458 posts tagged with painting.
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The King Under The Rock

Hey guys, remember that old show "Fraggle Rock?" And, and you know that recently-released movie The Hobbit? Well, why not combine the two?
posted by JHarris on Mar 2, 2013 - 8 comments

"Pushing a Wall", "Mock Baptismal" and "Stirring Excrements with a Stick"

In 1560, the Flemish Renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder created Children's Games, a painting featuring about 80 contemporary games. Included among the games are "Pushing a Wall", "Mock Baptismal" and "Stirring Excrements with a Stick".
posted by dbarefoot on Mar 1, 2013 - 53 comments

Morris Scott Dollens' Dream of the Stars

Morris Scott Dollens was an active and creative science fiction fan from the earliest days of sci-fi fandom, starting with making the fanzine Science Fiction Collector via hectography at age 16. He went on to illustrate covers for various other fanzines and wrote short stories, but largely left those creative endeavors for technological hobbies and jobs related to photography and recording from the 1950s to 1960s. Following the moon landing in 1969, he began creating small-scale astronomical paintings that he mailed to sci-fi conventions all over the country, where they were part of convention art shows. He also made miniature scenes of space exploration, which he crafted as teasers for a movie, Dream of the Stars, which he sent to magazines and book publishers, but his movie was never made. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 19, 2013 - 2 comments

She looked good coming down those stairs

One hundred years ago today in 1913, an art exhibition opened in New York City that shocked the country, changed our perception of beauty and had a profound effect on artists and collectors. The International Exhibition of Modern Art — which came to be known, simply, as the Armory Show — marked the dawn of Modernism in America.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Feb 19, 2013 - 15 comments

Bush family data breach exposes GWB's artistic chops

The apparent hack of several e-mail accounts has exposed personal photos and sensitive correspondence from members of the Bush family, including both former U.S. presidents, The Smoking Gun has learned. Among this leak are some of George W.'s self-portraits.
posted by porn in the woods on Feb 8, 2013 - 156 comments

Head related to famous vulva found after 144 years

The most famous female pudenda in the world, depicted in Courbet's 1866 painting L'origine du monde (The Origin of the World), which has been drawing crowds at the Orsay Museum since 1995 (and caused recently some Facebook-related controversy), may be soon reunited with the head of their owner, Irish model and muse (for Courbet and Whistler) Joanna Hiffernan. The theory is that the painting originally showed Hifferman's whole body, as in Courbet's Sleep, and was later cut in several pieces, though some art critics already disagree (Most links NSFW).
posted by elgilito on Feb 7, 2013 - 62 comments

The human paperweight

Robert Lenkiewicz was a prolific and prodigiously talented (if unfashionable) painter, a self-styled outsider, and a philanderer rumoured to have slept with more than 3000 women. When he died, the embalmed body of a homeless man named Diogenes was found in a cupboard drawer in his studio. [more inside]
posted by misterbee on Feb 5, 2013 - 19 comments

Evol's tiny world of apartments

Street artist Evol paints little apartment buildings on utility boxes, concrete blocks, park walls, and art installations (completed, but nothing lasts forever). More on his Flickr collection, or you can see highlights on Twisted Sifter.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 31, 2013 - 14 comments

It's A Pity Only Security See Our Graffiti

As happens all over the world regularly, one night a team of artists got together to paint some art on the sides of trains. This group, however, used their naked bodies... and a fire extinguisher. (SLVimeo, NSFW, via Common Folk Collective.)
posted by knile on Dec 22, 2012 - 44 comments

got milk?

Photorealism has been highlighted here on the blue, where 2D work is made to look 3 dimensional. But what about the opposite? Artist Alex Meade's live-model photographs look like paintings. [more inside]
posted by FirstMateKate on Dec 9, 2012 - 16 comments

Happy Screaming Little Trees and Happy Screaming Little Mountain Clouds

“The technique to this painting is to incorporate the sound of screams into the brush strokes.”
Kim Beom’s Yellow Scream (2012).
posted by enfa on Dec 7, 2012 - 12 comments

Harold Lash

Harold Lash is an abstract painter whose works are wild and startlingly vivid. There are repeated themes of flowers and cities and ships and are often obsessively patriotic. I particularly enjoy his painting of Rittenhouse in Philadelphia, where he lives and works, and the colors of Girls Night Out strikes me as well. [WARNING: HUGE IMAGES]
posted by Rory Marinich on Nov 18, 2012 - 9 comments

Go to War. Do Art. (II)

The permanent collection of the (US) National Veterans Art Museum in Chicago contains more than 2,500 pieces of art by 250 artists, all of which can be seen at NVAM Collection Online. The site includes biographical material on the artists who created the work. Featured Artwork. A small selection. (Via. Images at links in this post may be nsfw, and/or disturbing to some viewers.)
posted by zarq on Nov 12, 2012 - 1 comment

"We cannot send 'The Dog' to the museum basement because it was on the apparently nonexisting second floor of the Quinta."

