5 posts tagged with panorama by filthy light thief.
Displaying 1 through 5 of 5.

15 famous landmarks, put into context

Sometimes, famous landmarks lose some of their draw when put in context, as seen in this Imgur gallery, which was expanded and modified slightly by Bored Panda. For more physical context, there are Google earth links below the break. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 19, 2014 - 96 comments

Panoramas on Four of the Seven Summits

Google Maps surmounts four of the Seven Summits: Aconcagua (South America), Kilimanjaro (Africa), Everest Base Camp (Asia), and Mount Elbrus (Europe). It's not quite a "street" view of the Grand Canyon, but 360 degree panoramas.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 21, 2013 - 19 comments

Heinrich Berann, the father of the modern cartographic panorama

Heinrich Caesar Berann is known as the father of the modern cartographic panorama and is also credited as the most prolific panorama artist ever. His style and work could be credited with the lasting appeal of stylized panoramic maps that often feature exaggerated or distorted features as the preferred map type for ski resorts and trails (PDF) but Berann's true passion was art, as seen in these collections of his paintings and drawings found on the tribute site maintained by his grandson, Matthias Troyer. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 2, 2013 - 6 comments

Panoramic Virtual Tour of Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Take a Panoramic Virtual Tour of Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Available as a full-screen virtual tour starting entry rotunda and navigating from there, or jump to individual rooms.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 14, 2011 - 7 comments

Explore the F & P Daguerreotype, The Cincinnati Panorama of 1848

In September of 1848, Charles Fontayne and William Porter took a series of 8 panoramic views of Cincinnati by the then still new daguerreian process, capturing a little more than two miles of the riverfront. In skilled hands, daguerreotype can capture an amazing resolution, so much that modern technology is required to view the full image. In 2007, the 1848 Cincinnati panorama was restored, utilizing a stereo microscope, finding so much detail that the eight 6 ½ inch by 8 ¼ inch plates could be enlarged up to 170 by 20 feet without losing clarity. In May of this year, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County put the daguerreotype plates on display with touch-screen computer displays to see the fine details. But if you can't make it to Cincinnati, the library has a new website where you can navigate and zoom in for a glimpse of life along the riverfront. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 19, 2011 - 29 comments

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