204 posts tagged with paper.
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Makerie Believe

Fantastical Fairground: A turning, moving, enchanting papercraft project from Makerie Studio.
posted by jacquilynne on Jun 15, 2016 - 3 comments

Gone in Six Characters

Gone in Six Characters: Short URLs Considered Harmful for Cloud Services [abstract] [pdf] [more inside]
posted by Elementary Penguin on Apr 13, 2016 - 35 comments

It's the floofy clouds that get me

Sarah Kent of Apple Seed Paper Cuts has created a set of cheerfully detailed English villages.
posted by jacquilynne on Apr 11, 2016 - 11 comments

How to replicate the origami figures in Blade Runner

Kenneth Thompson searched the internet to find a place to purchase one of Gaff's unicorns from Blade Runner, and when he couldn't find any he decided to make it himself. And while he does sell them, he has provided free instructions and videos to help anyone make their own Blade Runner origami unicorn or chicken. Includes bonus matchstick man instructions.
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 10, 2016 - 32 comments

Emma Watson and bell hooks Talk Feminism in Paper Magazine

Engaging with feminism, there is this kind of bubble now that goes off in my head where these really negative thoughts about myself hit where I'm able to combat them in a very rational and quick way. I can see it now in a way that's different. I guess if I could give women anything through feminism -- or you're asking about power -- it would just be, to be able to move away, to move through all of that. I see so many women struggling with issues of self-esteem. They know and they hear it and they read it in magazines and books all the time that self-love is really important, but it's really hard to actually do -- [via boingboing]
posted by cgc373 on Feb 19, 2016 - 13 comments

Espionage Techniques of Seventeenth-Century Women

While Dr. Nadine Akkerman of Leiden University was examining letters sent by Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia (Google books preview) during her exile in the Hague, she discovered that some were filled with secret codes.... Akkerman was intrigued as to why the queen would require such covert correspondence. This was her first encounter with the 17th-century female spy.
Within England, Dr. Akkerman uncovered a network of more than sixty female spies. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 16, 2016 - 11 comments

Folding and securing paper to function as its own enclosure

‘Letterlocking refers to the folding and securing of any writing surface (such as papyrus, parchment, and paper) to function as its own enclosure.’ In their YouTube channel, Jana Dambrogio of MIT Libraries and her colleagues demonstrate a number of letterlocking techniques, from a simple method used by Russian soldiers in WWII, to more elaborate and ‘secure’ schemes employed by the likes of John Donne, Constanijn Huygens, Elizabeth Stuart and Queen Elizabeth I. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Feb 10, 2016 - 18 comments

in all the papers

Paper people can have weddings, historical costumes, and baroque wigs made from paper.
posted by dilettante on Jan 29, 2016 - 5 comments

“This station is now the ultimate power in the universe!”

It’s a Trap: Emperor Palpatine’s Poison Pill by Zachary Feinstein [.PDF]
In this paper we study the financial repercussions of the destruction of two fully armed and operational moon-sized battle stations (“Death Stars”) in a 4-year period and the dissolution of the galactic government in Star Wars. The emphasis of this work is to calibrate and simulate a model of the banking and financial systems within the galaxy. Along these lines, we measure the level of systemic risk that may have been generated by the death of Emperor Palpatine and the destruction of the second Death Star. We conclude by finding the economic resources the Rebel Alliance would need to have in reserve in order to prevent a financial crisis from gripping the galaxy through an optimally allocated banking bailout.
via: Popular Science [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Dec 2, 2015 - 38 comments

Four Months Hand-Cutting A Paper Microbe

“Cut Microbe” is a sculpture entirely hand cut out of paper. Measuring 44 inches/112cms in length, it is half a million times bigger than the ecoli bacteria upon which it is based. I wanted to create a sculpture that reflected in the process of being made the incredible scale and complexity of this microbiological world. I am amazed at the strange beauty of the natural world and wanted to open people’s eyes to aspects of it that they rarely see. -Rogan Brown
posted by jammy on Nov 5, 2015 - 19 comments

A design doc to write home about

With the introduction of Google's new logo, why not take a look at the extensive documentation explaining the details of their Material Design philosophy?
posted by cthuljew on Sep 17, 2015 - 44 comments

Come Fly With Me

The Federal Aviation Administration has approved the use of a paper airplane drone. Forbes has an interview with the UAV advocate who filed the petition to get an exemption for the paper airplane drone.
posted by Rob Rockets on Aug 28, 2015 - 10 comments

From the Persian for "eyebrow"

Ebru (paper marbling) has a long tradition in Turkey with more than just the feathery peacock pattern on your kleenex boxes. In the gallery at Ebru Atölyesi, some look geologic, some combed, some swirls, even leaves and flowers. Modern patterns exploit turbulence in the bath. [more inside]
posted by janell on Aug 22, 2015 - 11 comments

"The map began as just a doodle."