The Black Paintings is the title given to a series of works by Spanish artist Francisco Goya painted directly on the walls of his house from 1819-23. Their provenance has been doubted much like that of The Colossus, which has recently been attributed to Goya's assistant. Either way, the Black Paintings are masterpieces and have pride of place in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, which has put them all online in high resolution (you can save images to your computer in high resolution). [Goya previously]
posted by Kattullus on Nov 8, 2012 - 9 comments

A Very Still Life

The paintings are the work of none other than Jack Kevorkian, the late Armenian-American pathologist, philosopher, assisted suicide advocate, and convicted felon otherwise known as Dr. Death. They are strikingly well executed. Unlike the works of other improbable painters — Adolf Hitler’s multicolored bouquets and elegant nudes or Winston Churchill’s pastoral sceneries — Kevorkian’s canvases are markedly obvious and gruesomely, almost risibly, literal. And the man in the coma, the man on fire, and the man with the brains by his side look a lot like the auteur himself.
posted by latkes on Nov 1, 2012 - 40 comments

"First freedom and then Glory - when that fails, Wealth, vice, corruption - barbarism at last"

Savagery - Arcadia - Consummation - Destruction - Desolation. The five stages of The Course of Empire, a fascinating quintet of paintings by 19th century artist and Hudson River School pioneer Thomas Cole. In it, an imaginary settlement by the sea becomes the stage for all the dreams and nightmares of civilized life, a rural woodland grown in time into a glorious metropolis... only to be ransacked by corruption, war, and a terrible storm, at last reduced to a forgotten ruin. At times deceptively simple, each landscape teems with references to cultural and philosophical markers that dominated the era's debate about the future of America. Interactive analysis of the series on a zoomable canvas is available via the excellent Explore Thomas Cole project, which also offers a guided tour and complete gallery of the dozens of other richly detailed and beautifully luminous works by this master of American landscape art.
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 29, 2012 - 23 comments

Giger's Necronomicon

Giger's Necronomicon (yt) (nsfw) - a 1976 documentary about H.R. Giger with music by Joel Vandroogenbroeck of the Brainticket.
posted by Artw on Oct 24, 2012 - 7 comments

Damn, I wish I thought of that.

The Jealous Curator is 'a collection of art that inspires & depresses' its proprietor, who has been updating the site almost daily since February 2009 with series of paintings, sculpture and mixed media, furniture, and always with light-hearted commentary about what's posted.
posted by shakespeherian on Oct 10, 2012 - 8 comments

John Singer Sargent and the Boston Public Library

In 1890, the painter John Singer Sargent--best known for portraits like Madame X and The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit--accepted a commission to execute a large-scale mural cycle in the Boston Public Library, The Triumph of Religion. His last completed mural was installed in 1919, but the cycle remained unfinished. After years of decay, the cycle has undergone extensive conservation work, and the Library now has a detailed site devoted to Sargent Hall. [more inside]
posted by thomas j wise on Sep 28, 2012 - 20 comments

"A love for the magic of creation"

Adam Doyle paints "beautiful gestural portraits of birds," according to the art blog Colossal. His other work includes book covers, paintings and illustrations aimed at children, and contributions to the 52 Shades of Greed card deck (4 of clubs, 5 & 6 of hearts, and 7 of spades).
posted by catlet on Sep 24, 2012 - 4 comments

Makers of Ruins

Once upon a time, there was a wizard who knew what Heaven and Hell looked like.
On Joseph Michael Gandy (1771 – 1843), the architect's assistant who painted palaces that never were and ruins that had yet to be. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Sep 18, 2012 - 14 comments

" the flawed, bonkers and brilliant" Pre-Raphaelites

A new exhibit on the sometimes maligned, but often adored, Pre-Raphaelite painters is at the Tate Britain. "You get the impression, in this exhibition, that the Pre-Raphaelites had a good time because they were the only Victorian men who recognised women as sexual beings" previously
posted by Isadorady on Sep 11, 2012 - 41 comments

Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin

By general consent, Jean-Siméon Chardin was one of the supreme artists of the eighteenth century and probably the greatest master of still life in the history of painting. - Robert Hughes [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Sep 1, 2012 - 7 comments

“I paint pictures which do not exist and which I would like to see.”

