably has, given his interest in regional traditions regarding death and ways of honoring (and living with) the dead, with a focus on charnel houses and ossuaries. He has a website titled Empire de la Mort, "being an online resource for charnel houses and burial catacombs," and includes a section on skeletal reliquaries and individual mummies and other miscellaneous sites. His website is a bit dated in design, if not content, and he also posts on Facebook as Empire of Death and on Instagram as hexenkult. (Paul Koudounaris, previously)
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 8, 2016 - 10 comments

The Hodge-Podge Transformer

They told me this was the Transformer. The Hodge-Podge Transformer, en route to the Ossuary. I don't understand what any of that means. I wish I could go to the Ossuary. The place of bones. That sounds simple and quiet, unlike this terrible place. [more inside]
posted by smcg on Jan 2, 2014 - 5 comments

"It shows how drastically our conception of dealing with the dead changed at that point."

I understand your great grandfather was a grave robber?
My family is Greek and they lived in Alexandria back when it was a Greek town. At that point there was a trade in mummy dust, which they called mummia, which was thought to be a cure all. Louis XIV actually used to carry mummia in a pouch and snort little bits of it. The problem was that by the late 19th century they didn’t have a bunch of old Egyptian mummies to dig up anymore. Instead, when criminals were executed, people would steal their bodies and take them to the middle of the Sahara and cover them in tar. They’d come back a year later, dig them up and sell them to apothecaries, where they’d get ground up. This was a burgeoning trade.
A Q&A with author, photographer, and ossuary expert Paul Koudounaris.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 30, 2012 - 17 comments

Her Skull has Roses, His Have Ivy

Hallstatt, Austria, besides being idylic, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is historically fascinating: A Bronze Age cultural center, with a 2,500-year-old salt mine (the world's first); beautiful ice caves; and a Catholic cemetery so small that the dead were regularly disinterred after a time, their skulls painstakingly identified and decorated and stacked in an ossuary.
posted by bigskyguy on Aug 28, 2007 - 5 comments

Ankle bone's connected to the doorknob.

"An ossuary is a chest, building, well or site made to serve as the final resting place of human skeletal remains." via Wikipedia.
The one in the Czech Republic town of Sedlec takes the ossuary and turns it into a thing of bony beauty.
posted by DeepFriedTwinkies on Jul 12, 2005 - 25 comments

Ossuary was genuine, inscription was faked

Ossuary was genuine, inscription was faked Lots of excitement when this ossuary with inscription found and thought to be a direct link back to Jesus...alas, not what it seemed.
posted by Postroad on Nov 6, 2002 - 30 comments

The Ossuary in Sedlec

The Ossuary in Sedlec in the Czech Republic is a chapel, built around 1511, decorated in 1870 by a local woodcutter. His material? Human bones.
posted by fidelity on Apr 19, 2002 - 13 comments

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