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Degenerate Art

Franz Sedlacek (1891 – 1945) was an Austrian painter who belonged to the tradition known as "New Objectivity" ("neue Sachlichkeit"), an artistic movement similar to Magical Realism. At the end of the Second World War he "disappeared" as a soldier of the Wehrmacht somewhere in Poland.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 7, 2011 - 4 comments

 

Alberto Giacometti

One afternoon in September 1958, a beautiful, distinguished and mysterious woman arrived at the door of number 46 rue Hippolyte Maindron. This was the Paris studio where Alberto Giacometti had been working since 1926, having arrived in the city four years earlier. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Dec 1, 2011 - 7 comments

John Ruskin's Elements of Drawing

The Elements of Drawing: John Ruskin's Teaching Collection at Oxford digitizes the drawings, engravings, and paintings that John Ruskin collected (and created) for use in teaching drawing. The objects can be viewed separately or in their teaching order and context, with Ruskin's own catalog annotations. The site also suggests how modern art students can put the collection to use, with instructional video and a variety of drawing exercises. Ruskin also assembled another fine art collection for working-class viewers in Sheffield; you can see that collection at the Museum of Sheffield, which also helps sponsor a digital reconstruction of the original museum building, the St. George's Museum.
posted by thomas j wise on Nov 14, 2011 - 5 comments

It's contemprary and it's good and it's in Barcelona

The Museo Europeu de Art Modern in Barcelona presently has an exhibition of contemporary art featuring many catalan and spanish painters and sculpters and is housed in a restaured palacio (click through the "plantas"). MEAM is associated with figurativas en red.
As this is contemporary art, nudes abound and this post is unfortunately NSFW in many places.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 14, 2011 - 1 comment

Brother, can you spare a masterpiece?

Paintings by Leonardo da Vinci are among the rarest and most coveted treasures in the museum world. So how did the National Gallery manage to assemble two thirds of the world's supply for its new show Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan?
posted by Horace Rumpole on Nov 5, 2011 - 25 comments

“We shall have a man in the White House who will feel as responsible for American civilization as he does for American power and prosperity.”

"It was no accident that arts funding was once again brought to national attention with the exhibit Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture. Since the 80s, the enemies of the NEA have not been those with differences of opinion about what art should be supported or how. Instead they oppose any support at all for art of any kind." Hide/Seek, Culture Wars and the History of the NEA (NSFW, art)
posted by The Whelk on Nov 1, 2011 - 115 comments

Makes me want to go hunting for secret art.

A fore-edge painting (previously, but it's been a while) is a painting on the edges of the pages of a book that can only be seen when the pages are fanned out. Marist College has a nice history and introduction and the Boston Public Library has an impressive gallery.
posted by Vibrissa on Oct 25, 2011 - 8 comments

Astronauts who got creative about their experiences

Over 500 people have traveled into outer space. While many have written books about the experience, only a few have used more creative means to express what they saw and felt. Here are a few: [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 9, 2011 - 13 comments

Amy works entirely without a paintbrush.

Amy works entirely without a paintbrush. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Oct 2, 2011 - 55 comments

A landscape of the mind

''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains'' is the greatest surviving masterpiece by Huang Gongwang (黄公望 1269-1354), one of the Four Yuan Masters; considered one of the finest of all Chinese paintings, it served as a model and inspiration for many subsequent literati artists. The scroll suffered fire damage in the early Qing and was divided into two parts. This summer, a special exhibition at the National Palace Museum in Taiwan reunited these two portions of Huang's masterwork for the first time in 360 years.
posted by Abiezer on Oct 1, 2011 - 18 comments

'The most excellent painter that England hath yet bred'

Britain's finest Baroque portraitist, on a par with Frans Hals, has been all but forgotten, but a new BBC documentary and associated website seek to address that. William Dobson, 1611-46, was painter to Charles I's court during the English Civil War, and the turmoil of the period meant that much of his biography and even the names of the subjects of his portraits were lost. But many of his portraits have survived, and they're astonishing. [more inside]
posted by rory on Oct 1, 2011 - 18 comments