Argentine born sometime Surrealist artist Leonor Fini was a Cat lover, extraordinaire.
She depicted women exploring their own identity at a time when female identity both physically and mentally was being defined by men, once declaring:
A woman should live with two men; one more a lover and the other more a friend.
Photographed by many; showing her dressed in Cat costume or sitting with one of her numerous cats; and her art frequently figured them somewhere or other.
More photographs of her and a video. Like the rest of her work some are NSFW and some feature cats. A brief biography.
posted by adamvasco on Aug 31, 2012 - 7 comments

Don't try this at home

Art restoration is probably best left to the professionals, as vividly demonstrated by an elderly Spanish woman's unauthorized attempt to repair a damaged fresco, “Ecce Homo,” by painter Elias Garcia Martinez. The results speak for themselves.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 22, 2012 - 111 comments

Johannes Vermeer's "Woman Holding A Balance"

Johannes Vermeer's "Woman Holding A Balance" [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Aug 17, 2012 - 15 comments

The Physics of physicality

WIRED has been running a fascinating series: Olympic Physics: Can Runners Benefit From Drafting?, Scoring the Decathlon, New [Swimming] Platform Is No Chip Off The Old Block [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 13, 2012 - 16 comments

Makes No Difference Who You Are

Disasterland [NSFW cartoons] is Mexican artist Rodolfo Loaiza's tribute to pop culture, fashion, animation, horror films and the undeniable attraction of celebrity, often in the form of twisted Disney juxtapositions. More at the artist's Flickr.
posted by laconic skeuomorph on Jul 31, 2012 - 16 comments

Vertical Diamond in the Rough

Abstract artist Ilya Bolotowsky is represented in quite a few museums. But a painting of his, Vertical Diamond, appeared in a more unusual location,, was snapped up for bargain price of $9.99 and was nearly recycled into pet paintings. A label on the back of the painting from the Weatherspoon Art Museum led the museum's registrars to dig into archived files and track some of the painting's history before it found itself in the bargain bin.
posted by PussKillian on Jul 27, 2012 - 37 comments

The Ju-Ju Magic of the Miners of Afosu

The Ju-Ju Magic of the Miners of Afosu. Photos and paintings from Ghana by Ben Zawalich.
posted by homunculus on Jul 26, 2012 - 2 comments

Monster Brains

Monster Brains is a blog about paintings and drawings of monsters. My favourite post on the site showcased Masters Of The Universe Paintings By Earl Norem, William George and Esteban Maroto.
posted by chunking express on Jul 17, 2012 - 7 comments

Sorry

I Can't Apologize Enough is an ongoing series of small mixed media drawings by David Fullarton. [more inside]
posted by xod on Jun 26, 2012 - 12 comments

(decisions made easier in this hideous homemade christmas sweater)

In the Studio: The Process of a Painting. Mark Schoening gives New American Paintings a look into his months-long process on a new painting. More on Shoening's Tumblr and Vimeo.
posted by shakespeherian on Jun 20, 2012 - 1 comment

I like the one on velvet.

Let's add some monsters to thrift store paintings! Artists Chris McMahon and Thryza Segal decided to inject a little fun into these discarded works and give them a second life by adding monsters to the scenic landscapes.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Apr 15, 2012 - 40 comments

The Dying of the Light

Thomas Kinkade, the "Painter of Light" and one of the most popular artists in America, died suddenly Friday at his Los Gatos home. He was 54. [more inside]
posted by darkstar on Apr 6, 2012 - 162 comments

Watching paint dry just got interesting

Phyllis Toburen combines painting and macro-photography to create lovely sculptural enamel pieces. [more inside]
posted by quin on Apr 4, 2012 - 2 comments

All my own work

'I'd like 11 and a half tons of resin, please': the artisans behind the artists
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Apr 1, 2012 - 32 comments

Closer I Am to Van Eyck

Closer to Van Eyck is an ultra-high-resolution look at one of the greatest masterpieces of Flemish painting, the Ghent Altarpiece (previously) an astounding 100 billion pixels in size. Stolen, with permission, from peacay's Twitter stream.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Feb 26, 2012 - 16 comments

