431 posts tagged with painting.
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Makes No Difference Who You Are

Disasterland [NSFW cartoons] is Mexican artist Rodolfo Loaiza's tribute to pop culture, fashion, animation, horror films and the undeniable attraction of celebrity, often in the form of twisted Disney juxtapositions. More at the artist's Flickr.
posted by laconic skeuomorph on Jul 31, 2012 - 16 comments

Vertical Diamond in the Rough

Abstract artist Ilya Bolotowsky is represented in quite a few museums. But a painting of his, Vertical Diamond, appeared in a more unusual location,, was snapped up for bargain price of $9.99 and was nearly recycled into pet paintings. A label on the back of the painting from the Weatherspoon Art Museum led the museum's registrars to dig into archived files and track some of the painting's history before it found itself in the bargain bin.
posted by PussKillian on Jul 27, 2012 - 37 comments

The Ju-Ju Magic of the Miners of Afosu

The Ju-Ju Magic of the Miners of Afosu. Photos and paintings from Ghana by Ben Zawalich.
posted by homunculus on Jul 26, 2012 - 2 comments

Monster Brains

Monster Brains is a blog about paintings and drawings of monsters. My favourite post on the site showcased Masters Of The Universe Paintings By Earl Norem, William George and Esteban Maroto.
posted by chunking express on Jul 17, 2012 - 7 comments

Sorry

I Can't Apologize Enough is an ongoing series of small mixed media drawings by David Fullarton. [more inside]
posted by xod on Jun 26, 2012 - 12 comments

(decisions made easier in this hideous homemade christmas sweater)

In the Studio: The Process of a Painting. Mark Schoening gives New American Paintings a look into his months-long process on a new painting. More on Shoening's Tumblr and Vimeo.
posted by shakespeherian on Jun 20, 2012 - 1 comment

I like the one on velvet.

Let's add some monsters to thrift store paintings! Artists Chris McMahon and Thryza Segal decided to inject a little fun into these discarded works and give them a second life by adding monsters to the scenic landscapes.
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Apr 15, 2012 - 40 comments

The Dying of the Light

Thomas Kinkade, the "Painter of Light" and one of the most popular artists in America, died suddenly Friday at his Los Gatos home. He was 54. [more inside]
posted by darkstar on Apr 6, 2012 - 162 comments

Watching paint dry just got interesting

Phyllis Toburen combines painting and macro-photography to create lovely sculptural enamel pieces. [more inside]
posted by quin on Apr 4, 2012 - 2 comments

All my own work

'I'd like 11 and a half tons of resin, please': the artisans behind the artists
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Apr 1, 2012 - 32 comments

Closer I Am to Van Eyck

Closer to Van Eyck is an ultra-high-resolution look at one of the greatest masterpieces of Flemish painting, the Ghent Altarpiece (previously) an astounding 100 billion pixels in size. Stolen, with permission, from peacay's Twitter stream.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Feb 26, 2012 - 16 comments

Dr. Sketchy au Centre Pompidou

(some links may be NSFW) Dr. Sketchy's Anti-Art School Paris branch recently took to the Centre Pompidou for a session of drawing and modernist art. Models were inspired by several paintings in the gallery, such as Otto Dix's Portrait de la journaliste Sylvia Von Harden (1926), Fernand Léger'sComposition with Two Parrots (1939), Man Ray's Ingre's Violin (1924), Robert Delaunay, Erté, and Pablo Picasso. Here are photos of the session as well as some of the sketches.
posted by shakespeherian on Feb 20, 2012 - 7 comments

"It was as if he knew he was going to a very dark place and he knew he couldn't do anything about it,"

Artistic decline through Alzheimer's - William Utermohlen was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 1995 yet he continued drawing. His last self portraits painted between 1995 and 2001 tell a unique tale of an implacable disease encroaching on to his mind and senses. [more inside]
posted by quin on Feb 6, 2012 - 39 comments

New masters

SF versions of famous artworks
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 5, 2012 - 31 comments

The Lucas Cranach Art Archive

"The Cranach Digital Archive is an interdisciplinary collaborative research resource, providing access to art historical, technical and conservation information on paintings by Lucas Cranach (c.1472 - 1553) and his workshop. The repository presently provides information on more than 400 paintings including c.5000 images and documents from 19 partner institutions."
posted by peacay on Jan 18, 2012 - 4 comments

Figure Drawing Training Tool

Gesture drawing from home: a convenient tool for practising figure drawing
posted by rollick on Jan 17, 2012 - 16 comments

The Speedy Bob Ross!

