436 posts tagged with painting.
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Wegman, Flo and Wendell

Although best known for iconic photographs of his Weimaraner dogs, artist William Wegman is also a painter. While Wegman's combined the two before, recently painting atop commercial travel postcards, he's just published Flo & Wendell, a children's storybook illustrated by dog photos painted over to tell a whimsical tale. Images and review (LA Times); video (YouTube).
posted by DarlingBri on Oct 5, 2013 - 2 comments

Minimalist Breaking Bad Posters

Francesco Francavilla is an artist who has been producing minimalist posters for each of the last 8 episodes of Breaking Bad.
posted by reenum on Sep 23, 2013 - 9 comments

The wow factor.

In the aftermath of one of the strangest political scandals ever to plague the mayor of a major North American city, Rob Ford oversees the unveiling of a high-profile portrait of himself by a sitting councilor, made at the request of Ford's mother. The artist describes the piece as complex, but a lot remains unsaid regarding the weight Ford's personality carries into the realm of portrait.
posted by 256 on Sep 19, 2013 - 61 comments

It's not too often that we come across photos that look like paintings.

10 Fascinating Photos That Look Unbelievably Like Paintings.
posted by The Girl Who Ate Boston on Sep 16, 2013 - 40 comments

Secret Fore-Edge Paintings Revealed in Early 19th Century Books

"A few days ago Colleen Theisen who helps with outreach and instruction at the Special Collections & University Archives at the University of Iowa shared an amazing gif she made that demonstrates something called fore-edge painting on the edge of a 1837 book called Autumn by Robert Mudie. Fore-edge painting, which is believed to date back as early as the 1650s, is a way of hiding a painting on the edge of a book so that it can only be seen when the pages are fanned out. There are even books that have double fore-edge paintings, where a different image can be seen by flipping the book over and fanning the pages in the opposite direction. When I realized the book Theisen shared was only one of a series about the seasons, I got in touch and she agreed to photograph the other three so we could share them with you here."
posted by SpacemanStix on Sep 2, 2013 - 23 comments

Maybe we can make him another ear...

You know how Van Gogh liked to really slather paint on and his paintings were rather 3D but you couldn't touch them but really wanted to? Now you can. Fujifilm has created a process called Reliefography, which creates 3D-printed versions of paintings called Relievos. They are exclusive to the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam for three years, but will move on to other instituions after that time. They can only produce three copies a day, but "the torn labels and hand written notes on the back of a canvas are perfectly recreated". [more inside]
posted by sio42 on Aug 28, 2013 - 29 comments

Something split and new

Njideka Akunyili's acrylic painting over photocopies combines figurative, domestic scenes with the cacophony of globalism and traditional decorative motifs.
posted by klangklangston on Aug 12, 2013 - 5 comments

"Sometimes he talks about art in his sleep."

The Pixel Painter is a short documentary about Hal Lasko, a 97-year-old artist who paints in Microsoft Paint. [more inside]
posted by oulipian on Jul 23, 2013 - 22 comments

Happy Little Trees

Lorenzo Triburgo has photographed what he calls "Transportraits". He shoots his transgender subjects from a slightly upward-facing angle in order to portray a sense of heroism. Triburgo painted the backgrounds of his portraits himself after learning how from Bob Ross's The Joy of Painting.
posted by deborah on Jul 9, 2013 - 16 comments

Six Months at Sea in the Merchant Marine

Martin Machado's short and serene documentary about his experiences working on a container ship. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Jul 8, 2013 - 19 comments

"an early 1960s self-portrait as a pitchman"

The Fine Art of Resilience: Lessons from Stanley Meltzoff [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 3, 2013 - 1 comment

Shwa Keirstead

Gentleman and Scholars. Paintings of mystical animals by Shwa Keirstead. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 27, 2013 - 1 comment

Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis. A short film retelling of Titian's Diana and Actaeon for The National Gallery, London, by Tell No One. [Possibly NSFW, Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 23, 2013 - 7 comments

Search the memory of The Netherlands

The Memory of the Netherlands is an image library making available the online collections of museums, archives and libraries. The library provides access to images from the collections of more than one hundred institutions and includes photographs, sculptures, paintings, bronzes, pottery, modern art, drawings, stamps, posters and newspaper clippings. In addition there are also video and sound recordings to see and listen to. The Memory of the Netherlands offers an historic overview of images from exceptional collections, organized by subject to provide easy access
Search 833928 objects from 133 collections from 100 institutions.
posted by infini on Jun 22, 2013 - 4 comments

It's like the entire world left Caps Lock on for 180 million years.