In the summer of 1963 Jerry Gretzinger began drawing a map of an imaginary city. You can now use Jerry's Map to zoom in on any of the over 3,200 eight by ten inch panels of the original paper map, executed in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print. This short film by Greg Whitmore takes a fascinating look at the project and the artist's process, which "is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on May 26, 2015 - 2 comments

Write on.

This is a blog about all things pencil. Sometimes pens. Paper, too.
posted by phunniemee on Apr 22, 2015 - 21 comments

Over or under?

Over. [more inside]
posted by QuakerMel on Mar 17, 2015 - 52 comments

Paper Engineering: Over 700 years of Fold, Pull, Pop & Turn

The history of paper engineering in books, or the making of "pop-up books" didn't start as a way to entertain children, but in the search for more tools to educate adults, including some proto-computers from as early as the 13th century. Let Ellen G. K. Rubin, known also as The Popup Lady, regale and inform you at length, in either the form of a 50 minute presentation for the Smithsonian Libraries, or read through her website, where she has a timeline of movable books and see the glossary for definitions of the different movements as starting points. Or you can browse the Smithsonian's digital exhibition (the physical exhibition ended a few years ago). And of course, there's plenty more online. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 10, 2015 - 17 comments

Paper Sculpture by Ito Wataru

Ito Wataru is a paper artist from Saitama, Japan, who graduated from Tokyo National University a few years ago. A Castle on the Ocean 海の上のお城 (2007) is the product of four years of work and has lights and a little paper train (which moves, but alas, no video). [more inside]
posted by wintersweet on Jan 19, 2015 - 3 comments

"Simple four-stringed lute set to invade North America"

1915: The Year Ahead [The Globe & Mail] [.pdf]
posted by Fizz on Jan 3, 2015 - 9 comments

Papers, Please?

The dream and the myth of the paperless city [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 2, 2015 - 18 comments

"No army has accomplished more than printed textbooks have"

Many are worried about what [e-book] technology means for books, with big bookshops closing, new devices spreading, novice authors flooding the market and an online behemoth known as Amazon growing ever more powerful. Their anxieties cannot simply be written off as predictable technophobia. The digital transition may well change the way books are written, sold and read more than any development in their history, and that will not be to everyone’s advantage. Veterans and revolutionaries alike may go bust; Gutenberg died almost penniless, having lost control of his press to Fust and other creditors. But to see technology purely as a threat to books risks missing a key point. Books are not just “tree flakes encased in dead cow”, as a scholar once wryly put it. They are a technology in their own right, one developed and used for the refinement and advancement of thought. And this technology is a powerful, long-lived and adaptable one.
From Papyrus to Pixels is a long essay in The Economist about the changing form of books, presented both as a traditional web-scroll, as an e-book and in audio form.
posted by Kattullus on Dec 26, 2014 - 33 comments

Eckerd College paper schools it's college president on sexual assault

President of Eckerd college Donald Eastman III wrote a letter to the students about preventing sexual assault. His recommendation? Less alcohol and less casual sex. The college's student paper, The Current, responds in a civil, well spoken and cogent rebuttal.
posted by asavage on Nov 27, 2014 - 123 comments

Rainy Day

Pencil and Paper Games is devoted to games you can play with nothing more than a pencil and a piece of paper (some of which can be played on the site, for those who do not have access to a pencil and paper, or remember what those are.) [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog on Nov 26, 2014 - 11 comments

My New Folding and Throwing Technique is Unstoppable

John Collins, holder of the world record for paper airplane flight distance, shows you how to fold that airplane. Here, he demonstrates the plane to David Rees[previously], along with a few other designs, which he also teaches to you: the Tube, the Boomerang, and the Tumbling Wing. [more inside]
posted by not_on_display on Nov 16, 2014 - 11 comments

These carpets are magic

Lisa Nilsson's new paper quilling project is called Tapis. [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne on Nov 10, 2014 - 6 comments

Paper birds

Diana Beltran Herrera sculpts beautiful birds out of paper. She's currently working on a series based on postage stamps; you can see some of the new birds on her Facebook page. [via]
posted by jacquilynne on Sep 29, 2014 - 12 comments

Super Paper Mario

Wuppes is a guy from Luxembourg who makes 3D scenes of classic video games out of paper.
posted by DoctorFedora on Sep 1, 2014 - 9 comments