'Flesh was the reason oil paint was invented'

There is currently a far reaching retrospective at the MOMA in New York on painter Willem de Kooning, that most deeply European of the Abstract Expressionists who drew the international art world's attention to New York back in the post war years. He's most famous as the creator of one of the few paintings of the 20th century that stills retains the ability to shock. But, as this quite interesting MOMA website shows, there was a lot more to his enterprise than most people realize. My first post here by the way.
posted by Phlegmco(tm) on Sep 28, 2011 - 19 comments

8-Bit Animal Paintings

"Menagerie" is a series of 10 polygonal animal paintings by Laura Bifano, inspired by her love of nature and classic 8-bit video games. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Sep 22, 2011 - 21 comments

Humour can be the carrier of messages that are otherwise hard to convey.

Superherodom after 40. A series of paintings by Andreas Englund. Coral cache here.
posted by blue_beetle on Aug 29, 2011 - 57 comments

Andy Denzler

Andy Denzler is an artist some of whose paintings resemble paused VHS tapes.
posted by shakespeherian on Aug 17, 2011 - 56 comments

Paul Cezanne: The Complete Works

Paul Cezanne: The Complete Works
posted by Trurl on Aug 16, 2011 - 13 comments

Note to self: invest in a deadbolt.

When Brandon left for camp, his last words were, "stay out of my room!" Unfortunately for Brandon, he has the meanest most awesome family in the entire world. [more inside]
posted by phunniemee on Aug 15, 2011 - 577 comments

Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Mother-lode. [more inside]
posted by Ahab on Aug 14, 2011 - 9 comments

The unseen Ghent Altarpiece

Using infrared reflectography, conservators at the Getty Museum have produced an infrared reflectogram of what lies beneath Jan Van Eyck's Ghent Altarpiece. In the site's current phase, you can see hi-res images of the altarpiece both opened and closed, and can compare two images at once. The Met offers further information about the altarpiece, while the National Gallery explains a smaller-scale project devoted to Jan van Eyck's portrait of his wife.
posted by thomas j wise on Jul 30, 2011 - 11 comments

"A Mock. A Mock. A Lie."

This Man was Hired to Depress Art This is the opinion of Will Blake my Proofs of this Opinion are given in the following Notes [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jul 28, 2011 - 16 comments

Pierre Bonnard: The Intimiste

Pierre Bonnard died in 1947, after a lifetime of producing a great many intense and beautiful paintings, in keeping with his philosophy of domestic bliss, idealised and frozen in time if not realised in real life. A calm and intelligent man, he pursued his purpose doggedly and left behind an enduring legacy of visual joy. Surely as great an achievement as any painter could wish for. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Jul 27, 2011 - 17 comments

Madeline von Foerster

The Art of Madeline von Foerster (nsfw). [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jul 9, 2011 - 14 comments

Toy Shining

Illustrator Kyle Lambert has used his iPad (with the Brushed app) to paint a series of stills from an imaginary Toy Story 3/ The Shining mashup.
posted by bonobothegreat on Jul 6, 2011 - 15 comments

This thread's title was found by trial and error.

Daniel Eatock is a London-based designer known for his conceptual approach to solving traditional client problems as well as those of his own choosing.[1] His projects include Spray Can Sprayed With Its Own Contents, Fixed Pen/Signature Book, and many others, including my favorite, One Hour Circles, in which participants attempt to draw a circle in exactly one hour. (Compare to One Minute Circles.) A brief interview with Eatock. Some selected work. An overview.
posted by shakespeherian on Jun 23, 2011 - 26 comments

Upper upchuck

I don't like art with puke. It's not in my pallet. It's disgusting.
posted by twoleftfeet on Jun 18, 2011 - 69 comments

"God gave me the talent to pose for pictures and it seems to make people happy. That can't be a bad thing, can it?"