If you like Bob Ross and his happy trees, you will enjoy Fabian Gaete Maureira. This Chilean street artist produces scenes reminiscent of that of Bob Ross and "The Joy of Painting." But he does it in three minutes! And just for the heck of it, here are some memorable videos of Bob Ross painting: Mountains Evergreen Tree Clouds
posted by zizzle on Jan 16, 2012 - 16 comments

Goldfish Salvation

Riusuke Fukahori uses images painted on layers of resin to create mind-blowing three dimensional pieces that look amazingly real. [video]
posted by quin on Jan 10, 2012 - 10 comments

An Arrow in the Androgyne

Emerging surrealist artist Margo Selski, known for her Modern Subcultures-and-Flemish fusion inspired theatrical portraiture, has opened a new exhibit that prominently features and celebrates her shy 12-year old son Theo, who attended the opening gala in a beautiful red velvet gown, pearls, and black lace opera gloves. [more inside]
posted by Chipmazing on Jan 7, 2012 - 20 comments

Pop Surrealist Intervention Art

"These pictures began as a family tradition of giving each other 'gag gifts' for Christmas; I took cheap oils from a local flea market and embellished them with absurdities." (Possibly NSFW: nude painting in second link, second page of third link.)
posted by griphus on Jan 6, 2012 - 15 comments

"I have always been concerned with painting that simultaneously insists on a flat surface and then denies it."

"I had no desire to copy Pollock. I didn’t want to take a stick and dip it in a can of enamel. I needed something more liquid, watery, thinner. All my life, I have been drawn to water and translucency. I love the water; I love to swim, to watch changing seascapes. One of my favorite childhood games was to fill a sink with water and punt nail polish into to see what happened when the colors burst up the surface, merging into each other as floating, changing shapes." - Helen Frankenthaler
Her paintings looked like watercolors, but were created with oils. To achieve the effect, she heavily diluted her oil paints with turpentine, then dripped them onto an unprimed canvas on the floor, in a brushless technique reminiscent of Jackson Pollock's, called a "soak stain." But where Pollock's paint was often thick and sat on top of the canvas, hers drenched it in color, creating a unique, softer work. Ms. Frankenthaler passed away today, at the age of 83, after a long illness. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 27, 2011 - 35 comments

Giorgio Morandi

Aspirants to the role of painter-as-poet are many. Giorgio Morandi was the real thing. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Dec 22, 2011 - 5 comments

The paintings of Don Van Vliet

Don Van Vliet is self-taught. He neither expects allowances for the amateur’s lack of dexterity nor permits any technical deficiency on his own part to limit his scope. Nobody's understanding or forbearance sets limits to what he does - any more than does the fear of going wrong. The lacerations, transgressions, and awkward moments that he introduces are unpredictable, as is their duration; when he takes the figures that confront him and tugs them out of shape, he simultaneously tugs himself out of shape - and out of his own limitations. - Roberto Ohrt
posted by Trurl on Dec 14, 2011 - 14 comments

Degenerate Art

Franz Sedlacek (1891 – 1945) was an Austrian painter who belonged to the tradition known as "New Objectivity" ("neue Sachlichkeit"), an artistic movement similar to Magical Realism. At the end of the Second World War he "disappeared" as a soldier of the Wehrmacht somewhere in Poland.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 7, 2011 - 4 comments

Alberto Giacometti

One afternoon in September 1958, a beautiful, distinguished and mysterious woman arrived at the door of number 46 rue Hippolyte Maindron. This was the Paris studio where Alberto Giacometti had been working since 1926, having arrived in the city four years earlier. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Dec 1, 2011 - 7 comments