Dr. Sketchy au Centre Pompidou

(some links may be NSFW) Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School Paris branch recently took to the Centre Pompidou for a session of drawing and modernist art. Models were inspired by several paintings in the gallery, such as Otto Dix's Portrait de la journaliste Sylvia Von Harden (1926), Fernand Léger'sComposition with Two Parrots (1939), Man Ray's Ingre's Violin (1924), Robert Delaunay, Erté, and Pablo Picasso. Here are photos of the session as well as some of the sketches.
posted by shakespeherian on Feb 20, 2012 - 7 comments

"It was as if he knew he was going to a very dark place and he knew he couldn't do anything about it,"

Artistic decline through Alzheimer's - William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 1995 yet he continued drawing. His last self portraits painted between 1995 and 2001 tell a unique tale of an implacable disease encroaching on to his mind and senses. [more inside]
posted by quin on Feb 6, 2012 - 39 comments

New masters

SF versions of famous artworks
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 5, 2012 - 31 comments

The Lucas Cranach Art Archive

"The Cranach Digital Archive is an interdisciplinary collaborative research resource, providing access to art historical, technical and conservation information on paintings by Lucas Cranach (c.1472 - 1553) and his workshop. The repository presently provides information on more than 400 paintings including c.5000 images and documents from 19 partner institutions."
posted by peacay on Jan 18, 2012 - 4 comments

Figure Drawing Training Tool

Gesture drawing from home: a convenient tool for practising figure drawing
posted by rollick on Jan 17, 2012 - 16 comments

The Speedy Bob Ross!

If you like Bob Ross and his happy trees, you will enjoy Fabian Gaete Maureira. This Chilean street artist produces scenes reminiscent of that of Bob Ross and "The Joy of Painting." But he does it in three minutes! And just for the heck of it, here are some memorable videos of Bob Ross painting: Mountains Evergreen Tree Clouds
posted by zizzle on Jan 16, 2012 - 16 comments

Goldfish Salvation

Riusuke Fukahori uses images painted on layers of resin to create mind-blowing three dimensional pieces that look amazingly real. [video]
posted by quin on Jan 10, 2012 - 10 comments

An Arrow in the Androgyne

Emerging surrealist artist Margo Selski, known for her Modern Subcultures-and-Flemish fusion inspired theatrical portraiture, has opened a new exhibit that prominently features and celebrates her shy 12-year old son Theo, who attended the opening gala in a beautiful red velvet gown, pearls, and black lace opera gloves. [more inside]
posted by Chipmazing on Jan 7, 2012 - 20 comments

Pop Surrealist Intervention Art

"These pictures began as a family tradition of giving each other 'gag gifts' for Christmas; I took cheap oils from a local flea market and embellished them with absurdities." (Possibly NSFW: nude painting in second link, second page of third link.)
posted by griphus on Jan 6, 2012 - 15 comments

"I have always been concerned with painting that simultaneously insists on a flat surface and then denies it."

"I had no desire to copy Pollock. I didn’t want to take a stick and dip it in a can of enamel. I needed something more liquid, watery, thinner. All my life, I have been drawn to water and translucency. I love the water; I love to swim, to watch changing seascapes. One of my favorite childhood games was to fill a sink with water and punt nail polish into to see what happened when the colors burst up the surface, merging into each other as floating, changing shapes." - Helen Frankenthaler
Her paintings looked like watercolors, but were created with oils. To achieve the effect, she heavily diluted her oil paints with turpentine, then dripped them onto an unprimed canvas on the floor, in a brushless technique reminiscent of Jackson Pollock's, called a "soak stain." But where Pollock's paint was often thick and sat on top of the canvas, hers drenched it in color, creating a unique, softer work. Ms. Frankenthaler passed away today, at the age of 83, after a long illness. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 27, 2011 - 35 comments

Giorgio Morandi

Aspirants to the role of painter-as-poet are many. Giorgio Morandi was the real thing. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Dec 22, 2011 - 5 comments

The paintings of Don Van Vliet

Don Van Vliet is self-taught. He neither expects allowances for the amateur’s lack of dexterity nor permits any technical deficiency on his own part to limit his scope. Nobody's understanding or forbearance sets limits to what he does - any more than does the fear of going wrong. The lacerations, transgressions, and awkward moments that he introduces are unpredictable, as is their duration; when he takes the figures that confront him and tugs them out of shape, he simultaneously tugs himself out of shape - and out of his own limitations. - Roberto Ohrt
posted by Trurl on Dec 14, 2011 - 14 comments

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