Pen Paper Ink Letter Massive Review Index

Pen Paper Ink Letter is a pen and paper blog maintained by Heath Cates. Currently holding Ink Week, its best feature is a massive index of product reviews, from the blog itself and other blogs. [more inside]
posted by Elementary Penguin on Aug 29, 2014 - 10 comments

FPP: Foundation Paper Piecing

Many types of quilt blocks can be built by stitching together simple geometric shapes. Then there’s paper (sometimes called foundation) piecing. [more inside]
posted by heyforfour on Jul 31, 2014 - 13 comments

Where Techy Meets Pretty

Who knew structural engineering could be so sweet? Justina Yang is the "paper engineer" behind Fiber Lab, a design studio located in her sunroom. She creates paper art, décor, bracelets, bowties, and lamp shades. In her short videos, she demonstrates how to make your very own dodecahedron; a whimsical carousel that produces beautiful waves and teaches you about wave interference; a mesmerizing interactive kinetic wave sculpture; a string art geometric love story; and a delicious-looking paper croissant.
posted by fundip on Jul 31, 2014 - 4 comments

"I draw with paper instead of on it"

Yulia Brodskaya is a Russian artist/illustrator now living in England whose quilled paper pieces are increasingly in demand. Her website is rich with her work - jump right into the illustration or art sectons - or browse the news section to see a roughly reverse chronological listing. Design Taxi has collected a group of images highlighting her quilled typography. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 4, 2014 - 7 comments

Flew On The Pitch And We're 'Aving A Laugh

Yesterday, during the pre-World Cup friendly between England and Peru being played at Wembley Stadium, there were three goals scored, but the moment that captured the most attention has been this unbelievable, incredible paper airplane toss.
posted by BeerFilter on May 31, 2014 - 24 comments

3D Reconstruction from Accidental Motion

Fisher Yu, a Princeton grad student, and David Gallup, a Google employee, have published a method for retrieving the 3D information of a scene from the small motion of the hands that occurs while taking video. They've given their paper a website that includes a video, the paper itself, and a dataset. One neat application of this is the ability to simulate short depth of field, a feature that has made it into the new Google Camera app.
posted by Maecenas on Apr 19, 2014 - 26 comments

Hand Cut Illuminated Paper Art by Hari & Deepti

Harikrishan Panicker and Deepti Nair, who both hail from India, go by the duo artist name of Hari & Deepti. Together they create small and large diorama artworks made of intricately cut layered paper lit by LED lights.
posted by Room 641-A on Apr 5, 2014 - 11 comments

Building hope

Shigeru Ban’s Pritzker win proves that building hope is finally in vogue
The architecture world has a new laureate, and he builds in cardboard. Japan’s Shigeru Ban was named this week as the winner of the Pritzker Prize, an annual award that is often called architecture’s Nobel – and his win sends a clear and timely message. Social change, sustainability and improving the lives of the many: This is what matters now to the world of architecture. With Ban’s Pritzker, the global design elite is marking that shift.
Take a Tour of Pritzker Winner Shigeru Ban's Paper Tube Structures [more inside]
posted by infini on Mar 31, 2014 - 9 comments

Helping you beat Turnitin.com Since 2012

With recognition software making the use of recycled term papers impractical, a new service is now allowing students to hire unemployed professors to write term papers from scratch.
posted by reenum on Feb 10, 2014 - 139 comments

Paper Haiku

How to make handmade Japanese scroll paper.
(Many other traditional artisans at Gucci Japan)
posted by growabrain on Feb 8, 2014 - 19 comments

Keep it short and descriptive

The Shortest Science Paper Ever Published Had No Words
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jan 29, 2014 - 44 comments

"The Simplicity And Banality of Paper"

Shigeru Ban: ‘People’s architect’ combines permanence and paper"
Generally speaking, an architect’s style is defined by particular forms or shapes. There’s Frank Lloyd Wright’s prominent horizontal lines, for instance; Le Corbusier’s simple white boxes; or, more recently, the deliberately abstract masses of Frank Gehry — of Guggenheim Bilbao fame. But in the view of Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, such formal elements are ultimately little more than reflections of current trends — in the first two cases above, Modernism, and in the third, “blobbism,” or the recent taste for irregular shapes made possible by computer-aided design. According to Ban, the only way for architects to keep their work free from the influence of such transient fashions is to come up with new ways to actually build things — new materials, for example, or new approaches to structural engineering. His own answer? Paper — or, to be more precise, cardboard tubes.
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Jan 26, 2014 - 2 comments

What would happen if you played Paper Mario on a Paper Game Boy?