John Ruskin's Elements of Drawing

The Elements of Drawing: John Ruskin's Teaching Collection at Oxford digitizes the drawings, engravings, and paintings that John Ruskin collected (and created) for use in teaching drawing. The objects can be viewed separately or in their teaching order and context, with Ruskin's own catalog annotations. The site also suggests how modern art students can put the collection to use, with instructional video and a variety of drawing exercises. Ruskin also assembled another fine art collection for working-class viewers in Sheffield; you can see that collection at the Museum of Sheffield, which also helps sponsor a digital reconstruction of the original museum building, the St. George's Museum.
posted by thomas j wise on Nov 14, 2011 - 5 comments

It's contemprary and it's good and it's in Barcelona

The Museo Europeu de Art Modern in Barcelona presently has an exhibition of contemporary art featuring many catalan and spanish painters and sculpters and is housed in a restaured palacio (click through the "plantas"). MEAM is associated with figurativas en red.
As this is contemporary art, nudes abound and this post is unfortunately NSFW in many places.
posted by adamvasco on Nov 14, 2011 - 1 comment

Brother, can you spare a masterpiece?

Paintings by Leonardo da Vinci are among the rarest and most coveted treasures in the museum world. So how did the National Gallery manage to assemble two thirds of the world's supply for its new show Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan?
posted by Horace Rumpole on Nov 5, 2011 - 25 comments

“We shall have a man in the White House who will feel as responsible for American civilization as he does for American power and prosperity.”

"It was no accident that arts funding was once again brought to national attention with the exhibit Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture. Since the 80s, the enemies of the NEA have not been those with differences of opinion about what art should be supported or how. Instead they oppose any support at all for art of any kind." Hide/Seek, Culture Wars and the History of the NEA (NSFW, art)
posted by The Whelk on Nov 1, 2011 - 115 comments

Makes me want to go hunting for secret art.

A fore-edge painting (previously, but it's been a while) is a painting on the edges of the pages of a book that can only be seen when the pages are fanned out. Marist College has a nice history and introduction and the Boston Public Library has an impressive gallery.
posted by Vibrissa on Oct 25, 2011 - 8 comments

Astronauts who got creative about their experiences

Over 500 people have traveled into outer space. While many have written books about the experience, only a few have used more creative means to express what they saw and felt. Here are a few: [more inside]
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Oct 9, 2011 - 13 comments

Amy works entirely without a paintbrush.

Amy works entirely without a paintbrush. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Oct 2, 2011 - 55 comments

A landscape of the mind

''Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains'' is the greatest surviving masterpiece by Huang Gongwang (黄公望 1269-1354), one of the Four Yuan Masters; considered one of the finest of all Chinese paintings, it served as a model and inspiration for many subsequent literati artists. The scroll suffered fire damage in the early Qing and was divided into two parts. This summer, a special exhibition at the National Palace Museum in Taiwan reunited these two portions of Huang's masterwork for the first time in 360 years.
posted by Abiezer on Oct 1, 2011 - 18 comments

'The most excellent painter that England hath yet bred'

Britain's finest Baroque portraitist, on a par with Frans Hals, has been all but forgotten, but a new BBC documentary and associated website seek to address that. William Dobson, 1611-46, was painter to Charles I's court during the English Civil War, and the turmoil of the period meant that much of his biography and even the names of the subjects of his portraits were lost. But many of his portraits have survived, and they're astonishing. [more inside]
posted by rory on Oct 1, 2011 - 18 comments

'Flesh was the reason oil paint was invented'

There is currently a far reaching retrospective at the MOMA in New York on painter Willem de Kooning, that most deeply European of the Abstract Expressionists who drew the international art world's attention to New York back in the post war years. He's most famous as the creator of one of the few paintings of the 20th century that stills retains the ability to shock. But, as this quite interesting MOMA website shows, there was a lot more to his enterprise than most people realize. My first post here by the way.
posted by Phlegmco(tm) on Sep 28, 2011 - 19 comments

8-Bit Animal Paintings

"Menagerie" is a series of 10 polygonal animal paintings by Laura Bifano, inspired by her love of nature and classic 8-bit video games. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Sep 22, 2011 - 21 comments

Humour can be the carrier of messages that are otherwise hard to convey.