Many of the photos of classic pin-up Bettie Page were taken by the photographer Paula Klaw, who helped to run the photo shop and men's magazine business owned by her brother Irving. Chuck Keefe (blog), an artist, had several photographs of Klaw's autographed by her, and eventually by Bettie herself. An interesting look at part of the story of two of pin-up's most notorious women....
posted by theartandsound on May 12, 2011 - 13 comments

Portraits of Iraqis by Daniel Heyman

I am an artist who by a stroke of good fortune met a brave American lawyer who represents several hundred Iraqi detainees in the US federal courts....the Iraqis I interviewed, released by the American military after many months or years of detention, were never formally accused of a crime, brought to a trial or given legal representation. Daniel Heyman paints and draws while sitting in on interviews between former Abu Ghraib detainees and their lawyer Susan Burke. Interview (including Heyman's thoughts about Errol Morris' documentary Standard Operating Procedure). Review. Another gallery. Related: The Detainee Project. Via zunguzungu. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Apr 24, 2011 - 5 comments

The shortest distance between two points is often uninteresting

Oakland artist Momoko Sudo paints lines. One at a time, free-hand.
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Apr 23, 2011 - 16 comments

Ebru Aqueous Surface Art

The Internet can be a powerful tool when it comes to collaborations between artists of all ilks. Laptop band Project Jenny, Project Jan harnessed said power when it set out to create a video for its new song, “Lucky Me,” producing a lovely, painterly video courtesy of a Turkish Ebrû artist the band had never met. Hikmet Barutçugil redefined the aspects of Ebrû with a scientific approach and managed to transfuse marbling into other disciplines, from architecture to popular crafts. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Apr 23, 2011 - 1 comment

This is daddy. His head is shaped like a decayed turnip.

Children's drawings painted realistically.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Apr 22, 2011 - 33 comments

Jack and Patrick draw and paint

Two people involved in marathon, inspirational artistic efforts: Six-year-old Jack Henderson is offering to draw anything in exchange for a donation to the Sick Kids hospital in Edinburgh, which treats his little brother Noah for bronchiolitis. Meanwhile, artist Patrick Joyce, aka The Incurable Optimist, is trying to paint 100 portraits before motor neurone disease (also known as ALS) robs him of his abilities, and, ultimately, his life. Their works include, respectively, A rubber duck riding a bike shooting lasers, and Professor Stephen Hawking. [more inside]
posted by penguin pie on Mar 26, 2011 - 5 comments

women portrait themselves

The original time-lapse self portrait? And some modern artists: Enchanting self portraits from Iceland's Rebekka Gaudleifs. Nude self portrait (NSFW) from Israeli artist Roni River. Disturbing stories from Canada's projecteye (NSFW) and magical self-portrait from New Hampshire-based Sarah Ann Loreth.
posted by SylviaAspevig on Mar 21, 2011 - 8 comments

Painting is a Process

Painting of a tangerine... being peeled (SLYT) Painter Duane Keiser paints a tangerine. Then peels it. Then paints it. Then peels it. Then paints it. Fun video, I thought.
posted by cogpsychprof on Mar 18, 2011 - 25 comments

Caravaggio’s Criminal Record

Caravaggio's crimes exposed in Rome's police files: "Four hundred years after his death, Caravaggio is a 21st Century superstar among old master painters. His stark, dramatically lit, super-realistic paintings strike a modern chord - but his police record is more shocking than any modern bad boy rock star's. An exhibition of documents at Rome's State Archives throws vivid light on his tumultuous life here at the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th centuries." [Via] [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Feb 18, 2011 - 50 comments

Gloria Muriel

Painter Gloria Muriel: Pop Surrealism on a Spiritual Quest. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Feb 13, 2011 - 4 comments

Spilling Paint on Purpose

Psychedelic painting done just a bit differently: Tall Painting | Time Lapses | Paint Montage. All available in 1080p HD by Holton Rower.
posted by netbros on Feb 12, 2011 - 10 comments

Bryan Lewis Saunders

'On March 30th 1995, I started doing at least one Self-Portrait everyday for the rest of my life. At present I have over 7,900 of them. [...] After experiencing drastic changes in my environment, I looked for other experiences that might profoundly affect my perception of the self. So I devised another experiment where everyday I took a different drug and drew myself under the influence.'
posted by shakespeherian on Jan 19, 2011 - 47 comments

Nothing is Forgotten

Nothing is Forgotten, a lovely little wordless comic about loss, fear, kindness, and memory.
posted by Gator on Jan 4, 2011 - 39 comments

Art that lives. Literally.