Zim and Zou are paper artists. They make delightfully colorful paper versions of things like food and technology and the whole world. [via]
posted by jacquilynne on Jan 24, 2014 - 4 comments

World’s Best Paper Plane Maker

Luca Iaconi-Stewart is building a ridiculously detailed scale model of a 777 out of manila folders.
posted by brundlefly on Jan 17, 2014 - 25 comments

Naturalis Historia

"My subject is a barren one – the world of nature, or in other words life; and that subject in its least elevated department, and employing either rustic terms or foreign, nay barbarian words that actually have to be introduced with an apology. Moreover, the path is not a beaten highway of authorship, nor one in which the mind is eager to range: there is not one of us who has made the same venture, nor yet one Roman who has tackled single-handed all departments of the subject."
Naturalis Historia was written by Pliny the Elder between 77 and 79 CE and was meant to serve as a kind of proto-encyclopedia discussing all of the ancient knowledge available to him, covered in enough depth and breadth to make it by a reasonable margin the largest work to survive to the modern day from the Roman era. The work includes discussions on astronomy, meteorology, geography, mineralogy, zoology and botany organized along Aristotelian divisions of nature but also includes essays on human inventions and institutions. It is dedicated to the Emperor Titus in its epistle to the Emperor Vespasian, a close friend of Pliny who relied on his extensive knowledge, and its unusually careful citations of sources as well as its index makes it a precursor to modern scholarly works. It was Pliny's last work, as well as sadly his sole surviving one, and was published not long before his death attempting to save a friend from the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, famously recounted by Pliny's eponymous nephew Pliny the Younger.
Here is a reasonable translation that is freely available to download from archive.org for your edification.
[more inside] posted by Blasdelb on Dec 16, 2013 - 24 comments

Papyralysis

Are paper books becoming obsolete in the digital age, or poised to lead a new cultural renaissance? [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 3, 2013 - 31 comments

Star Wars Snowflakes

It happens every year. The days get shorter, a sub-zero chill is in the Hoth air, the wampas start venturing into your hidden home base, and new Star Wars Snowflakes are introduced for holiday crafting fun. New to 2013, battles. It just isn't Christmas without a T-47 Snow Speeder making an attack run on an AT-AT, or Luke Skywalker facing down a hungry Rancor beast. Enjoy 13 new designs. So, get yourself a sharp cutting blade and have fun. (2012 snowflakes here.)
posted by SpacemanStix on Nov 18, 2013 - 15 comments

Papercraft project blog Paper Matrix

Paper Matrix is a blog that gives instructions for cool papercraft objects, "reinterpreting the Danish tradition of woven paper hearts and ornaments." Cut paper in the prescribed ways and weave it together carefully to make a mobile of colorful hot air balloons, gorgeous and complex boxes; simple but satisfying pennants and much more... including a full theater for performances by paper dolls.
posted by LobsterMitten on Sep 23, 2013 - 18 comments

"So when kids in my class throw it, the papers won't fly all over."

Mental Floss examines the history of the Trapper Keeper, the de rigueur school accessory of the 1980s, on its 35th birthday.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Sep 19, 2013 - 65 comments

My God, it's full of... everything

Revelations in the field of quantum physics have resulted in the discovery of the Amplituhedron, a jewel-like higher dimensional object whose volume elegantly predicts fundamental physical processes that took the brilliant Dr. Richard Feynman hundreds of pages of abstruse mathematics to describe. The theoretical manifold not only enables simple pen-and-paper calculation of physics that would normally require supercomputers to work out, but also challenges basic assumptions about the nature of reality -- forgoing the core concepts of locality and unitarity and suggesting that space and time are merely emergent properties of a timeless, infinitely-sided "master amplituhedron," whose geometry represents the sum total of all physical interactions. More: The 152-page source paper on arXiv [PDF] - Lead author Nima Arkani-Hamed's hour-long lecture at SUSY 2013 - Scans of Arkani-Hamed's handwritten lecture notes - A far more detailed lecture series "Scattering Without Space Time": one, two, three - Arkani-Hamed previously on MeFi - A hot-off-the-presses Wikipedia page (watch this space)
posted by Rhaomi on Sep 18, 2013 - 128 comments

Cats love to attack paper. Today, paper fights back.

Ginger Cat versus The Paper Army [slyt | cute | via]
posted by quin on Sep 17, 2013 - 17 comments

Don't twitch

John Franzen: Each line, one breath
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Aug 15, 2013 - 15 comments

The Cardboard Cathedral

Shigeru Ban is a Japanese architect whose work includes 'temporary' structures (YT) made from cardboard tubes. His work blurs the distinction between temporary and permanent, and includes designs that focus on cost effective and liveable shelter after natural and human disasters. Now, two-and-a-half years after the Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake destroyed the city's cathedral, the Cardboard Cathedral has been opened. [See also: 1 2 ]
posted by carter on Aug 15, 2013 - 5 comments

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