What Daleks, xenomorphs and slasher movies tell us about palaeoart. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Jun 17, 2013 - 9 comments

Chromatic Typewriter

American painter Tyree Callahan converted an old typewriter from 1930s into a machine that prints colors instead of letters.
posted by chavenet on Jun 16, 2013 - 23 comments

Art And Education And Tumblr

Art History explained using Gifs (related: The true story of an art history grad student explained via gifs)
posted by The Whelk on Jun 10, 2013 - 12 comments

What Jane Saw

On May 24th, 1813, Jane Austen visited a blockbuster art exhibition--the first major retrospective of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the premier English portraitist of the 18th century. Debuting 200 years to the day later, What Jane Saw is a room-by-room virtual recreation of the exhibition, based on the original catalog of the paintings and contemporary depictions of the building where it was held.
posted by Horace Rumpole on May 27, 2013 - 8 comments

Madon­nas of Sci­ence

The Madon­nas of Sci­ence, plus selected other work (possibly nsfw) by Chris Shaw. [more inside]
posted by homunculus on May 23, 2013 - 6 comments

Watch Modern Artists Use Ancient Techniques

For the past three months, the Art Institute of Chicago has been putting their Launchpad videos, designed to provide more context of museum-goers at the Institutes, on YouTube. The short videos include modern artists recreating art using ancient, medieval, and newer techniques in mosaics, glassblowing, pottery, painting, silversmithing, marquetry, and coin production plus conservation of art. There are also a few videos focusing on individual pieces in the collection.
posted by julen on May 20, 2013 - 7 comments

Little Monsters

Anya Stasenko and Slava Leontiev are Ukranian porcelain artists who create monsters both real and imaginary. The magic is how they're painted-sometimes with shapes, sometimes with organic patterns, sometimes with a scene, and sometimes containing a whole story.
posted by FirstMateKate on May 7, 2013 - 11 comments

One: Singular Sensation

Last summer, the Museum of Modern Art took one of its best-known paintings off the wall, Jackson Pollock's One: Number 31, 1950, so that it could be conserved. They've been blogging about the process of restoring this dense, multi-layered work, including closeup photos that reveal an earlier restoration in the mid-60s before it came to MOMA.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Apr 21, 2013 - 26 comments

Dali's Demon Bride

That Salvador Dali fell victim to his Russian wife Gala's lust for domination and very young men is no longer a matter of conjecture....some terrifying new facts, which reveal in more detail and depth than ever before how and why this quintessential Surrealist—the master of the soft watches—allowed himself to be destroyed by one of the nastiest wives a major modern artist ever saddled himself with. Art critic John Richardson examines Dali's life with Gala [PDF, should be SFW]. This article originally appeared in Vanity Fair in 1998.A slightly edited version of the article illustrated with different photos [NSFW]. [via Nag On The Lake]
posted by CCBC on Apr 17, 2013 - 47 comments

I said Goddamn!!!

Gorgeous Portraits of Movie Characters & Classic Shots by Massimo Carnevale [slimgur]
posted by cthuljew on Apr 4, 2013 - 41 comments

"Onze helden zijn terug!"

On April 13, the Rijksmuseum will reopen to the public after a renovation and makeover that took five years longer than expected and went tens of millions of dollars over budget. The museum's most famous painting was also one of the last to be restored to its original location: Rembrandt's "The Night Watch". Sponsor ING Bank celebrated with a unique and special flashmob. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Apr 3, 2013 - 30 comments

Because we all need to dream a little

one surrealist a day.
Old and New Surrealist Art with occasional photography and poetry. Complete with search function.
As an extra a sampling of French surrealist poetry in translation. There are also some short films on Vimeo.
posted by adamvasco on Mar 28, 2013 - 6 comments

Flash Friday: Second Empire Artistic Demimonde Edition

In the new game Avant-Garde, you play an up-and-coming artist in 19th century Paris, a contemporary of Manet and Bouguereau. Carve and sell allegorical statue groups! Get snubbed by Napoleon III! Subsidize Gustave Courbet's drinking! Compose and promulgate your own aesthetic manifesto!
posted by Iridic on Mar 8, 2013 - 56 comments

Heinrich Berann, the father of the modern cartographic panorama

Heinrich Caesar Berann is known as the father of the modern cartographic panorama and is also credited as the most prolific panorama artist ever. His style and work could be credited with the lasting appeal of stylized panoramic maps that often feature exaggerated or distorted features as the preferred map type for ski resorts and trails (PDF) but Berann's true passion was art, as seen in these collections of his paintings and drawings found on the tribute site maintained by his grandson, Matthias Troyer. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 2, 2013 - 6 comments