40,000-year-old rock paintings are alive. "These organisms are alive and could have replenished themselves over endless millennia to explain the freshness of the paintings' appearance," Professor Pettigrew told BBC News.
posted by longsleeves on Dec 28, 2010 - 22 comments

A streetcar is a streetcar, right?

Kelley Turgeon's painting of Toronto's iconic streetcars won a contest for the Toronto Star Emerging Artist Cover Contest. Along with $2500 in prize money for the contest winner, the winning painting was also published Friday on the front page of the newspaper. Photographer Brian Labelle noticed because he had taken an eerily similar photograph in 2007. [more inside]
posted by typewriter on Dec 25, 2010 - 53 comments

Kerfuffle in the LA Art Scene

Kerfuffle in the LA Art Scene- the possibility that both the mural and its whitewashing are the art - from artist Mario Muller's Truffle Hunting
posted by pt68 on Dec 14, 2010 - 14 comments

The Acrylic Age of Science Fiction

MANCHU Starships - wonderful old school SF paintings by French illustartor Philippe Bouchet.
posted by Artw on Nov 14, 2010 - 33 comments

HP Lovecraft Creature Lab

In September, Jon Schindehette [previously] and Lars Grant-West [wiki] issued a challenge to students at the Rhode Island School of Design: "Create a creature based upon a non-humanoid critter from H.P. Lovecraft's literature. The creature should have a fully resolved form, convey motion where appropriate, and be believable. Creature can be shown as either 3/4 view or 'turn-arounds'." Here are the entries and here are the judges' comments. [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Nov 8, 2010 - 58 comments

Art History in HD

Haltadefinizione is a gallery of extremely high resolution pictures of some of the greatest art treasures.
posted by gman on Oct 4, 2010 - 22 comments

Van Whoah

It's possible to use Photoshop to simulate the depth of field, color saturation, and camera angle associated with tilt-shift photography. ArtCyclopedia applied this process to Van Gogh paintings. (via) [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Sep 26, 2010 - 91 comments

Digital Fingerpainters (heh)

Love to finger paint with pixels? Or do you prefer the stylus for your stylizing? Either way, the International Association of Mobile Digital Artists beckons (gestures?). It all started with a group of enthusiasts on Flickr (Flickr group).

Membership is free. So is registration for the Mobile Art Conference 2010 (NYC), but they're accepting donations. [more inside]
posted by circular on Sep 15, 2010 - 4 comments

[Warning—painted Victorian bosom below]

On Tor.com, Mefi'sown Patrick Garcon (smoke) is writing lively essays on Victorian fantasy illustration, from the Pre-Raphaelites to Orientalism. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Sep 3, 2010 - 12 comments

James Gurney— illustrator and artist of Dinotopia— has a blog!

James Gurney (of Dinotopia fame) blogs at Gurney Journey daily about making art, making worlds, and making faces.
posted by yaymukund on Sep 3, 2010 - 7 comments

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, baker, painter

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein was born in Wisconsin on July 31, 1910. He lived in a small house in Milwaukee with his wife Marie, and he worked in a bakery. Between 1954 and 1963 he used his fingers, combs, quills and bakery tools to create hundreds of explosively colorful semi-abstract landscapes that evoke primordial soup biology, Lovecraftian horror, scifi weirdness and hellish alien beauty ('Full-Screen View' and its zoomable interface increase the pleasure dramatically). The 12 galleries of paintings at his memorial site are all available for free hi-res download, you can hear him talking about drugs, brain chemistry and visions at the 'Listen' link, and there's currently an exhibit honoring the centennial of his birth at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore.
posted by mediareport on Aug 25, 2010 - 24 comments

Apocalypse and Amnesia

How "The Last Washington Painting" Became "The Lost Washington Painting": Losing- and finding again- Alan Sonneman's "apocalyptic image of nuclear doom".
posted by jjray on Aug 23, 2010 - 13 comments

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