Superherodom after 40. A series of paintings by Andreas Englund. Coral cache here.
posted by blue_beetle on Aug 29, 2011 - 57 comments

Andy Denzler

Andy Denzler is an artist some of whose paintings resemble paused VHS tapes.
posted by shakespeherian on Aug 17, 2011 - 56 comments

Paul Cezanne: The Complete Works

Paul Cezanne: The Complete Works
posted by Trurl on Aug 16, 2011 - 13 comments

Note to self: invest in a deadbolt.

When Brandon left for camp, his last words were, "stay out of my room!" Unfortunately for Brandon, he has the meanest most awesome family in the entire world. [more inside]
posted by phunniemee on Aug 15, 2011 - 577 comments

Louis Comfort Tiffany

Louis Comfort Tiffany: The Mother-lode. [more inside]
posted by Ahab on Aug 14, 2011 - 9 comments

The unseen Ghent Altarpiece

Using infrared reflectography, conservators at the Getty Museum have produced an infrared reflectogram of what lies beneath Jan Van Eyck's Ghent Altarpiece. In the site's current phase, you can see hi-res images of the altarpiece both opened and closed, and can compare two images at once. The Met offers further information about the altarpiece, while the National Gallery explains a smaller-scale project devoted to Jan van Eyck's portrait of his wife.
posted by thomas j wise on Jul 30, 2011 - 11 comments

"A Mock. A Mock. A Lie."

This Man was Hired to Depress Art This is the opinion of Will Blake my Proofs of this Opinion are given in the following Notes [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jul 28, 2011 - 16 comments

Pierre Bonnard: The Intimiste

Pierre Bonnard died in 1947, after a lifetime of producing a great many intense and beautiful paintings, in keeping with his philosophy of domestic bliss, idealised and frozen in time if not realised in real life. A calm and intelligent man, he pursued his purpose doggedly and left behind an enduring legacy of visual joy. Surely as great an achievement as any painter could wish for. [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Jul 27, 2011 - 17 comments

Madeline von Foerster

The Art of Madeline von Foerster (nsfw). [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jul 9, 2011 - 14 comments

Toy Shining

Illustrator Kyle Lambert has used his iPad (with the Brushed app) to paint a series of stills from an imaginary Toy Story 3/ The Shining mashup.
posted by bonobothegreat on Jul 6, 2011 - 15 comments

This thread's title was found by trial and error.

Daniel Eatock is a London-based designer known for his conceptual approach to solving traditional client problems as well as those of his own choosing.[1] His projects include Spray Can Sprayed With Its Own Contents, Fixed Pen/Signature Book, and many others, including my favorite, One Hour Circles, in which participants attempt to draw a circle in exactly one hour. (Compare to One Minute Circles.) A brief interview with Eatock. Some selected work. An overview.
posted by shakespeherian on Jun 23, 2011 - 26 comments

Upper upchuck

I don't like art with puke. It's not in my pallet. It's disgusting.
posted by twoleftfeet on Jun 18, 2011 - 69 comments

"God gave me the talent to pose for pictures and it seems to make people happy. That can't be a bad thing, can it?"

Many of the photos of classic pin-up Bettie Page were taken by the photographer Paula Klaw, who helped to run the photo shop and men's magazine business owned by her brother Irving. Chuck Keefe (blog), an artist, had several photographs of Klaw's autographed by her, and eventually by Bettie herself. An interesting look at part of the story of two of pin-up's most notorious women....
posted by theartandsound on May 12, 2011 - 13 comments

Portraits of Iraqis by Daniel Heyman

I am an artist who by a stroke of good fortune met a brave American lawyer who represents several hundred Iraqi detainees in the US federal courts....the Iraqis I interviewed, released by the American military after many months or years of detention, were never formally accused of a crime, brought to a trial or given legal representation. Daniel Heyman paints and draws while sitting in on interviews between former Abu Ghraib detainees and their lawyer Susan Burke. Interview (including Heyman's thoughts about Errol Morris' documentary Standard Operating Procedure). Review. Another gallery. Related: The Detainee Project. Via zunguzungu. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Apr 24, 2011 - 5 comments

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