The King Under The Rock

Hey guys, remember that old show "Fraggle Rock?" And, and you know that recently-released movie The Hobbit? Well, why not combine the two?
posted by JHarris on Mar 2, 2013 - 8 comments

"Pushing a Wall", "Mock Baptismal" and "Stirring Excrements with a Stick"

In 1560, the Flemish Renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder created Children's Games, a painting featuring about 80 contemporary games. Included among the games are "Pushing a Wall", "Mock Baptismal" and "Stirring Excrements with a Stick".
posted by dbarefoot on Mar 1, 2013 - 53 comments

Morris Scott Dollens' Dream of the Stars

Morris Scott Dollens was an active and creative science fiction fan from the earliest days of sci-fi fandom, starting with making the fanzine Science Fiction Collector via hectography at age 16. He went on to illustrate covers for various other fanzines and wrote short stories, but largely left those creative endeavors for technological hobbies and jobs related to photography and recording from the 1950s to 1960s. Following the moon landing in 1969, he began creating small-scale astronomical paintings that he mailed to sci-fi conventions all over the country, where they were part of convention art shows. He also made miniature scenes of space exploration, which he crafted as teasers for a movie, Dream of the Stars, which he sent to magazines and book publishers, but his movie was never made. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 19, 2013 - 2 comments

She looked good coming down those stairs

One hundred years ago today in 1913, an art exhibition opened in New York City that shocked the country, changed our perception of beauty and had a profound effect on artists and collectors. The International Exhibition of Modern Art — which came to be known, simply, as the Armory Show — marked the dawn of Modernism in America.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 19, 2013 - 15 comments

Bush family data breach exposes GWB's artistic chops

The apparent hack of several e-mail accounts has exposed personal photos and sensitive correspondence from members of the Bush family, including both former U.S. presidents, The Smoking Gun has learned. Among this leak are some of George W.'s self-portraits.
posted by porn in the woods on Feb 8, 2013 - 156 comments

Head related to famous vulva found after 144 years

The most famous female pudenda in the world, depicted in Courbet's 1866 painting L'origine du monde (The Origin of the World), which has been drawing crowds at the Orsay Museum since 1995 (and caused recently some Facebook-related controversy), may be soon reunited with the head of their owner, Irish model and muse (for Courbet and Whistler) Joanna Hiffernan. The theory is that the painting originally showed Hifferman's whole body, as in Courbet's Sleep, and was later cut in several pieces, though some art critics already disagree (Most links NSFW).
posted by elgilito on Feb 7, 2013 - 62 comments

The human paperweight

Robert Lenkiewicz was a prolific and prodigiously talented (if unfashionable) painter, a self-styled outsider, and a philanderer rumoured to have slept with more than 3000 women. When he died, the embalmed body of a homeless man named Diogenes was found in a cupboard drawer in his studio. [more inside]
posted by misterbee on Feb 5, 2013 - 19 comments

Evol's tiny world of apartments

Street artist Evol paints little apartment buildings on utility boxes, concrete blocks, park walls, and art installations (completed, but nothing lasts forever). More on his Flickr collection, or you can see highlights on Twisted Sifter.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 31, 2013 - 14 comments

It's A Pity Only Security See Our Graffiti

As happens all over the world regularly, one night a team of artists got together to paint some art on the sides of trains. This group, however, used their naked bodies... and a fire extinguisher. (SLVimeo, NSFW, via Common Folk Collective.)
posted by knile on Dec 22, 2012 - 44 comments

got milk?

Photorealism has been highlighted here on the blue, where 2D work is made to look 3 dimensional. But what about the opposite? Artist Alex Meade's live-model photographs look like paintings. [more inside]
posted by FirstMateKate on Dec 9, 2012 - 16 comments

Happy Screaming Little Trees and Happy Screaming Little Mountain Clouds

“The technique to this painting is to incorporate the sound of screams into the brush strokes.”
Kim Beom’s Yellow Scream (2012).
posted by enfa on Dec 7, 2012 - 12 comments

Harold Lash

Harold Lash is an abstract painter whose works are wild and startlingly vivid. There are repeated themes of flowers and cities and ships and are often obsessively patriotic. I particularly enjoy his painting of Rittenhouse in Philadelphia, where he lives and works, and the colors of Girls Night Out strikes me as well. [WARNING: HUGE IMAGES]
posted by Rory Marinich on Nov 18, 2012 - 9 comments

Go to War. Do Art. (II)

The permanent collection of the (US) National Veterans Art Museum in Chicago contains more than 2,500 pieces of art by 250 artists, all of which can be seen at NVAM Collection Online. The site includes biographical material on the artists who created the work. Featured Artwork. A small selection. (Via. Images at links in this post may be nsfw, and/or disturbing to some viewers.)
posted by zarq on Nov 12, 2012 - 1 comment

"We cannot send 'The Dog' to the museum basement because it was on the apparently nonexisting second floor of the Quinta."

The Black Paintings is the title given to a series of works by Spanish artist Francisco Goya painted directly on the walls of his house from 1819-23. Their provenance has been doubted much like that of The Colossus, which has recently been attributed to Goya's assistant. Either way, the Black Paintings are masterpieces and have pride of place in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, which has put them all online in high resolution (you can save images to your computer in high resolution). [Goya previously]
posted by Kattullus on Nov 8, 2012 - 9 comments

A Very Still Life

The paintings are the work of none other than Jack Kevorkian, the late Armenian-American pathologist, philosopher, assisted suicide advocate, and convicted felon otherwise known as Dr. Death. They are strikingly well executed. Unlike the works of other improbable painters — Adolf Hitler’s multicolored bouquets and elegant nudes or Winston Churchill’s pastoral sceneries — Kevorkian’s canvases are markedly obvious and gruesomely, almost risibly, literal. And the man in the coma, the man on fire, and the man with the brains by his side look a lot like the auteur himself.
posted by latkes on Nov 1, 2012 - 40 comments

"First freedom and then Glory - when that fails, Wealth, vice, corruption - barbarism at last"

Savagery - Arcadia - Consummation - Destruction - Desolation. The five stages of The Course of Empire, a fascinating quintet of paintings by 19th century artist and Hudson River School pioneer Thomas Cole. In it, an imaginary settlement by the sea becomes the stage for all the dreams and nightmares of civilized life, a rural woodland grown in time into a glorious metropolis... only to be ransacked by corruption, war, and a terrible storm, at last reduced to a forgotten ruin. At times deceptively simple, each landscape teems with references to cultural and philosophical markers that dominated the era's debate about the future of America. Interactive analysis of the series on a zoomable canvas is available via the excellent Explore Thomas Cole project, which also offers a guided tour and complete gallery of the dozens of other richly detailed and beautifully luminous works by this master of American landscape art.
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 29, 2012 - 23 comments

Giger's Necronomicon

Giger's Necronomicon (yt) (nsfw) - a 1976 documentary about H.R. Giger with music by Joel Vandroogenbroeck of the Brainticket.
posted by Artw on Oct 24, 2012 - 7 comments

Damn, I wish I thought of that.

The Jealous Curator is 'a collection of art that inspires & depresses' its proprietor, who has been updating the site almost daily since February 2009 with series of paintings, sculpture and mixed media, furniture, and always with light-hearted commentary about what's posted.
posted by shakespeherian on Oct 10, 2012 - 8 comments

John Singer Sargent and the Boston Public Library

In 1890, the painter John Singer Sargent--best known for portraits like Madame X and The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit--accepted a commission to execute a large-scale mural cycle in the Boston Public Library, The Triumph of Religion. His last completed mural was installed in 1919, but the cycle remained unfinished. After years of decay, the cycle has undergone extensive conservation work, and the Library now has a detailed site devoted to Sargent Hall. [more inside]
posted by thomas j wise on Sep 28, 2012 - 20 comments

"A love for the magic of creation"

Adam Doyle paints "beautiful gestural portraits of birds," according to the art blog Colossal. His other work includes book covers, paintings and illustrations aimed at children, and contributions to the 52 Shades of Greed card deck (4 of clubs, 5 & 6 of hearts, and 7 of spades).
posted by catlet on Sep 24, 2012 - 4 comments

Makers of Ruins

Once upon a time, there was a wizard who knew what Heaven and Hell looked like.
On Joseph Michael Gandy (1771 – 1843), the architect's assistant who painted palaces that never were and ruins that had yet to be. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Sep 18, 2012 - 14 comments

" the flawed, bonkers and brilliant" Pre-Raphaelites

A new exhibit on the sometimes maligned, but often adored, Pre-Raphaelite painters is at the Tate Britain. "You get the impression, in this exhibition, that the Pre-Raphaelites had a good time because they were the only Victorian men who recognised women as sexual beings" previously
posted by Isadorady on Sep 11, 2012 - 41 comments

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